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ISSN: 1642-5758
Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
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1/2022
vol. 54
 
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abstract:
Letter to the Editor

Advice for doctors working or planning to work in intensive care: summation from a qualitative study

Diane Dennis
1, 2
,
Cameron Knott
3, 4
,
Rahul Khanna
5, 6
,
Peter Vernon van Heerden
7

1.
Department of Intensive Care and Physiotherapy, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth 6009, Western Australia, Australia
2.
Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth 6102, Western Australia, Australia
3.
Department of Intensive Care, Bendigo Health, Bendigo 3550, Victoria, Australia
4.
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084, Australia
5.
Department of Psychiatry, Phoenix Australia, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Victoria, Australia
6.
Division of Mental Health, Austin Health, Heidelberg 3084, Victoria, Australia
7.
Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Hadassah Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91120001, Israel
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2022; 54, 1: 85–90
Online publish date: 2022/02/16
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Healthcare personnel who work for prolonged periods in highly stressful environments are susceptible to the effects of these stressors and the cumulative nature of their exposure. The term ‘burnout’ has been coined to describe a constellation of symptoms related to work, organisational and personal issues occurring in individuals with no prior history [1]. Burnout has been described as particularly prevalent in the critical care setting [2–4]; it affects not only the health and wellbeing of those individuals experiencing the deleterious consequences, but also the quality of the care they provide [1]. There is significant literature that supports the worthiness of mentorship [5–7] throughout medical training. Following on from our paper exploring the behavioural responses of intensivists to stressors encountered working in the intensive care environment [8], the aim of this study was to elicit the advice senior intensivists might offer others on dealing with the stresses of a career in intensive care.
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