ISSN: 2451-0637
Archives of Medical Science - Civilization Diseases
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1/2019
vol. 4
 
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abstract:
Clinical research

A retrospective analysis of women diagnosed with unclassified HPV genotypes

Can Turkler
1
,
Tunay Kiremitli
1

1.
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine, Erzincan Binali Yıldırım University, Erzincan, Turkey
Arch Med Sci Civil Dis 2019; 4: e22–e27
Online publish date: 2019/06/06
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Introduction
This study primarily aimed to investigate the associations between unclassified HPV genotypes and cervical lesions.

Material and methods
This was a retrospective review of 411 patients with HPV positivity. The participants were divided into two groups: Group X contained HPV genotypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 68 while group Y contained unclassified HPV genotypes such as 42, 54, 61, 62, 71, 81, 83, 84 and 89. The X and Y groups were compared in terms of demographic characteristics and related cervical pathologies. We investigated the potential of HPV genotypes in group Y to develop cervical neoplasia.

Results
HPV 16 is the most common genotype in group X (28.5%) whereas HPV 83 is the most common genotype in group Y (4.9%). Group X and group Y were statistically similar with respect to age (p = 0.231), parity (p = 0.617), occupation (p = 0.535), marital status (p = 0.644), education level (p = 0.316), smoking (p = 0.352), gynecological findings (p = 0.201), Pap smear results (p = 0.427), and colposcopy findings (p = 0.476). When compared to group X, normal cervical biopsy was significantly more frequent (18.6% vs. 39.1%), chronic cervicitis was significantly less frequent (49.5% vs. 36.9%), CIN 1 was significantly less frequent (12.9% vs. 8.7%) and CIN 2 was significantly less frequent (5.6% vs. 2.2%) (p = 0.012). Cervical cancer was diagnosed in three patients of group X and one patient of group Y (1.6% vs. 2.2%).

Conclusions
Screening programs for cervical cancer are generally performed to detect HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential. The importance of unclassified HPV genotypes should be investigated in large scale studies so that the success of screening programs and vaccination can be improved.

keywords:

cervical cancer, colposcopy, human papillomavirus, unclassified

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