eISSN: 2353-561X
ISSN: 2353-4192
Current Issues in Personality Psychology
Current issue Archive Articles in press About the journal Editorial board Journal's reviewers Abstracting and indexing Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures



 
2/2019
vol. 7
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

Regulation strategies and their impact on subsequent response inhibition: the moderating role of the self-control trait

Natalia Wójcik
1
,
Edward Nęcka
1

1.
Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
Current Issues in Personality Psychology, 7(2), 132–141
Online publish date: 2019/05/31
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Background
Much research has shown that effortful acts of self-control temporarily impair its subsequent exertion. The aim of our experi-ment was to examine whether this effect, called ego depletion, is influenced by application of certain strategies that help people to overcome impulses. Another purpose of our research was to investigate the role of self-control as a trait in this area. We fo-cused on amusement regulation because of its importance in everyday life.

Participants and procedure
Participants (N = 90) completed the Self-Control Scale (NAS-50) and were then asked to rate humorous cartoons (Task 1) while inducing the following self-regulatory strategies suggested by the instructions: cognitive change, response inhibition, or none (between-subjects manipulation). Subsequently, participants performed the Stop Signal Task (Task 2).

Results
The results indicate that the depletion effect is absent unless trait self-control is included in the analysis. We observed the interac-tion between the self-control trait and the effectiveness of the adopted self-regulatory strategy. Participants with poor self-control did not differ in their performance in Task 2, regardless of the adopted strategy. With the increase in the self-control trait, we observed differences in Task 2 that indicated that the cognitive change strategy guarded against depletion in participants with a medium level of self-control. Participants with a high self-control trait level obtained better scores in both regulatory groups, compared to the condition without any strategy.

Conclusions
We discuss these findings in terms of the competing explanations of the ‘ego depletion’ effect, as well as in terms of the trait versus state approach to self-control.

keywords:

self-control trait; self-control state; regulatory strategies; ego depletion; amusement regulation

Quick links
© 2021 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe