ISSN: 2544-4395
Physiotherapy Quarterly
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3/2022
vol. 30
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Is Swiss-ball-based exercise superior to plinth-based exercise in improving trunk motor control and balance in subjects with sub-acute stroke? A pilot randomized control trial

Yagna Khurana
1
,
Manju Devi
1
,
Anujot Kaur
1
,
Thiagarajan Subramanian
1
,
Suresh Mani
1

1.
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Medical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India
Physiother Quart. 2022;30(3):72–78
Online publish date: 2022/09/26
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Introduction
Stroke is the most common cause of neurological dysfunction, associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early stroke rehabilitation is essential for optional functional recovery, particularly motor control of the trunk muscles and balance. The study investigated the effects of Swiss-ball-based and plinth-based trunk exercises for improving trunk control and functional balance in subjects with sub-acute stroke.

Methods
Overall, 20 sub-acute stroke patients aged 40–60 years were recruited and divided into the experimental group (Swiss ball exercise) and the control group (plinth exercise). Upper and lower trunk exercises were performed by the patients sitting on a Swiss ball or a plinth. The 45-minute sessions were applied for 5 days a week for a total of 4 weeks. Trunk Impairment Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, and Functional Balance Scale evaluations were performed at baseline and at the end of the 4 weeks.

Results
The differences between the baseline characteristics of participants in both groups were not significant. After the intervention, there were significant (p > 0.01) changes in the Trunk Impairment Scale total, static, dynamic, and coordination scores, mental status, Modified Functional Reach Test results, and functional balance scores, with high effect sizes in the Swiss ball exercise group.

Conclusions
In patients with sub-acute stroke, trunk exercises performed on a Swiss ball were found to be more effective than those performed on a plinth to improve trunk control, forward and lateral reach, and functional balance.

keywords:

trunk control, Swiss ball, plinth exercise, sitting balance, sub-acute stroke

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