ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
Current issue Articles in Press Archive Special Issues About the journal Editorial board Instructions for Reviewers Journal's Reviewers Ethical standards and procedures Abstracting and indexing Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 
3/2019
vol. 20
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

Comparative effects of clinic- and virtual reality-based McKenzie extension therapy in chronic non-specific low-back pain

Chidozie Emmanuel Mbada
,
Moses Oluwatosin Makinde
,
Adesola Christianah Odole
,
Olumide Olasunkanmi Dada
,
Olusola Ayanniyi
,
Ayomide Johnson Salami
,
Ishaya Peni Gambo

Human Movement 2019 vol. 20 (3), 66-79
Online publish date: 2019/06/10
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Purpose
The study compared the influence of Clinic-Based McKenzie Therapy (CBMT) and a Virtual Reality Game (VRG) version on pain intensity, back extensor muscles endurance, activity limitation, participation restriction, fear avoidance belief, kinesiophobia, and general health status of patients with chronic non-specific low-back pain.

Methods
This quasi-experimental study involved 46 patients (CBMT: n = 24; VRG: n = 22) with ‘directional preference’ for extension, randomized into CBMT or VRG group. Treatment was applied thrice weekly for 8 weeks. Outcomes were assessed at the end of the 4th and 8th week. Data analysis employed descriptive and inferential statistics of independent t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, repeated measure ANOVA, Friedman’s ANOVA, and ANCOVA. The significance level was set as α = 0.05.

Results
There were no significant differences in the treatment outcomes (mean change) across the groups (p > 0.05), except for kinesiophobia, where VRG led to a significantly higher decline in mean rank at week 4 (28.3 vs. 19.1; p = 0.018) and 8 (28.7 vs. 18.7; p = 0.009), and vitality (a general health status item) at week 4 (27.6 vs. 19.8; p = 0.042) and 8 (28.1 vs. 19.3; p = 0.042). ANCOVA showed that significant baseline parameters were not significant predictors of vitality (F = 1.986; p = 0.070) or kinesiophobia (F = 0.866; p = 0.563) outcomes.

Conclusions
The VRG mode of McKenzie therapy is comparable with the clinic-based approach in most outcomes. VRG has a superior effect on kinesiophobia, but may take a higher toll on vitality/energy.

keywords:

low-back pain, McKenzie therapy, virtual reality

Quick links
© 2019 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe