ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
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4/2020
vol. 21
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Pattern and risk factors of sport injuries among amateur football players in Kano, Nigeria

Bashir Bello
1
,
Usman Balarabe Sa’Ad
1
,
Aminu A. Ibrahim
1
,
Abdulrahman A. Mamuda
2

1.
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
2.
Orthopedic Unit, Department of Surgery, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
Human Movement 2020 vol. 21 (4), 61–68
Online publish date: 2020/03/09
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Purpose
The purpose of the study was to evaluate football injuries and associated factors in male amateur football players in Kano, North West Nigeria.

Methods
A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted among 118 registered male amateur football players aged 16–30 years. The participants were recruited from 7 local football clubs in Kano city. A modified post-season injury questionnaire was used to collect data on football injuries and associated factors. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to analyse the data with the IBM SPSS version 20.0 software.

Results
The response rate was 100%. Most injuries (78.3%) occurred in the lower extremity, with knee injury being the most common (28.3%), followed by ankle injury (21.7%). Upper extremity injury accounted for 13.3%, with shoulder and elbow being the most affected parts (8.3% each). Rough tackle from an opponent (67.2%) was the major cause of football injury. No significant association was found between age, dominant leg, player’s position, and football injuries across various parts of the body (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant relationship between previous injury and thigh and knee injuries. Furthermore, the majority of the players (42.6%) applied self-treatment, with sole physiotherapy (11.5%) being the least frequently received treatment.

Conclusions
The factor most commonly associated with football injuries among male amateur football players in Kano was rough tackle from an opponent, with knee being the most affected body part.

keywords:

football injury, amateur football players, associated factors

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