eISSN: 1896-9151
ISSN: 1734-1922
Archives of Medical Science
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Special issues Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
1/2018
vol. 14
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Clinical research

Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the gut microbiome of children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: which strains act as health players?

Valerio Nobili, Lorenza Putignani, Antonella Mosca, Federica Del Chierico, Pamela Vernocchi, Anna Alisi, Laura Stronati, Salvatore Cucchiara, Marco Toscano, Lorenzo Drago

Arch Med Sci 2018; 14, 1: 81–87
Online publish date: 2016/09/06
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Introduction: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), considered the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children, can often progress from non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). It is clear that obesity is one of the main risk factors involved in NAFLD pathogenesis, even if specific mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. We investigated the distribution of intestinal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the stools of four groups of children: obese, obese with NAFL, obese with NASH, and healthy, age-matched controls (CTRLs).

Material and methods: Sixty-one obese, NAFL and NASH children and 54 CTRLs were enrolled in the study. Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were measured for all subjects. All children with suspected NASH underwent liver biopsy. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were analysed in children’s faecal samples, during a broader, 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing analysis of the gut microbiome.

Results: Three Bifidobacterium spp. (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, and Bifidobacterium adolescentis) and five Lactobacillus spp. (L. zeae, L. vaginalis, L. brevis, L. ruminis, and L. mucosae) frequently recurred in metagenomic analyses. Lactobacillus spp. increased in NAFL, NASH, or obese children compared to CTRLs. Particularly, L. mucosae was significantly higher in obese (p = 0.02426), NAFLD (p = 0.01313) and NASH (p = 0.01079) than in CTRLs. In contrast, Bifidobacterium spp. were more abundant in CTRLs, suggesting a protective and beneficial role of these microorganisms against the aforementioned diseases.

Conclusions: Bifidobacteria seem to have a protective role against the development of NAFLD and obesity, highlighting their possible use in developing novel, targeted and effective probiotics.
keywords:

paediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, gut microbiota, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus

references:
Chalasani N, Younossi Z, Lavine JE, et al. The diagnosis and management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: practice guideline by the American Gastroenterological Association, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and American College of Gastroenterology. Gastroenterology 2012; 142: 1592-609.
Polyzos SA, Kountouras J, Zavos C, Deretzi G. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: multimodal treatment options for a pathogenetically multiple-hit disease. J Clin Gastroenterol 2012; 46: 272-84.
Savage DC. Microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract. Annu Rev Microbiol 1977; 31: 107-33.
Turnbaugh PJ, Ley RE, Mahowald MA, Magrini V, Mardis ER, Gordon JI. An obesity-associated gut microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest. Nature 2006; 444: 1027-31.
Ridaura VK, Faith JJ, Rey FE, et al. Gut microbiota from twins discordant for obesity modulate metabolism in mice. Science 2013; 341: 1241214.
Del Chierico F, Nobili V, Vernocchi P, et al. Gut microbiota profiling of pediatric NAFLD and obese patients unveiled by an integrated meta-omics based approach. Hepatology 2016; doi: 10.1002/hep.28572 [Epub ahead of print].
Putignani L, Del Chierico F, Petrucca A, Vernocchi P, Dallapiccola B. The human gut microbiota: a dynamic interplay with the host from birth to senescence settled during childhood. Pediatr Res 2014; 76: 2-10.
Ley RE, Turnbaugh PJ, Klein S, Gordon JI. Microbial ecology: human gut microbes associated with obesity. Nature 2006; 444: 1022-3.
Miele L, Valenza V, La Torre G, et al. Increased intestinal permeability and tight junction alterations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology 2009; 49: 1877-87.
Zhu L, Baker SS, Gill C, et al. Characterization of gut microbiomes in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients: a connection between endogenous alcohol and NASH. Hepatology 2013; 57: 601-9.
Kim SW, Park KY, Kim B, Kim E, Hyun CK. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG improves insulin sensitivity and reduces adiposity in high-fat diet-fed mice through enhancement of adiponectin production. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2013; 431: 258-63.
Boursier J, Mueller O, Barret M, et al. The severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with gut dysbiosis and shift in the metabolic function of the gut microbiota. Hepatology 2016; 63: 764-75.
Metchnikoff E. The prolongation of life: optimistic studies. William Heinemann, London 1907.
Yoo SR, Kim YJ, Park DY, et al. Probiotics L. plantarum and L. curvatus in combination alter hepatic lipid metabolism and suppress diet-induced obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring) 2013; 21: 2571-8.
Alisi A, Bedogni G, Baviera G, et al. Randomised clinical trial: the beneficial effects of VSL#3 in obese children with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2014; 39: 1276-85.
Son G, Kremer M, Hines IN. Contribution of gut bacteria to liver pathobiology. Gastroenterol Res Pract 2010; 2010: pii: 453563.
Federico A, Dallio M, Godos J, Loguercio C, Salomone F. Targeting gut-liver axis for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: translational and clinical evidence. Transl Res J Lab Clin Med 2016; 167: 116-24.
Paolella G, Mandato C, Pierri L, Poeta M, Di Stasi M, Vajro P. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. World J Gastroenterol 2014; 20: 15518-31.
Vajro P, Paolella G, Fasano A. Microbiota and gut-liver axis: their influences on obesity and obesity-related liver disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2013; 56: 461-8.
Hawrelak JA, Myers SP. The causes of intestinal dysbiosis: a review. Altern Med Rev J Clin Ther 2004; 9: 180-97.
Bertelsen RJ, Jensen ET, Ringel-Kulka T. Use of probiotics and prebiotics in infant feeding. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 39-48.
Boltin D. Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 99-109.
Boursier J, Diehl AM. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the gut microbiome. Clin Liver Dis 2016; 20: 263-75.
Derikx LAAP, Dieleman LA, Hoentjen F. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 55-71.
Hendaus MA, Jomha FA, Ehlayel M. Allergic diseases among children: nutritional prevention and intervention. Ther Clin Risk Manag 2016; 12: 361-72.
Lahner E, Bellisario C, Hassan C, Zullo A, Esposito G, Annibale B. Probiotics in the treatment of diverticular disease. A systematic review. J Gastrointest Liver Dis 2016; 25: 79-86.
Lichtenstein L, Avni-Biron I, Ben-Bassat O. Probiotics and prebiotics in Crohn’s disease therapies. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 81-8.
Lichtenstein L, Avni-Biron I, Ben-Bassat O. The current place of probiotics and prebiotics in the treatment of pouchitis. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 73-80.
Ollech JE, Shen NT, Crawford CV, Ringel Y. Use of probiotics in prevention and treatment of patients with Clostridium difficile infection. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2016; 30: 111-8.
Vernocchi P, Del Chierico F, Fiocchi AG, et al. Understanding probiotics’ role in allergic children: the clue of gut microbiota profiling. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2015; 15: 495-503.
Yoo JY, Kim SS. Probiotics and prebiotics: present status and future perspectives on metabolic disorders. Nutrients 2016; 8: 173.
Del Chierico F, Gnani D, Vernocchi P, et al. Meta-omic platforms to assist in the understanding of NAFLD gut microbiota alterations: tools and applications. Int J Mol Sci 2014; 15: 684-711.
Brunt EM, Kleiner DE, Wilson LA, Belt P, Neuschwander-Tetri BA; NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) activity score and the histopathologic diagnosis in NAFLD: distinct clinicopathologic meanings. Hepatology 2011; 53: 810-20.
Malaguarnera M, Vacante M, Antic T, et al. Bifidobacterium longum with fructo-oligosaccharides in patients with non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Dig Dis Sci 2012; 57: 545-53.
Ren T, Huang C, Cheng M. Dietary blueberry and bifidobacteria attenuate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in rats by affecting SIRT1-mediated signaling pathway. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2014; 2014: 469059.
Seki E, Schnabl B. Role of innate immunity and the microbiota in liver fibrosis: crosstalk between the liver and gut. J Physiol 2012; 590: 447-58.
Xin J, Zeng D, Wang H, et al. Preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease through Lactobacillus johnsonii BS15 by attenuating inflammation and mitochondrial injury and improving gut environment in obese mice. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2014; 98: 6817-29.
Sohn W, Jun DW, Lee KN, et al. Lactobacillus paracasei induces M2-dominant Kupffer cell polarization in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Dig Dis Sci 2015; 60: 3340-50.
An HM, Park SY, Lee DK, et al. Antiobesity and lipid-lowering effects of Bifidobacterium spp. in high fat diet-induced obese rats. Lipids Health Dis 2011; 10: 116.
Yin YN, Yu QF, Fu N, Liu XW, Lu FG. Effects of four Bifidobacteria on obesity in high-fat diet induced rats. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16: 3394-401.
Borchers AT, Selmi C, Meyers FJ, Keen CL, Gershwin ME. Probiotics and immunity. J Gastroenterol 2009; 44: 26-46.
Glenny AM, O’Meara S, Melville A, Sheldon TA, Wilson C. The treatment and prevention of obesity: a systematic review of the literature. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1997; 21: 715-37.
Casas IA, Dobrogosz WJ. Validation of the probiotic concept: Lactobacillus reuteri confers broad-spectrum protection against disease in humans and animals. Microb Ecol Health Dis 2000; 12: 247-85.
Wang J, Zhang H, Chen X, Chen Y, Menghebilige, Bao Q. Selection of potential probiotic lactobacilli for cholesterol-lowering properties and their effect on cholesterol metabolism in rats fed a high-lipid diet. J Dairy Sci 2012; 95: 1645-54.
Honda K, Moto M, Uchida N, He F, Hashizume N. Anti-diabetic effects of lactic acid bacteria in normal and type 2 diabetic mice. J Clin Biochem Nutr 2012; 51: 96-101.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
Quick links
© 2018 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe