eISSN: 2084-9834
ISSN: 0034-6233
Reumatologia/Rheumatology
Bieżący numer Archiwum O czasopiśmie Suplementy Bazy indeksacyjne Prenumerata Kontakt Zasady publikacji prac
NOWOŚĆ
Portal dla reumatologów!
www.ereumatologia.pl
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
2/2013
 
Poleć ten artykuł:
Udostępnij:
więcej
 
 
Artykuł redakcyjny

Autoimmunologiczny (autozapalny) zespół indukowany przez adiuwanty – ASIA

Yehuda Shoenfeld, Maria Maślińska

Reumatologia 2013; 51, 2: 101-107
Plik artykułu:
- Autoimmune.pdf  [0.16 MB]
 
 
The purpose of the adjuvant is not only to intensify the humoral immune response, but also to induce a cellular immune response such as of Th1 cells and thereby stimulate the production of interferon γ (IFN-γ). Adjuvants are used in common vaccinations to increase their effectiveness assessed by both laboratory (e.g. postvaccinal antibody levels) and clinical (increased percentage of the population invulnerable to the disease) evidence [1, 2]. The research on adjuvants has persisted since the nineteenth century until the present day. Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) – a mixture of paraffin oil and mycobacterium antigen – was the first to be discovered, with its variation (incomplete Freund’s adjuvant – IFA), devoid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen – also used in the research. Over the many years of research different substances or materials have been tried as adjuvants. For the last 70 years aluminum (Al) phosphate and hydroxide

compounds have been most widely used, although their mechanism of action is still not entirely clear. Al is used as an adjuvant in many vaccines (with the exception of live attenuated vaccines), as it prolongs the time antigen remains in the place of the injection (depot effect), acts as an irritant at the injection site inducing local immune reactions, and activates the complement system [3]. Al is added to other adjuvants (such as polymers), increasing their immunogenicity and thus the effectiveness of vaccination.

There is a wide range of adjuvants of natural origin. These include: cellular wall elements, such LPS and lipid A (in particular in the form of monophosphoryl lipid A), muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derived from Mycobacterium cellular wall (because of its pyrogenic effect, only its synthetic analogs have been used in humans), and nonmethylated dinucleotide sequences derived from bacterial DNA (CpG). Other natural adjuvants of practical importance – in particular for the mucosal response associated with stimulation of the synthesis of specific IgA antibodies – are enterotoxins: cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT). Also diphtheria toxoid finds its application as an adjuvant in vaccines.

Currently the search for adjuvants is being carried out not only among natural compounds, but also among artificial substances [e.g. Syntex adjuvant formulation (SAF) with squalene, a synthetic derivative of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), and the detergent Tween 20]. Water emulsions of squalene (MF 59 stabilized with Tween 80 and Span 85 detergents) are commonly used within influenza, HBV, HSV and CMV vaccines [1, 2, 4, 5].

Research is also being carried out into the use of virosomes, polymers (micro- and nano-particles) and cytokines such as GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), interleukins (IL) 1, 2, 12, or IFN-γ as potential adjuvants.

The connection between adjuvants used in the vaccines and the activation of the autoimmune process leading to the development of autoimmune diseases is being currently recognized. ASIA (autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants) is a new syndrome concerning pathological effects of adjuvant use [6]. The association between a number of symptoms emerging after the adjuvant exposure and previously attributed to specific autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been established. ASIA develops not only in individuals with a history of vaccination, but also as a result of silicone breast implant (SBI) operations, in cases of development of Gulf War syndrome (GWS) and macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF), but undoubtedly the current list of conditions caused by the adjuvants is not exhaustive. In 2011, the criteria to diagnose ASIA were proposed [6]. The following phenomena were considered in defining ASIA syndrome:

Post-vaccination adverse events. Over many years of vaccination case reports surfaced of conditions such as arthritis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, meningitis, chronic fatigue syndrome and vasculitis, being associated with a history of vaccination [7]. Arthritis after vaccination with DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis), transverse myelitis after oral polio vaccination and autoimmune thrombocytopenia after vaccination with MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) vaccine [8] have been reported, while the Haemophilus influenzae B vaccine (HiB) has been linked with the occurrence of insulin-dependent diabetes. The article by Classen et al. demonstrated that in NOD mice (diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic mice) after immunization with HiB vaccine, an increased risk of developing diabetes occurred. Yet, further observations of Ravel et al. did not confirm these findings [9, 10].

As attention has been drawn to the rare, yet possible, post-vaccination complications, research performed on animals revealed the emergence of various autoantibodies, including those associated with SLE (in dogs) [11]. In studies on salmon, oil adjuvant administered to peritoneum led not only to the formation of antinuclear antibodies, antibodies to 2 glycoprotein I (2GPI) and anti-ferritin antibodies, but also to the occurrence of granulomatous disease of the peritoneum and liver as well as glomerulonephritis and thromboembolic complications [12]. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice and rats with pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane oil adjuvant) induces arthritis and antibodies associated with SLE [13].

The retrospective studies also yielded interesting results. In a retrospective study, Zafrir et al. performed an analysis of patients from various centers in the United States who developed symptoms of autoimmune diseases after hepatitis B vaccination, notably the vaccine containing Al. From a group of 93 patients analyzed by Zafrir et al., a cohort of 49 was serologically evaluated and 80% showed the presence of autoantibodies (57% evaluated subjects had ANA antibodies, and 28% had rheumatoid factor) [14].

