eISSN: 1731-2531
ISSN: 1642-5758
Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy
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1/2022
vol. 54
 
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abstract:
Letter to the Editor

Case report of successful treatment of clostridial colitis in a child using enteral oxygen therapy

Anatoliy Scherbakov
1
,
Darya Malisheva
1
,
Anna Sukhotskaya
1
,
Ryta Rzheutskaya
1
,
Tatyana Pervunina
1
,
Vladimir Bairov
1
,
Vadim Mazurok
1

1.
Almazov National Medical Research Centre, Russia
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2022; 54, 1: 97–98
Online publish date: 2022/02/08
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Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) has become a serious medical and epidemiological problem with a marked increase in incidence and severity [1]. CDI is responsible for 15–25% of all anti­biotic-associated diarrhea cases, with a considerable increase in the 21st century [2]. Recommended first-line therapy for CDI involves oral vancomycin [1]. Oxygen therapy might be a variant of etiological therapy for anaerobic infection, including CDI [3]. Here we present a case of successful treatment of clostridial colitis in a child by enteral oxygen administration (state scientific project “Investigation of gastrointestinal tract nondigestive functions and the role of enteral oxygenation”). Ethical approval for the clinical usage of enteral oxygen administration was provided by the local ethical committee. Informed consent of the patient’s mother was obtained for enteral oxygen therapy. A child was delivered by Caesarean section at 32 weeks of gestation. The mother was infected with herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infections. Moreover, the pregnancy was exacerbated by chronic placental insufficiency, fetal delay syndrome, and moderate intranatal asphyxia. The child’s condition was critical from birth because of prematurity and respiratory failure, and he received non-invasive respiratory support (nasal positive airway pressure).
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