ISSN: 1899-1955
Human Movement
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SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 
1/2018
vol. 19
 
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abstract:
Original paper

The contextual interference effect on the performance of fundamental motor skills in adults

Judith Jimenez-Diaz
1
,
Maria Morera-Castro
2
,
Walter Salazar
1

1.
University of Costa Rica, San Pedro, Costa Rica
2.
National University of Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa Rica
Online publish date: 2018/04/12
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Purpose
The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of contextual interference on acquisition and retention for jump and throw in adults.

Methods
The participants (n = 50) were randomly assigned to 3 groups: blocked practice (BP), random practice (RP), and control group (CG). During each practice session, the BP group performed 20 trials of one skill, followed by 20 trials of the second skill, while the RP group performed 20 trials for each skill in a random order. The CG participated in physical activities that did not include any of these two skills. The intervention consisted of 7 sessions. Skill performance was assessed with the Test of Fundamental Motor Skills for Adults – for pretest, acquisition, and retention. The test has content validity established by logical validity, as well as documented intra-class reliability (calculated via test-retest) and inter-rater reliability.

Results
A two-way ANOVA [group (3) × measurement (3)] with repeated measures in the last factor revealed a significant interaction in throw (F = 5.81; p = 0.001) and jump (F = 10.92; p = 0.001). Post-hoc analyses indicated that the BP and RP groups improved from pretest to acquisition. The CG was statistically significantly different from the experimental groups in the acquisition and retention phase. The RP and BP groups were not statistically different in any phase, both of the skills being assessed.

Conclusions
No contextual interference effect on fundamental motor skills in adults was found. Nonetheless, the results suggest that RP and BP improved performance for both skills.

keywords:

motor learning, distance jump, overarm throw, blocked practice, random practice

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