ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
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2/2021
vol. 22
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Is rating of perceived exertion a valid method to monitor intensity during blood flow restriction exercise?

Rodrigo Ramalho Aniceto
1, 2
,
Robert J. Robertson
3
,
Alexandre Sérgio Silva
2
,
Pablo B. Costa
4
,
Leandro Cândido de Araújo
1, 5
,
Julio Cesar Gomes da Silva
1, 2
,
Maria do Socorro Cirilo-Sousa
2

1.
Study and Research Group in Biomechanics and Psychophysiology of Exercise, Department of Physical Education and Sport, Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio Grande do Norte, Currais Novos-RN, Brazil
2.
Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa-PB, Brazil
3.
Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA
4.
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, USA
5.
Laboratory of Kinesiology and Biomechanics, Department of Physical Education, Integrated Colleges of Patos, Patos-PB, Brazil
Hum Mov. 2021;22(2):68–77
Online publish date: 2020/11/15
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Purpose
To examine the concurrent validity of rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (RE+BFR).

Methods
Twelve trained men participated in an orientation session and 2 experimental sessions: RE+BFR and traditional resistance exercise (TRE). Arm curl and leg extension exercises were standardized by the total volume of 3 sets of 16 repetitions at 35% of 1RM for RE+BFR and 3 sets of 8 repetitions at 70% of 1RM for TRE. BFR was applied to proximal positions of both the upper and lower limbs using an elastic knee wrap with a width of 7.6 cm. The blood lactate concentration ([La]), RPE in the active muscles (RPE-AM), and in the overall body (RPE-O) were measured at rest and the end of each set using the OMNI-RES.

Results
In RE+BFR, positive linear regression coefficients (p < 0.01) were found between [La] and RPE-AM (arm curl, r = 0.54; leg extension, r = 0.71) and between [La] and RPE-O (arm curl, r = 0.55; leg extension, r = 0.74). Similarly, in TRE, positive coefficients (p < 0.01) were observed between [La] and RPE-AM (arm curl: r = 0.63; leg extension: r = 0.63) and between [La] and RPE-O (arm curl: r = 0.60; leg extension: r = 0.59).

Conclusions
The RPE scale was shown to be a valid method to monitor and regulate intensity during RE+BFR in the upper and lower limbs.

keywords:

resistance training, energy metabolism, cell hypoxia, sensation

 
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