ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
Current issue Articles in Press Archive Special Issues About the journal Editorial board Instructions for Reviewers Journal's Reviewers Ethical standards and procedures Abstracting and indexing Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 
2/2017
vol. 18
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

Effects of two-week high-intensity interval training on cognition in adolescents – a randomized controlled pilot study

Mari Stenman
,
Arto J. Pesola
,
Arto Laukkanen
,
Eero A. Haapala

Online publish date: 2018/02/26
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Purpose
We investigated the effects of a two-week high-intensity interval training (HIT) on cognition in adolescents.

Methods
The participants were recruited from local high schools with an electronic messaging system. The HIT group parti­cipated in 4 high-intensity interval running sessions and 2 circuit training sessions. The control group (CG) continued their usual habits. Reaction time, choose reaction time, working memory, visual memory, and learning were assessed by computerized CogState test battery. The intervention effect was investigated with repeated measures ANOVA and the effect size by Morris dppc2.

Results
The total of 25 participants aged 17–20 years participated in the baseline measurements and were randomized into the intervention (n = 12) and control (n = 13) groups; 9 people in the HIT group and 10 in the CG also participated in the follow-up assessments. Reaction time (mean change [SD] = 0.02 [0.03] vs. –0.05 [0.08], p for time*group interaction = 0.025, dppc2 = –0.297) and choice reaction time (0.03 [0.03] vs. –0.01 [0.04], p for time*group interaction = 0.017, dppc2 = –0.874) improved more in the CG than in the HIT group. While we found no other statistically significant time*group interactions, intervention turned out to have a small negative effect on working memory (dppc2 = –0.470) and a small positive effect on visual memory and learning (dppc2 = 0.419).

Conclusions
The study on HIT produced mixed effects on cognition in adolescents. Studies with a longer intervention period and larger sample sizes are warranted to further explore HIT effects on cognition.

Quick links
© 2021 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe