eISSN: 1644-4124
ISSN: 1426-3912
Central European Journal of Immunology
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
2/2021
vol. 46
 
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abstract:
Clinical immunology

Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genotype and haplotype combinations in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Sylwia Kołtan
1
,
Andrzej Kołtan
1
,
Krystyna Soszyńska
2
,
Karolina Matiakowska
3
,
Małgorzata Morgut-Klimkowska
3
,
Elżbieta Grześk
1
,
Grzegorz Grześk
4
,
Anna Dąbrowska
1
,
Anna Urbańczyk
1
,
Joanna Konieczek
1
,
Jan Styczyński
1
,
Olga Haus
3
,
Mariusz Wysocki
1

1.
Department of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland
2.
Laboratory of Clinical Genetics, 10th Military Research Hospital and Polyclinic Independent Public Healthcare Centre in Bydgoszcz, Poland
3.
Department and Chair of Clinical Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland
4.
Department of Pharmacology and Therapy, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland
Cent Eur J Immunol 2021; 46 (2): 210-216
Online publish date: 2021/08/07
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Introduction
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy diagnosed in children. The factors predisposing to ALL remain mostly unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells are a component of innate immunity. Their role is to eliminate cells that were infected with viruses or underwent a neoplastic transformation. The activity of NK cells is regulated by their activating and inhibitory receptors, inter alia killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). The available data about a link between the incidence of ALL and KIR genotype are highly inconclusive, and further research is needed to explain whether such a relationship truly exists. The aim of this study was to analyze KIR genotype and haplotype combinations in children treated for ALL.

Material and methods
The study included 49 children diagnosed with ALL at 1.2-19.8 years of age. The control group was composed of 43 healthy subjects aged between 1.2 and 21.9 years. DNA was isolated using QIAamp DNA Mini kits. KIR genotypes were identified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with sequence-specific primers (SSPs). The analysis also included KIR haplotype combinations: AA, AB and BB.

Results
Patients with ALL and controls did not differ significantly in the frequencies of individual KIR genes and haplotypes. However, the overall frequency of all 6 activating KIR genes in patients with ALL was significantly higher than in the controls (24.5% vs. 4.7%, p = 0.019).

Conclusions
The findings presented here imply that individual KIR genes do not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ALL. Nevertheless, a higher number of activating KIR genes may constitute a risk factor for this malignancy.

keywords:

NK cells, ALL, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)

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