eISSN: 2299-0054
ISSN: 1895-4588
Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques
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1/2021
vol. 16
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Sialendoscopy-assisted intraoral incision approach for the treatment of posterior Wharton’s duct stones: our experience and outcomes

Jin Li
1, 2
,
Xiang Yang Xu
1
,
Zhi Wen Lu
1
,
Qing Bin Guan
1
,
Ju Feng Chen
1

1.
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The People’s Hospital of Luoding and Affiliated Luoding Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Luoding, China
2.
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Affiliated Foshan Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Foshan, China
Videosurgery Miniinv 2021; 16 (1): 249–255
Online publish date: 2020/04/14
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Introduction
Sialoliths can be removed by sialendoscopy in some cases. But sometimes it fails if the stone is located in the proximal or hilum of Wharton’s duct.

Aim
To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the sialendoscopy-assisted intraoral incision approach to remove large stones located in the proximal or hilum of Wharton’s duct, when sialendoscopy alone fails.

Material and methods
Twenty patients with large stones located in the proximal or hilum of Wharton’s duct were included in our study. We used a sialendoscopy-assisted intraoral incision approach to remove large stones located in the proximal or hilum of Wharton’s duct when endoscopy failed. The complications and treatment effect were observed.

Results
The stones were removed successfully in this way in all patients. Two cases had tongue numbness after the operation, and recovered 3 months later without additional intervention. No swelling or pain appeared during the 3-month to 1-year follow-up. Saliva could be observed from the orifice in 15 patients, with little or none in 5 patients.

Conclusions
The sialendoscopy-assisted intraoral incision approach to remove large stones located in the proximal or hilum of Wharton’s duct is effective and safe.

keywords:

sialendoscopy, submandibular gland, stone, Wharton’s duct

  
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