In the study by Soriano et al. among 20 patients who were diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and po­lymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) (between 2005 and 2010) 10 pa­tients underwent flu vaccination 20 days to 3 months prior to the diagnosis of GCA/PMR [15].

Such results led to the search for the substances responsible for the observed phenomena. Aluminum, commonly added to vaccines as an adjuvant and at the same time present in food, water, air and pharmaceuticals, is being analyzed as a potential factor inducing the de­ve-lopment of Crohn’s disease (CD) [16].

Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a yeast, one of the best known adjuvants, present in many vaccines, e.g. against hepatitis B and A, is also under scrutiny. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCAs) directed against phosphopeptidomannan are considered to be specific for CD; additionally, high levels of ASCAs were found in patients with other autoimmune diseases, including antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), SLE, RA and diabetes type 1, compared to healthy controls [17]. Another suspect is nonmethylated dinucleotide sequences (CpG) as its interaction with heat shock proteins and vasoactive neuropeptides may be linked to the development of fatigue-related autoimmune conditions [18].

Adjuvants and anticardiolipin antibody stimulation. It was demonstrated that vaccination and the use of an adjuvant may result in the appearance of autoantibodies including anti-cardiolipins (aCL). Research performed by Vista et al. established that the vaccination can stimulate anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) formation in patients with SLE and in healthy individuals and there was no statistically significant difference between these two groups. No clinical features of APS were observed. The authors suggested that the increase in the level of aCL antibodies present in SLE patients prior to the use of an adjuvant and de novo emergence of aCL were transient [19]. Soldevilla et al. described 3 patients after HPV (human papilloma virus) immunization who developed de novo SLE or exacerbation of SLE symptoms within a short time after vaccination (2–4 months). However, the study showed that SLE patients had higher risk of developing cervical cancer and also that HPV vaccine is safe and effective in this group [20].

Gulf War syndrome. The association found between symptoms developed by war veterans – known as chronic multi-symptom illness (CMI) or medically unexplained chronic multisymptom illnesses – with the exposure to adjuvants was extremely interesting. Exposure to numerous vaccinations, pyridostigmine bromide (PB) (as prophylaxis of nerve gas exposure), repellents such as DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) and also to pesticides is associated with the onset of symptoms as fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive functions impairment, muscle pain and weakness, ataxia, excessive sweating, headache, fever, arthralgia, diarrhea, and bladder dysfunction. These symptoms are similar to those present in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia (FB), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), sick building syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.

In patients with GWS, symptoms correlated with the presence of antibodies to squalene (an adjuvant used in many vaccines, often together with Al) were observed [21].

Gherardi et al. in 1998 described macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF), which is caused by the deposition in muscles of Al administered together with the vaccine. Besides general symptoms such as muscle pain, arthritis, muscle weakness, chronic fatigue and fever, patients complained of memory and cognitive function impairment, difficulties in maintaining emotions and mood swings. In laboratory tests elevated tyrosine kinase (CK) levels, increased sedimentation rate, and the emergence of autoantibodies have been observed. Electromyography revealed primary muscle damage and muscle biopsy and gallium scintigraphy confirmed seizure of muscles without damage to muscle fibers [21, 22]. The syndrome develops mainly in patients with the HLA-DRB1*01 allele, which explains the relatively rare occurrence [23].

Silicone breast implant (SBI) siliconosis/silicone implant related disease. In women after silicone breast implantation, not only were anti-silicone autoantibodies found but also onset of immune diseases has been reported. In 1996, Hennekens et al. surveyed 1800 women after breast implant, reporting immune disease cases [assessing the relative risk at 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.41)] [24]. The risk of development of autoimmune diseases is also associated with injections of many chemical substances for cosmetic purposes (e.g. mineral oil, guaiacol, collagen, iodine, paraffin) [25]. It has been noted that the risk of morphea type or scleroderma-like skin lesions development or of eosinophilic fasciitis occurrence arises after SBI. It is explained by silicone’s influence on fibroblast proliferation and collagen production [26, 27].

Considering together all the presented research and case reports, the association between onset of the autoimmune diseases and exposure to adjuvants seems to be proved beyond doubt. This conclusion provided grounds for establishing ASIA syndrome.

Among the major criteria of ASIA syndrome most prominent is exposure to external stimuli – such as infection, vaccination, silicone or other adjuvants – prior to clinical manifestations of a disease. The second ASIA criterion is the emergence of typical clinical manifestations: myalgia, myositis and muscle weakness, arthralgia and/or arthritis, chronic fatigue, unrefreshing sleep or sleep disturbances, neurological manifestations (especially associated with demyelination), cognitive impairment and memory loss, pyrexia and mouth dryness. The third major criterion is improvement after removal of the factor associated with the symptoms. The above listed clinical features of ASIA clearly include ones that may suggest the existence of autoimmune disease. The validation of the autoimmune picture of the disease especially in histological findings, after biopsy of involved organs or by the presence of autoantibodies and antibodies directed against the suspected adjuvant (e.g. anti-silicone antibodies, anti-squalene antibodies), is the fourth major criterion of ASIA syndrome [21, 28].

The existence of antibodies/autoantibodies and other clinical manifestations such as irritable bowel syndrome, but also the presence of a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) (i.e. HLA DRB1, HLA DQ B1), as well as the evolution of the picture of the determined autoimmune disease (SLE, SSc, RA, MS), were also included in the minor criteria of the diagnosis of ASIA syndrome.

The occurrence of autoimmune disorders after vaccination is relatively rare, considering the massive numbers of performed vaccinations. As it is in the case of the development of autoimmune disease, certain conditions must be met at the same time, such as exposure to an adjuvant, molecular mimicry phenomenon (i.e. cross-reaction of antigens of microorganisms with the own antigens of immunized individuals) and individual genetic susceptibility, but the influence of environmental factors (infections, exposure to tobacco smoke, chemicals, external pollution) may also be of importance.

The problem of ASIA syndrome is met with growing interest, as the safety of vaccination of patients with auto-inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) is being considered. In 2011 EULAR recommendations for vaccination of AIIRD patients were presented, with vaccinations seen as a vital tool in prevention of infectious diseases, as the risks of infections are higher in AIIRD patients than in the general population; however, live attenuated vaccines should be avoided and vaccination should not be administered during the acute phase of the disease [29–32].

Conclusions. Establishing ASIA syndrome and defining its criteria enables assembling on a common ground autoimmune phenomena associated with the use of adjuvants, despite diverse symptoms presented in the course of these illnesses. This, in turn, facilitates the analysis by the clinicians of previously undiagnosed cases. In the next issue of the journal Reumatologia, different aspects of ASIA syndrome will be discussed in more detail in a separate review article.





Acknowledgements: The authors would like to express gratitude to Professor Carlo Perricone for his support in preparation of this editorial.



Maria Maślińska declares no conflict of interests, but Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld appears in court in support of subjects afflicted by vaccines and silicone implants.

References

 1. Clinical Immunology: Principles and Practice. Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et al. (eds.). 3rd ed. Mosby-Elsevier, Philadelphia 2008.

 2. Grzesiowski P, Hryniewicz W. Immunologia szczepień ochronnych. W: Immunologia. Gołąb J, Jakóbisiak M, Lasek W (red.). PWN, Warszawa 2004; 362-364.

 3. Hogenesch H. Mechanism of immunopotentiation and safety of aluminum adjuvants. Front Immunol 2012; 3: 406.

 4. O’Hogan DT. New generation vaccine adjuvants. In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2007; 1-7.

 5. Israeli E, Agmon-Levin N, Blank M, Shoenfeld Y. Adjuvants and autoimmunity. Lupus 2009; 18: 1217-1225.

 6. Shoenfeld Y, Agmon-Levin N. ‘ASIA’ – autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. J Autoimmun 2011; 36: 4-8.

 7. Evans D, Cauchemez S, Hayden FG. “Prepandemic” immunization for novel influenza viruses, “swine flu” vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and the detection of rare severe adverse events. J Infect Dis 2009; 200: 321-328.

 8. Agmon-Levin N, Paz Z, Israeli E, Shoenfeld Y. Vaccines and autoimmunity. Nat Rev Rheumatol 2009; 5: 648-652.

 9. Classen JB, Classen DC. Clustering of cases of insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) occurring three years after hemophilus influenza B (HiB) immunization support causal relationship between immunization and IDDM. Autoimmunity 2002; 35: 247-253.

10. Ravel G, Christ M, Liberge P, et al. Effects of two pediatric vaccines on autoimmune diabetes in NOD female mice. Toxicol Lett 2003; 146: 93-100.

11. Hogenesch H, Azcona-Olivera J, Scott-Moncrieff C, et al. Vaccine-induced autoimmunity in the dog. Adv Vet Med 1999; 41: 733-747.

12. Koppang EO, Bjerk?s I, Haugarvoll E, et al. Vaccination-induced systemic autoimmunity in farmed Atlantic salmon. J Immunol 2008; 181: 4807-4814.

13. Satoh M, Reeves WH. Induction of lupus-associated autoantibodies in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection of pristane. J Exp Med 1994; 180: 2341-2346.

14. Zafrir Y, Agmon-Levin N, Paz Z, et al. Autoimmunity following hepatitis B vaccine as part of the spectrum of ‘Autoimmune (Auto-inflammatory) Syndrome induced by Adjuvants’ (ASIA): analysis of 93 cases. Lupus 2012; 21: 146-152.

15. Soriano A, Verrecchia E, Marinaro A, et al. Giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica after influenza vaccination: report of 10 cases and review of the literature. Lupus 2012; 21: 153-157.

16. Lerner A. Aluminum as an adjuvant in Crohn’s disease induction. Lupus 2012; 21: 231-238.

17. Rinaldi M, Perricone R, Blank M, et al. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Diseases: from Bread Baking to Autoimmunity. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 Jan 5. [Epub ahead of print].

18. Staines DR. Do cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) fragments induce vasoactive neuropeptide mediated fatigue-related autoimmune disorders? Med Hypotheses 2005; 65: 370-373.

19. Vista ES, Crowe SR, Thompson LF, et al. Influenza vaccination can induce new-onset anticardiolipins but not 2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus 2012; 21: 168-174.

20. Soldevilla HF, Briones SF, Navarra SV. Systemic lupus erythematosus following HPV immunization or infection? Lupus 2012; 21: 158-161.

21. Israeli E. Gulf War syndrome as a part of the autoimmune (autoinflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvant (ASIA). Lupus 2012; 21: 190-194.

22. Gherardi RK, Coquet M, Chérin P, et al. Macrophagic myofasciitis: an emerging entity. Groupe d’Etudes et Recherche sur les Maladies Musculaires Acquises et Dysimmunitaires (GERMMAD) de l’Association Française contre les Myopathies (AFM). Lancet 1998; 352: 347-352.

23. Gherardi RK, Authier FJ. Macrophagic myofasciitis: characterization and pathophysiology. Lupus 2012; 21: 184-189.

24. Chérin P, Authier FJ, Gherardi RK, et al. Gallium-67 scintigraphy in macrophagic myofasciitis. Arthritis Rheum 2000; 43: 1520-1526.

25. Hennekens CH, Lee IM, Cook NR, et al. Self-reported breast implants and connective-tissue diseases in female health professionals. A retrospective cohort study. JAMA 1996; 275: 616-621.

26. Vera-Lastra O, Medina G, Cruz-Dominguez Mdel P, et al. Human adjuvant disease induced by foreign substances: a new model of ASIA (Shoenfeld’s syndrome). Lupus 2012; 21: 128-135.

27. Kivity S, Katz M, Langevitz P, et al. Autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) in the Middle East: morphea following silicone implantation. Lupus 2012; 21: 136-139.

28. Lidar M, Agmon-Levin N, Langevitz P, Shoenfeld Y. Silicone and scleroderma revisited. Lupus 2012; 21: 121-127.

29. Goldblum RM, Pelley RP, O’Donell AA, et al. Antibodies to silicone elastomers and reactions to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Lancet 1992; 340: 510-513.

30. Perricone C, Agmon-Levin N, Valesini G, Shoenfeld Y. Vaccination in patients with chronic or autoimmune rheumatic diseases: the ego, the id and the superego. Joint Bone Spine 2012; 79: 1-3.

31. van Assen S, Bijl M. Immunization of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (the EULAR recommendations). Lupus 2012; 21: 162-167.

32. Bijl M, Agmon-Levin N, Dayer JM, et al. Vaccination of patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases requires careful benefit-risk assessment. Autoimmun Rev 2012; 11: 572-576.
Zadaniem adiuwantu ma być nie tylko nasilenie odpowiedzi immunologicznej, lecz także indukowanie komórkowej odpowiedzi immunologicznej Th1 i tym samym stymulacja produkcji interferonu γ (IFN-γ). Adiuwanty powszechnie

stosowane w szczepionkach mają zwiększyć zarówno ich skuteczność laboratoryjną (ocenioną np. stężeniem przeciwciał poszczepiennych), jak i kliniczną (zwiększenie odsetka populacji zabezpieczonej po szczepieniu przed zachorowaniem) [1, 2]. Prace nad adiuwantami trwały od XIX wieku. Pierwszym adiuwantem był tzw. kompletny adiuwant Freunda – mieszanina oleju parafinowego i antygenu Mycobacterium (CFA). W badaniach stosuje się też jego odmianę – IFA (niekompletny adiuwant Freunda), który jest pozbawiony antygenu prątka gruźlicy. Na przestrzeni wielu lat badań sięgano po różne substancje czy materiały, by uzyskać efekt adiuwantowy. Od ponad 70 lat najpopularniejsze pozostają związki glinu (Al) – fosforan i wodorotlenek, choć ich mechanizm działania nie jest w pełni jasny. Glin jako adiuwant jest stosowany w wielu szczepionkach (poza żywymi atenuowanymi szczepionkami); wydłuża czas pozostania antygenu w miejscu podania (efekt dépôt), drażni miejscowo, wywołując reakcję immunologiczną w miejscu podania szczepionki, oraz aktywuje układ dopełniacza [3]. Jest on dodawany do innych adiuwantów (np. polimerów), co zwiększa ich immunogenność, a tym samym skuteczność szczepień.

Istnieje szerokie spektrum adiuwantów pochodzenia naturalnego. Należą do nich: składniki ściany komórkowej, takie jak lipopolisacharydy (LPS) czy lipid A (głównie w postaci monofosforylowego lipidu A – MPL), dipeptyd muramylowy pochodzący ze ściany komórkowej Mycobacterium (z powodu jego pirogennych właściwości u ludzi stosuje się jego syntetyczne analogi) oraz niemetylowane sekwencje dinukleotydowe pochodzące z DNA bakterii (CpG). Wśród naturalnych adiuwantów znaczenie praktyczne – szczególnie dla odpowiedzi śluzówkowej powiązanej z pobudzeniem syntezy swoistych przeciwciał IgA – mają enterotoksyny: toksyna cholery (CT) i enterotoksyna Escherichia coli (LT). W szczepionkach jako adiuwant ma też zastosowanie toksoid błoniczy.

Adiuwantów poszukuje się nie tylko wśród związków naturalnych, lecz także syntetycznych (np. syntex adjuvant formulation – SAF), który zawiera związek lipidowy – skwalan, pochodną syntetyczną MDP i detergent Tween 20. Prowadzone są próby zastosowania detergentu Tween 20 w szczepionce przeciw HIV. Wodne emulsje skwalanu (MF 59 stabilizowanego detergentami Tween 80 i Span 85) są powszechnie używane w szczepionkach przeciw grypie oraz w szczepionkach HBV, HSV, CMV [1, 2, 4, 5].

