ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
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3/2014
vol. 15
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Estimating maximal heart rate with the ‘220-age’ formula in adolescent female volleyball players: a preliminary study

Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis
,
Johnny Padulo
,
Hamdi Chtourou
,
Gema Torres-Luque
,
José Afonso
,
Jan Heller

Online publish date: 2018/04/12
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Purpose
Although maximal heart rate (HRmax) is used widely to assess exercise intensity in training, there are limited data with regards to the validity of age-based prediction equations of HRmax in volleyball players. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the measured-HRmax of two prediction equations (Fox-HRmax = 220 − age and Tanaka-HRmax = 208 − 0.7 × age) in young female volleyball players.

Methods
The study involved 47 volleyball players (age 13.39 ± 2.01 years, body mass 54.0 ± 10.8 kg, height 162.7 ± 10.2 cm) who performed a graded exercise field test (20 m shuttle run endurance test) to assess HRmax. Measured-HRmax values were compared with the Fox and Tanaka prediction equations.

Results
The results showed that mean scores for HRmax significantly differed between measured and predicted values (p < 0.001, ŋ2 = 0.49). Post-hoc tests revealed that Fox-HRmax overestimated measured-HRmax (mean difference 5.7 bpm; 95% CI [3.0, 8.5]), whereas Tanaka-HRmax was similar to measured-HRmax (-2.2 bpm; 95% CI [-4.9, 0.4]). HRmax did not correlate with age (r = 0.16, p = 0.291).

Conclusions
The results of this study failed to validate the widely used ‘220−age’ formula in volleyball players. Coaches and fitness trainers should take into account that the overestimation of HRmax by the Fox equation might lead to prescribing exercise at a higher intensity than what is targeted. Therefore, the Tanaka equation appears to offer a more accurate prediction equation of HRmax than the Fox equation in young female volleyball players.

keywords:

age groups; graded exercise test; cardiac rate; metabolic demand; prediction equations; shuttle run; training intensit

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