Obecnie badania są ukierunkowane na wprowadzanie wirosomów i polimerów (mikro- i nanocząsteczek) jako adiuwantów. Wzrasta zainteresowanie cytokinami, takimi jak granulocytowo-makrofagowy stymulujący czynnik wzrostu (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor – GM-CSF), interleukiny (IL) 1, 2, 12 czy IFN-γ, jako potencjalnymi adiuwantami.

Obecnie przyjmuje się, że istnieje związek pomiędzy zastosowaniem w szczepionkach adiuwantów, aktywacją procesu autoimmunologicznego a rozwojem choroby autoimmunologicznej. Zespół ASIA (autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants) to nowy zespół, którego patologiczne objawy wynikają ze stosowania adiuwantów [7]. Dostrzeżono związek pomiędzy wystąpieniem wielu objawów klinicznych przypisanych konkretnym schorzeniom autoimmunologicznym, takim jak toczeń rumieniowaty układowy (TRU), twardzina układowa uogólniona (TU) czy reumatoidalne zapalenie stawów (RZS), a ekspozycją na adiuwanty. Zespół ASIA może się rozwijać nie tylko u osób uprzednio szczepionych, ale również z silikonowymi implantami piersi (SBI), w przypadku rozwoju zespołu chorobowego Zatoki Perskiej lub makrofagowego zapalenia mięśniowo-powięziowego (macrophagic myofascitis – MMF), jednak listę schorzeń powodowanych przez adiuwanty z pewnością trudno uznać za wyczerpującą. W 2011 r. zaproponowano kryteria rozpoznania zespołu ASIA, z uwzględnieniem poniżej opisanych zjawisk [7].

Objawy po szczepieniach. Od wielu lat pojawiają się opisy przypadków wystąpienia takich schorzeń, jak zapalenie stawów, zespół Guillaina-Barrégo, zapalenie opon mózgowo-rdzeniowych, zespół przewlekłego zmęczenia i zapalenie naczyń, które można powiązać z przebytym szczepieniem [7]. Zapalenie stawów opisywano po szczepieniu DTP (krztusiec–tężec–błonica), poprzeczne zapalenie rdzenia po zastosowaniu szczepionki doustnej polio, autoimmunologiczną trombocytopenię obserwowano zaś po szczepieniu MMR (świnka–ospa–różyczka) [8]. Szczepienie przeciw Haemophilus influenzae B (HiB) jest wiązane z wystąpieniem insulinozależnej cukrzycy. W pracy Classen i wsp. [9] wykazano zależność pomiędzy immunizacją myszy NOD (diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic mice) szczepionką HiB a zwiększonym ryzykiem rozwoju cukrzycy. Jednak następne obserwacje Ravela i wsp. nie potwierdziły tej zależności [10].

Zwraca to uwagę na rzadkie, ale możliwe powikłania szczepień. W badaniach na zaszczepionych zwierzętach stwierdzono pojawienie się różnych autoprzeciwciał, w tym typowych dla tocznia układowego (u psów) [14]. W badaniach na łososiach po podaniu olejowego adiuwantu do otrzewnej obserwowano powstanie przeciwciał przeciwjądrowych, przeciwciał przeciw 2-glikoproteinie I (2-GPI) oraz antyferrytynowych, a także chorobę ziarniniakową otrzewnej i wątroby, zapalenie kłębuszków nerkowych oraz powikła-nia zakrzepowo-zatorowe [12]. Dootrzewnowa immunizacja myszy i szczurów pristanem (olejowy adiuwant 2,6,10,14-tetrametylopentadekan) powoduje powstanie zapalenia stawów i autoprzeciwciał występujących w TRU [13].

W klinicznych pracach retrospektywnych przedstawiano interesujące wyniki. Zafrir i wsp. poddali analizie przypadki pacjentów z różnych ośrodków medycznych w Stanach Zjednoczonych, u których doszło do rozwoju objawów choroby autoimmunologicznej po szczepieniu przeciwko wirusowi zapalenia wątroby typu B szczepionką zawierającą przede wszystkim glin. Z grupy 93 badanych pacjentów u 49 osób wykonano badania serologiczne i u 80% badanych stwierdzano obecność autoprzeciwciał, u 57% badanych były to przeciwciała przeciwjądrowe ANA, a u 28% – czynnik

reumatoidalny [14]. Soriano i wsp. w grupie 20 pacjentów z potwierdzonym (pomiędzy 2005 a 2010 r.) rozpoznaniem olbrzymiokomórkowego zapalenia tętnicy skroniowej (giant cell arteritis – GCA) i polimialgii reumatycznej (polymyalgia rheumatica – PMR) u 10 osób wykonali szczepienia przeciw grypie w czasie od 20 dni do 3 miesięcy poprzedzających rozpoznanie GCA/PMR [15].

Wyniki wymienionych badań przyczyniły się do poszukiwań substancji odpowiedzialnej za obserwowane zjawiska. Glin, często używany w szczepionkach jako adiuwant oraz obecny w żywności, wodzie, powietrzu i farmaceutykach, jest brany pod uwagę jako potencjalny czynnik indukujący rozwój choroby Leśniowskiego-Crohna [16].

Drożdże Saccharomyces cerevisiae są jednym z lepiej poznanych adiuwantów obecnych w wielu szczepionkach, np. przeciwko WZW B i A, również są brane pod uwagę jako czynnik stymulujący odpowiedź autoimmunologiczną. Przeciwciała przeciwko Saccharomyces cerevisiae (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae anti-bodies – ASCAs) są skierowane przeciwko fosfopeptydomannanowi i uważa się je za specyficzne dla choroby Leśniowskiego-Crohna. Wysoki poziom przeciwciał ASCA jest obecny u pacjentów z innymi chorobami autoimmunologicznymi, takimi jak zespół antyfosfolipidowy (APS), toczeń rumieniowaty układowy, RZS czy cukrzyca typu 1 [17]. Innymi „podejrzanymi” są niemetylowane sekwencje dinukleotydowe (CpG) stosowane jako adiuwanty w interakcji z białkami szoku cieplnego i wazoaktywnymi neuropeptydami, które mogą być przyczyną wystąpienia objawów zmęczenia związanego z chorobą autoimmunologiczną [18].

Adiuwanty i stymulacja przeciwciał antykardiolipinowych. Wykazano, że szczepienia i zastosowanie adiuwantów może być przyczyną pojawienia się autoprzeciwciał antykardiolipinowych (aCL). Vista i wsp. wykazali, że szczepienia mogą stymulować produkcję przeciwciał antyfosfolipidowych (aPL) u chorych z TRU i u zdrowych osób oraz, że nie ma statystycznie istotnej różnicy po­mię­dzy tymi grupami. Jednocześnie nie obserwowano objawów zespołu antyfosfolipidowego. Autorzy sugerują, że wyższy poziom przeciwciał aCL obecnych u chorych z TRU przed podaniem adiuwantu i pojawienie się tych przeciwciał de novo było przejściowe [19]. Soldevilla i wsp. opisali przypadki trzech pacjentek po immunizacji HPV (wirus brodawczaka ludzkiego), u których w krótkim czasie po szczepieniu (2–4 miesiące) de novo rozwinęły się objawy TRU lub nastąpiło zaostrzenie choroby w przypadku wcześniej rozpoznanego TRU. Badania wykazały, że u chorych z TRU występuje większe ryzyko rozwoju raka szyjki macicy oraz że szczepienie HPV jest bezpieczne i skuteczne w tej grupie chorych [20].

Zespół chorobowy Zatoki Perskiej. Stwierdzono związek pomiędzy objawami występującymi u weteranów wojennych w postaci przewlekłej choroby wieloobjawowej (chronic multisymptom illness – CMI) lub medycznie niewyjaśnionej choroby wieloobjawowej a ekspozycją na adiuwanty. Ekspozycja na wiele szczepień, bromek pirydostygminy (jako profilaktyka przed narażeniem na gazy bojowe działające na układ nerwowy), repelenty, takie jak DEET (N,N-dietylo--3-metylobenzamid), oraz pestycydy jest powiązana z rozwojem objawów zmęczenia, zaburzeniami snu, pogorszeniem funkcji poznawczych, bólami mięśni i ich osłabieniem, ataksją, nadmiernym poceniem, bólami głowy, gorączkami, bólami stawów, biegunkami, zaburzeniami funkcji pęcherza moczowego. Objawy te są podobne do objawów występujących w zespole przewlekłego zmęczenia (chronic fatigue syndrome – CFS) w fibromialgii (FB), zespole jelita drażliwego (irritable bowel syndrome – IBS), zespole chorego budynku i stresie pourazowym. U chorych z GWS obserwowano korelującą z objawami klinicznymi obecność przeciwciał przeciwko skwalenowi (adiuwantowi stosowanemu w wielu szczepionkach, niejednokrotnie razem z glinem) [21].

Gherardi i wsp. w 1998 r. opisali MMF, które jest spowodowane przez deponowanie w mięśniach glinu stosowanego jako adiuwant w szczepionce. Poza takimi objawami ogólnymi, jak ból mięśni, zapalenie stawów, osłabienia mięśni, przewlekłe zmęczenie, gorączka, pacjenci skarżą się na pogorszenie pamięci i funkcji poz­nawczych, trudności w utrzymaniu afektu oraz wahania nastroju. Obserwuje się zwiększone stężenia CK (kinazy tyrozynowej), przyspieszenie OB, pojawienie się autoprzeciwciał. Badanie EMG wykazuje uszkodzenie pierwotnie mięśniowe, a biopsja mięśnia i scyntygrafia galem potwierdzają uszkodzenie mięśni bez zniszczenia włókien mięśniowych [21, 22]. Zespół rozwija się przede wszystkim u osób z HLA-DR B1*01, co tłumaczy jego stosunkowo rzadkie występowanie [23].

Choroba związana z implantami silikonowymi piersi – siliconosis. U kobiet po wszczepieniu silikonowych implantów piersi mogą się pojawić przeciwciała antysilikonowe, obserwowano także rozwój choroby autoimmunologicznej. W 1996 r. Hennekens i wsp. opisali wśród 1800 badanych kobiet po implantacji piersi przypadki rozwoju choroby immunologicznej [określając ryzyko relatywne jej rozwoju na 1,25 (95% CI: 1,08–1,41)] [24]. Ryzyko rozwoju choroby autoimmunologicznej jest również związane z iniekcjami w celach kosmetycznych różnych substancji chemicznych (np. oleju mineralnego, gwajakolu, kolagenu, jodyny, parafiny) [25]. Stwierdzano również ryzyko rozwoju zmian twardzinopodobnych o typie morphea lub eozynofilowego zapalenia powięzi po wszczepieniu silikonowych implantów piersi, co tłumaczy się wpływem silikonu na proliferację fibroblastów i produkcję kolagenu [26, 27].

Biorąc pod uwagę wszystkie przedstawione badania i opisy przypadków, związek rozwoju choroby autoimmunologicznej z ekspozycją na adiuwanty wydaje się nie budzić wątpliwości. Ten wniosek pozwolił na zdefiniowanie kryteriów zespołu ASIA.

Wśród głównych kryteriów najistotniejsza jest ekspozycja na zewnętrzną stymulację (infekcja, szczepienie, silikon lub inne adiuwanty) przed pojawieniem się klinicznych objawów choroby. Drugim kryterium jest pojawienie się typowych klinicznych objawów: bólu, zapalenia i osłabienia mięśni, bólu i/lub zapalenia stawów, przewlekłego zmęczenia, nieregenerującego snu lub zaburzeń snu, objawów neurologicznych (szczególnie chorób demielinizacyjnych), pogorszenia pa­mięci i funkcji poznawczych, suchości jamy ustnej i oczu. Trzecim głównym kryterium jest poprawa po usunięciu czynnika powiązanego z objawami. Wyżej wymienione cechy kliniczne zespołu ASIA wyraźnie obejmują te, które mogą sugerować wystąpienie choroby autoimmunologicznej. Potwierdzenie obrazu choroby autoimmunologicznej, szczególnie badaniem histopatologicznym po wykonaniu biopsji zajętego narządu lub obecność autoprzeciwciał i przeciwciał skierowanych przeciwko adiuwantowi (np. przeciwciał przeciw silikonowi i skwalenowi) – są uznane za czwarte główne kryterium [21, 28]. Obecność przeciwciał/autoprzeciwciał i innych klinicznych objawów, np. zespół jelita drażliwego, jak również obecność specyficznego HLA (np. HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQ B1) oraz ewolucja obrazu w określoną chorobę autoimmunologiczną (TRU, TU, RZS, stwardnienie rozsiane) włączone są do mniejszych kryteriów rozpoznania zespołu ASIA.

Wystąpienie chorób autoimmunologicznych po szczepieniach, wobec masowości szczepień, jest relatywnie rzadkie – konieczne jest spełnienie równocześnie kilku warunków do ich rozwoju, np. ekspozycja na adiuwant, wystąpienie zjawiska molekularnej mimikry (czyli krzyżowej reakcji antygenów – białek mikroorganizmów z własnymi antygenami) i indywidualnej genetycznej podatności oraz wpływ czynników środowiskowych (infekcje, narażenie na dym tytoniowy, środki chemiczne, zanieczyszczenie środowiska).

Problem rozwoju zespołu ASIA spotkał się z rosnącym zainteresowaniem w związku z oceną bezpieczeństwa szczepień, szczególnie pacjentów z chorobami reumatycznymi (AIIRD). W 2011 r. przedstawiono rekomendacje EULAR dotyczące szczepień w tej grupie chorych i stwierdzono, że szczepienia są zalecane jako zapobieganie infekcjom, których ryzyko rozwoju jest większe u chorych z AIIRD niż w ogólnej populacji; powinno się jednak unikać szczepienia szczepionkami żywymi, szczepienie nie powinno być wykonywane w czasie zaostrzenia choroby [29, 32].

Wnioski. Opracowanie kryteriów i zdefiniowanie zespołu ASIA pozwala zebrać różnorodne objawy kliniczne i zjawiska autoimmunologiczne u chorych po zastosowaniu adiuwantów. Ułatwi to klinicystom analizę trudnych i do tej pory wydawałoby się niezdiagnozowanych przypadków. Szersze omówienie zespołu ASIA będzie przedmiotem odrębnej pracy poglądowej w kolejnym numerze Reumatologii.





Podziękowania: Autorzy dziękują Profesorowi Carlo Perricone za pomoc w przygotowaniu artykułu.



Maria Maślińska deklaruje brak konfliktu interesów, natomiast prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld uczestniczy w sprawach sądowych, wspierając osoby dotknięte niekorzystnymi skutkami działania szczepionek i implantów piersi.

References

 1. Clinical Immunology: Principles and Practice. Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et al. (eds.). 3rd ed. Mosby-Elsevier, Philadelphia 2008.

 2. Grzesiowski P, Hryniewicz W. Immunologia szczepień ochronnych. W: Immunologia. Gołąb J, Jakóbisiak M, Lasek W (red.). PWN, Warszawa 2004; 362-364.

 3. Hogenesch H. Mechanism of immunopotentiation and safety of aluminum adjuvants. Front Immunol 2012; 3: 406.

 4. O’Hogan DT. New generation vaccine adjuvants. In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2007; 1-7.

 5. Israeli E, Agmon-Levin N, Blank M, Shoenfeld Y. Adjuvants and autoimmunity. Lupus 2009; 18: 1217-1225.

 6. Shoenfeld Y, Agmon-Levin N. ‘ASIA’ – autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. J Autoimmun 2011; 36: 4-8.

 7. Evans D, Cauchemez S, Hayden FG. “Prepandemic” immunization for novel influenza viruses, “swine flu” vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and the detection of rare severe adverse events. J Infect Dis 2009; 200: 321-328.

 8. Agmon-Levin N, Paz Z, Israeli E, Shoenfeld Y. Vaccines and autoimmunity. Nat Rev Rheumatol 2009; 5: 648-652.

 9. Classen JB, Classen DC. Clustering of cases of insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) occurring three years after hemophilus influenza B (HiB) immunization support causal relationship between immunization and IDDM. Autoimmunity 2002; 35: 247-253.

10. Ravel G, Christ M, Liberge P, et al. Effects of two pediatric vaccines on autoimmune diabetes in NOD female mice. Toxicol Lett 2003; 146: 93-100.

11. Hogenesch H, Azcona-Olivera J, Scott-Moncrieff C, et al. Vaccine-induced autoimmunity in the dog. Adv Vet Med 1999; 41: 733-747.

12. Koppang EO, Bjerk?s I, Haugarvoll E, et al. Vaccination-induced systemic autoimmunity in farmed Atlantic salmon. J Immunol 2008; 181: 4807-4814.

13. Satoh M, Reeves WH. Induction of lupus-associated autoantibodies in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection of pristane. J Exp Med 1994; 180: 2341-2346.

14. Zafrir Y, Agmon-Levin N, Paz Z, et al. Autoimmunity following hepatitis B vaccine as part of the spectrum of ‘Autoimmune (Auto-inflammatory) Syndrome induced by Adjuvants’ (ASIA): analysis of 93 cases. Lupus 2012; 21: 146-152.

15. Soriano A, Verrecchia E, Marinaro A, et al. Giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica after influenza vaccination: report of 10 cases and review of the literature. Lupus 2012; 21: 153-157.

16. Lerner A. Aluminum as an adjuvant in Crohn’s disease induction. Lupus 2012; 21: 231-238.

17. Rinaldi M, Perricone R, Blank M, et al. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Diseases: from Bread Baking to Autoimmunity. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2013 Jan 5. [Epub ahead of print].

18. Staines DR. Do cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) fragments induce vasoactive neuropeptide mediated fatigue-related autoimmune disorders? Med Hypotheses 2005; 65: 370-373.

19. Vista ES, Crowe SR, Thompson LF, et al. Influenza vaccination can induce new-onset anticardiolipins but not 2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus 2012; 21: 168-174.

20. Soldevilla HF, Briones SF, Navarra SV. Systemic lupus erythematosus following HPV immunization or infection? Lupus 2012; 21: 158-161.

21. Israeli E. Gulf War syndrome as a part of the autoimmune (autoinflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvant (ASIA). Lupus 2012; 21: 190-194.

22. Gherardi RK, Coquet M, Chérin P, et al. Macrophagic myofasciitis: an emerging entity. Groupe d’Etudes et Recherche sur les Maladies Musculaires Acquises et Dysimmunitaires (GERMMAD) de l’Association Française contre les Myopathies (AFM). Lancet 1998; 352: 347-352.

23. Gherardi RK, Authier FJ. Macrophagic myofasciitis: characterization and pathophysiology. Lupus 2012; 21: 184-189.

24. Chérin P, Authier FJ, Gherardi RK, et al. Gallium-67 scintigraphy in macrophagic myofasciitis. Arthritis Rheum 2000; 43: 1520-1526.

25. Hennekens CH, Lee IM, Cook NR, et al. Self-reported breast implants and connective-tissue diseases in female health professionals. A retrospective cohort study. JAMA 1996; 275: 616-621.

26. Vera-Lastra O, Medina G, Cruz-Dominguez Mdel P, et al. Human adjuvant disease induced by foreign substances: a new model of ASIA (Shoenfeld’s syndrome). Lupus 2012; 21: 128-135.

27. Kivity S, Katz M, Langevitz P, et al. Autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) in the Middle East: morphea following silicone implantation. Lupus 2012; 21: 136-139.

28. Lidar M, Agmon-Levin N, Langevitz P, Shoenfeld Y. Silicone and scleroderma revisited. Lupus 2012; 21: 121-127.

29. Goldblum RM, Pelley RP, O’Donell AA, et al. Antibodies to silicone elastomers and reactions to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Lancet 1992; 340: 510-513.

30. Perricone C, Agmon-Levin N, Valesini G, Shoenfeld Y. Vaccination in patients with chronic or autoimmune rheumatic diseases: the ego, the id and the superego. Joint Bone Spine 2012; 79: 1-3.

31. van Assen S, Bijl M. Immunization of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (the EULAR recommendations). Lupus 2012; 21: 162-167.

32. Bijl M, Agmon-Levin N, Dayer JM, et al. Vaccination of patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases requires careful benefit-risk assessment. Autoimmun Rev 2012; 11: 572-576.
Copyright: © 2013 Narodowy Instytut Geriatrii, Reumatologii i Rehabilitacji w Warszawie. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
© 2017 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe