Postępy w Kardiologii Interwencyjnej
 
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
Wyszukiwanie
2/2012
 
Poleć ten artykuł innym:
Udostępnij:
więcej
 
 

Dwupłatkowa zastawka aortalna z tętniakiem aorty wstępującej – podłoże genetyczne choroby

Justyna Rybicka, Mariusz Kuśmierczyk, Mirosław Kowalski, Piotr Hoffman

Postep Kardiol Inter 2012; 8, 2 (28): 114–119
[Polish version: Postep Kardiol Inter 2012; 8, 2 (28): 120–125]
DOI (digital object identifier): 10.5114/pwki.2012.29652
pliki PDF związane z artykułem:
- Bicuspid Rybicka.pdf  [0.25 MB]
- Dwupłatkowa Rybicka.pdf  [0.25 MB]
 

Introduction

Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart disease. Its incidence in the general population is estimated at 1-2% [1, 2]. There are 3 anatomical types of BAV: with a fusion of the right and left coronary leaflet responsible for 74% of all cases; with a fusion of the right and non-coronary leaflet (24%); and most rarely with a fusion of the left and non-coronary leaflet (2%) [3]. The consequence of BAV is its stenosis and/or regurgitation and the increased risk of infective endocarditis. The defect is often accompanied by an ascending aortic aneurysm. Other congenital heart diseases co-existing with BAV are coarctation of the aorta, interruption of the aortic arch, ventricular septal defect (VSD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and atrial septal defect (ASD) [1, 2, 4]. Inheritance of the disease has been demonstrated. The defect is three times more common in men than in women [1].

Below we present a case of a 27-year-old man with significant regurgitation and moderate stenosis of the bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic aneurysm (thoracic aortic aneurysm disease – TAAD).

Case report

At the age of 18 the heart murmur was detected and after echocardiographic examination the patient was diagnosed with aortic regurgitation. He was referred to the Department of Adult Congenital Heart Diseases of the Institute of Cardiology. At that time he was diagnosed with significant regurgitation and mild BAV stenosis (maximal aortic gradient – GA max 42 mm Hg, GA mean 30 mm Hg). Because of the lack of symptoms and moderately dilated left ventricle (left ventricular end diastolic diameter [LVEDd] 65 mm) with its preserved systolic function (ejection fraction [EF] 73%) and borderline diameter of the ascending aorta (38 mm) a decision was made to continue observation. Over the next 7 years the patient remained under the care of the Adult Congenital Heart Diseases Outpatient Clinic, where a gradual increase of the aortic valve gradient was observed (GA max from 42 mm Hg to 72 mm Hg, GA mean from 30 mm Hg to 40 mmHg) accompanied by dilation of the left ventricle (from 65 mm to 70 mm) and its progressive systolic dysfunction (EF drop from 73% to 60%) with enlarged ascending aorta (from

38 mm to 46 mm) (Table 1). At the age of 25 the patient noticed worsening of exercise tolerance. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated significant dilation of the left ventricle (LVEDd 70 mm) with impaired systolic function (EF 50%) and significantly enlarged ascending aorta

(50 mm). The patient was urgently referred to the Department of Congenital Heart Diseases, but he did not report for the next 2 years. He was not hospitalized until the age of 27 years. At that time the patient’s subjective physical performance was assessed as New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II/III. Physical examination revealed arterial pressure of 140/78 mm Hg, Corrigan’s pulse, systolic thrill in the 2nd-3rd intercostal space, systolic murmur best heard in the 2nd intercostal space (4/6 on the Levine scale) and diastolic decrescendo murmur best heard at the lower left sternal margin (3/6 on the Levine scale). Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed signs of left ventricular hypertrophy and overload (Figure 1). Chest X-ray demonstrated mild enlargement of the heart affecting the left ventricle (cardio-thoracic ratio of 52%), enlarged ascending aorta enlargement and normal picture of the pulmonary circulation (Figure 2). Echocardiographic examination revealed dilated left ventricle (LVEDd 72 mm), significant aortic valve regurgitation accompanied by its moderate stenosis with maximal GA of 64 mm Hg and mean GA of 41 mm Hg and ascending aorta enlargement up to 52 mm (Figure 3). There was also

an additional linear echo in the aortic lumen, which could correspond to the dissected intima and whose presence

was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography

(Fig. 4). The echo was likely a reverberance as its motion was concordant with the heart cycle and parallel to the aortic wall, but because of the intensity of the echo and its visibility in various projections, it required further evaluation. A computed tomography examination was performed to exclude aortic dissection and to fully assess the size and morphology of the aneurysm and its relations with neighboring organs and arteries originating from the aorta. The study demonstrated ascending aortic aneurysm with maximal diameter of 52 mm, excluded the presence of dissection and, as in the echocardiographic picture, confirmed the presence of bicuspid aortic valve with a fusion of the right and left coronary leaflet and calcifications at the margins of these leaflets (Figures 5, 6). The patient was qualified for urgent surgical treatment and underwent the Bentall procedure including implantation of an aortic prosthesis with a mechanical aortic valve (aortic valvular graft, St. Jude Medical 27 mm). The post-operative course was uneventful. The patient was discharged home on day 8 after surgery. Eight months after the surgery he remains in NYHA class I/II.

Discussion

The genetic background of the disease determines the high incidence of BAV. Several ways of inheritance of the disease have been identified. It was found that the abnormal development of the aortic valve and the

tendency for calcification of the aortic valve leaflets is caused by mutations in the NOTCH1 gene [5, 6]. Mutations of the ACTA2 gene cause a contractile dysfunction of the thin filaments of smooth myocytes of the aorta leading to the development of BAV and TAAD [7]. Both of these mutations have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two other syndromes which may be accompanied by BAV are also inherited in the same way: Loeys-Dietz syndrome (mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes) and Andersen syndrome (mutations in the KCJN2 gene)

[8, 9]. Other syndromes which can coexist with BAV and which are inherited in an X-linked form include Turner syndrome and X-linked periventricular heterotopia. Another cause of BAV is reduced production of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) [10].

They most likely lead to distortion of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure. It is caused by improper synthesis, degradation and transport of fibrillin-1, which leads to its deficiency. In the normal tricuspid valve fibrillin-1 binds smooth muscle cells with ECM structures such as elastin and collagen. Fibrillin-1 deficiency causes a lack of support for smooth muscle cells. There is a release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), injury to the ECM including elastin fragmentation, cell death and in consequence the loss of support and flexibility of the aortic wall. These changes in the middle layer of the aortic wall lead to the development and expansion of the aortic aneurysm [1, 4, 11]. The incidence of TAAD in patients with BAV is estimated at about 30-40%, so it is three times higher than in patients with tricuspid valve, in which it is about 12% [1, 3]. Aortic dissection is the most dangerous complication of BAV. It occurs in 2-6% of patients, mostly young and with the presence of BAV regurgitation. It is estimated that aortic regurgitation exists in approximately 20-30% of patients with BAV, while stenosis is present in 60-70% of them [1, 4].

The main imaging examination used in the diagnosis of BAV is echocardiography. In patients without signifi­cant aortic valve dysfunction and with aortic dimension

< 40 mm it is recommended to perform the examination biannually. In patients with significant stenosis/regurgitation of the valve and/or enlarged ascending aorta

 40 mm, the examination should be performed annually.

In our case during 7 years of annual echocardiographic studies there was a gradual mild increase of the aortic valve gradient, left ventricular dilation with its progressive systolic dysfunction and enlargement of the ascending aorta. Due to the presence of symptoms in a patient at the age of 25 years accompanied by significant left ventricular dilation, severe regurgitation and moderate aortic stenosis with ascending aorta enlargement to 52 mm, the patient was qualified for surgery. A comment is required regarding interpretation of the aortic gradient, because of its influence on clinical decision-making. It should be remembered that the transvalvular gradient depends on the stroke volume and in case of its reduction it is helpful to assess the aortic valve area [12]. Due to the high risk of developing TAAD in patients with BAV it is important to assess the aorta.

In our case, both transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiographic examinations showed the presence of additional linear echoes in the aortic lumen, which might have corresponded to ruptured intima. Such echoes require differentiation between dissection and artifact. During the differentiation process it may be helpful to analyze the linear motion of the echo – a chaotic wavy and often flappy motion inconsistent with the cardiac cycle and not parallel to other adjacent structures characterizes ruptured intima. Moreover, in contrast to the artifact, whose

intensity decreases gradually in the vessel lumen, the echogenicity of ruptured intima is homogeneous along the entire course. Color-coded Doppler may also be useful in the differentiation of aortic dissection and artifact. In the case of intimal rupture it will show the separation of flow, while the artifact will not affect the distribution of the color-coded signal. It is also worth remembering that an additional echo seen in the aortic lumen may correspond to an overlapping vein running in the proximity of the aorta – it is usually the left brachiocephalic vein. Also in this case Doppler examination is useful in differentiation. It will show the flow on both sides of the linear echo, but the flow in the aorta will have a pulsatile character and the one in the vein will be continuous. Finally, the ruptured intima should be registered in more than one projection [12, 13]. In the case of diagnostic doubts and the need for detailed assessment of the aneurysm and possible aortic dissection computed tomography should be performed.

The guidelines of European and American societies recommend surgery of the aortic valve in case of severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis/regurgitation or severe and asymptomatic aortic stenosis/insufficiency, when at least one of the following criteria is met: impaired left ventricular systolic function (EF < 50%), referral for another type of cardiac surgery (of the aorta, other valves or coronary artery bypass grafting), end-diastolic diameter (EDD) or end-systolic diameter (ESD) of the left ventricle exceeds 70 mm or 50 mm respectively (this regards only aortic regurgitation), or symptoms appear during the exercise test (this regards only aortic stenosis). The indication for surgical treatment of the aortic aneurysm in patients with BAV is enlargement of the ascending aorta > 50 mm. Replacement of the ascending aorta should also be considered in patients undergoing surgery for the BAV if the diameter of the aorta is 4.5 cm or more [14-16].

In conclusion, BAV is the most common congenital heart defect. It is often accompanied by valvular dysfunction in the form of stenosis and/or regurgitation. As a result of associated congenital abnormalities of the aortic wall, the defect often coexists with an ascending aortic aneurysm. Therefore, diagnosis of BAV, even without its dysfunction, should be associated with regular evaluation of the valve and the aorta. In addition, it is recommended to perform echocardiographic studies in first-degree relatives of patients with BAV.

References

 1. Siu SC, Silversides CK. Bicuspid aortic valve disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55: 2789-2800.

 2. Cripe L, Andelfinger G, Martin LJ, et al. Bicuspid aortic valve is heritable. J Am Coll Cardiol 2004; 44: 138-143.

 3. Jackson V, Petrini J, Caidahl K, et al. Bicuspid aortic valve leaflet morphology in relation to aortic root morphology: a study of 300 patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2011; 40: 118-124.

 4. Davies RR, Kaple RK, Mandapati D, et al. Natural history of ascending aortic aneurysm in the setting of an unreplaced bicuspid aortic valve. Ann Thorac Surg 2007; 83: 1338-1344.

 5. Garg V, Muth AN, Ransom JF, et al. Mutations in NOTCH1 cause aortic valve disease. Nature 2005; 437: 270-274.

 6. Mohamed SA, Aherrahrou Z, Liptau H, et al. Novel missense mutations (p.T596M and p.P1797H) in NOTCH1 in patients with bicuspid aortic valve. Biochem Res Commun 2006; 345: 1460-1465.

 7. Guo DC, Pannu H, Tran-Fadulu V, et al. Mutations in smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2) lead to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissections. Net Genet 2007; 39: 1488-1493.

 8. Loeys BL, Chen J, Neptune ER, et al. A syndrome of altered cardiovascular, craniofacial, neurocognitive and skeletal development caused by mutations in TGFBR1 or TGFBR2. Nat Genet 2005; 37: 275-281.

 9. Andelfinger G, Tapper AR, Welch RC, et al. KCNJ2 Mutation results in Andersen syndrome with sex-specific cardiac and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Am J Hum Gen 2002; 71: 663-668.

10. Aicher D, Urbich C, Zeiher A, et al. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in bicuspid aortic valve disease. Ann Thorac Surg 2007; 83:

1290-1294.

11. Russo CF, Cannata A, Lanfranconi M, et al. Is aortic wall dege­neration related to bicuspid aortic valve anatomy in patients with valvular disease? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2008; 136: 937-942.

12. Feigenbaum H, Armstrong WF, Ryan T. Feigenbaum’s echocardiography. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2004.

13. Klisiewicz A, Hoffman P, Michałek P, Szymański P. Choroby aorty piersiowej. In: Echokardiografia. [Polish]. Hoffman P, Kasprzak JD (red.). Via Medica, Gdańsk 2004.

14. Hiratzka LF, Bakris GL, Beckamm JA, et al. 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Thoracic Aortic Disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55: 27-129.

15. Baumgartner H, Bonhoeffer P, De Groot Natasja MS, et al. ESC Guidelines for the management of grown-up congenital heart diseases (new version 2010). Eur Heart J 2010; 31: 2915-2957.

16. Vahanian A, Baumgartner H, Bax J, et al. Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. The Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J 2007; 28: 230-268.

Wstęp

Dwupłatkowa zastawka aortalna (bicuspid aortic valve – BAV) jest najczęstszą wrodzoną wadą serca. Częstość jej występowania w populacji ogólnej ocenia się na 1–2%

[1, 2]. Anatomicznie wyróżnia się 3 typy BAV: ze zrośniętym płatkiem wieńcowym prawym i lewym (około 74% wszystkich przypadków), ze zrośniętym płatkiem wieńcowym prawym i płatkiem niewieńcowym (24%) oraz najrzadziej pojawiający się typ ze zrośniętym płatkiem wieńcowym lewym i niewieńcowym (2%) [3]. Następstwem BAV jest zwężenie i/lub niedomykalność zastawki, zwiększone jest także ryzyko występującego infekcyjnego zapalenia wsierdzia. Wadzie często towarzyszy tętniak aorty wstępującej. Do innych wad współistniejących z BAV zalicza się: koarktację aorty, przerwanie ciągłości aorty, ubytek przegrody międzykomorowej (ventricular septal defect – VSD), drożny przewód tętniczy (patent ductus arteriosus – PDA) i ubytek przegrody międzyprzedsionkowej (atrial septal defect – ASD) [1, 2, 4]. Wykazano dziedziczenie wady. Trzy razy częściej występuje ona u mężczyzn niż u kobiet [1].

Poniżej przedstawiono przypadek 27-letniego mężczyzny z istotną niedomykalnością i umiarkowanym zwężeniem dwupłatkowej zastawki aortalnej oraz z tętniakiem aorty wstępującej (thoracic aortic aneurysm disease – TAAD).

Opis przypadku

W 18. roku życia u mężczyzny stwierdzono szmer nad sercem, wykonano badanie echokardiograficzne i rozpoznano niedomykalność zastawki aortalnej. Pacjenta skierowano do Kliniki Wad Wrodzonych Serca Instytutu Kardiologii. Rozpoznano wówczas istotną niedomykalność i małe zwężenie BAV [gradient aortalny maksymalny

(GA max) 42 mm Hg, średni (GA mean) 30 mm Hg]. Z uwagi na brak dolegliwości, umiarkowanie poszerzoną lewą komorę [wymiar końcoworozkurczowy lewej komory (left ventricular end diastolic diameter – LVEDd) 65 mm], zachowaną jej funkcję skurczową [(ejection fraction – EF) 73%] i graniczny wymiar aorty wstępującej (38 mm) podjęto decyzję o dalszej obserwacji. Przez kolejnych 7 lat chory pozostawał pod opieką Poradni Przyklinicznej Wad Wrodzonych Serca, gdzie obserwowano stopniowy wzrost gradientu przez zastawkę aortalną (GA max z 42 mm Hg do 72 mm Hg, GA mean z 30 mm Hg do 40 mm Hg), poszerzanie jamy lewej komory (z 65 mm do 70 mm), postępującą jej dysfunkcję skurczową (zmniejszenie EF z 73% do 60%) i poszerzanie aorty wstępującej (z 38 mm do 46 mm) (tab. 1.).

W 25. roku życia pacjent zauważył pogarszanie tolerancji wysiłku. W badaniu echokardiograficznym stwierdzono istotne poszerzenie lewej komory (LVEDd 70 mm) i upośledzenie jej funkcji skurczowej (EF 50%), a także istotne poszerzenie aorty wstępującej (50 mm). Pacjenta w trybie pilnym skierowano do Kliniki, ale nie zgłaszał się on przez 2 kolejne lata. Został przyjęty do szpitala dopiero w 27. roku życia. W tym czasie w badaniu podmiotowym oceniono wydolność fizyczną chorego na II/III klasę według NYHA. Przedmiotowo stwierdzono ciśnienie tętnicze 140/78 mm Hg, tętno Corrigana, mruk skurczowy w II–III prawym międzyżebrzu oraz szmer skurczowy wyrzutowy, najgłośniejszy w II prawym międzyżebrzu (4/6 w skali Levine’a) i szmer rozkurczowy decrescendo, najgłośniejszy w dolnej części lewego brzegu mostka (3/6 w skali Levine’a). W elektrokardiogramie obecne były cechy przerostu i przeciążenia lewej komory (ryc. 1.). W badaniu rentgenograficznym klatki piersiowej uwidoczniono niedużego stopnia powiększenie serca – lewej komory (wskaźnik serce–klatka 52%), poszerzenie aorty wstępującej i prawidłowy obraz krążenia płucnego (ryc. 2.). W badaniu echokardiograficznym stwierdzono powiększoną jamę lewej komory (LVEDd 72 mm), istotną niedomykalność i umiarkowaną stenozę zastawki aortalnej z GA max 64 mm Hg i GA mean 41 mm Hg oraz poszerzenie aorty wstępującej do 52 mm (ryc. 3.). W świetle aorty odnotowano ponadto dodatkowe linijne echo mogące odpowiadać odwarstwionej błonie wewnętrznej, co potwierdzono w badaniu przezprzełykowym (ryc. 4.). Echo wiązano raczej z rewerberacją z uwagi na jego ruch zgodny z cyklem serca i równoległy do ściany aorty, ale ponieważ natężenie echa było silne i widoczne w kilku projekcjach, wymagało ono dalszej diagnostyki. W celu wykluczenia rozwarstwienia aorty oraz dokładnej oceny wielkości i morfologii tętniaka, a także zależności między tętniakiem a sąsiednimi narządami i tętnicami odchodzącymi od aorty wykonano tomografię komputerową. Uwidoczniono tętniak aorty wstępującej o największej średnicy światła 52 mm, wykluczono rozwarstwienie i podobnie jak w obrazie echokardiograficznym stwierdzono dwupłatkową zastawkę aortalną ze zrośniętym prawym i lewym płatkiem wieńcowym. Wykazano ponadto obecność zwapnień na brzegach tych płatków (ryc. 5., 6.). Pacjenta zakwalifikowano do leczenia operacyjnego w trybie pilnym. Wykonano operację Bentalla, wszczepiając protezę aorty z mechaniczną zastawką aortalną (aortalny graft zastawkowy SJM

27 mm). Przebieg pooperacyjny był niepowikłany. Chorego wypisano do domu w 8. dobie po operacji. Osiem miesięcy po zabiegu mężczyzna pozostaje w klasie wydolnościowej według NYHA I/II.

Dyskusja

Duża częstość występowania BAV wynika z podłoża genetycznego choroby. Zidentyfikowano kilka sposobów dziedziczenia wady. Ustalono, że za nieprawidłowy rozwój zastawki aortalnej i skłonność do zwapnień płatków zastawki odpowiadają mutacje w genie NOTCH1 [5, 6]. Z kolei mutacje w genie ACTA2 powodują zaburzenie zdolności skurczowej filamentów cienkich miocytów gładkich aorty, co prowadzi do rozwoju BAV i niezespołowego tętniaka aorty wstępującej (thoracic aorta aneurysms and dissections – TAAD) [7]. Obie wspomniane mutacje dziedziczą się autosomalnie dominująco. W ten sam sposób dziedziczą się również dwa zespoły, z którymi może współistnieć BAV – zespół Loeysa-Dietza (mutacje w genach TGFBR1 i TGFBR2) i zespół Andersena (mutacje w genie KCJN2) [8, 9]. Innymi zespołami, z którymi może współistnieć BAV i które dziedziczą się w sposób sprzężony z chromosomem X, są zespół Turnera i okołokomorowa heteropatia sprzężona z chromosomem X. Wśród przyczyn BAV wymienia się również zmniejszoną produkcję syntazy tlenku azotu (eNOS) [10]. Najprawdopodobniej prowadzą one do zakłócenia struktury macierzy zewnątrzkomórkowej (extra-cellular matrix – ECM). Następuje bowiem niewłaściwa synteza, degradacja i transport fibryliny 1, co powoduje jej niedobór. Fibrylina 1 w prawidłowej trójpłatkowej zastawce wiąże komórki mięśni gładkich ze strukturami ECM, takimi jak elastyna i kolagen. Jej niedobór sprawia, że nie ma wsparcia dla komórek mięśni gładkich, dochodzi do uwolnienia metaloproteinaz (matrix metalloproteinases – MMP), uszkodzenia ECM – m.in. fragmentacji elastyny, śmierci komórek i tym samym do utraty podparcia i elastyczności ściany aorty. Te zmiany warstwy środkowej ściany aorty prowadzą do poszerzenia i rozwoju tętniaka aorty [1, 4, 11]. Częstość występowania TAAD u pacjentów z BAV ocenia się na około 30–40%, a więc jest ona 3 razy większa niż u pacjentów z zastawką trójpłatkową, u których wynosi około 12% [1, 3]. Najgroźniejszym powikłaniem BAV jest rozwarstwienie ściany aorty. Dochodzi do niego u 2–6% chorych, głównie młodych mężczyzn i przy obecności niedomykalności BAV. Ocenia się, że niedomykalność zastawki aortalnej występuje u około 20–30% chorych z BAV, podczas gdy stenoza u 60–70% z nich [1, 4].

Podstawowym badaniem obrazowym wykorzystywanym w diagnostyce BAV jest echokardiografia. U pacjentów bez istotnej dysfunkcji zastawki aortalnej i z wymiarem aorty poniżej 40 mm zaleca się wykonywanie badania co 2 lata. U pacjentów z istotną stenozą lub niedomykalnością zastawki i/lub poszerzeniem aorty wstępującej

 40 mm badanie to należy wykonywać co rok.

W przedstawionym przypadku w ciągu 7 lat w corocznych badaniach echokardiograficznych obserwowano stopniowy, nieduży wzrost gradientu przez zastawkę aortalną, poszerzanie się jamy lewej komory, postępującą jej dysfunkcję skurczową i poszerzanie aorty wstępującej. Ze względu na obecne u chorego w 25. roku życia objawy podmiotowe oraz istotne poszerzenie jamy lewej komory, istotną niedomykalność i umiarkowaną stenozę zastawki aortalnej, a także poszerzenie aorty wstępującej do 52 mm pacjenta zakwalifikowano do leczenia operacyjnego.

Z uwagi na podejmowane decyzje kliniczne komentarza wymaga interpretacja gradientu aortalnego. Należy bowiem pamiętać, że gradient przezzastawkowy zależy od objętości wyrzutowej i w przypadku jej zmniejszenia pomocna jest ocena pola ujścia zastawki [12]. Ze względu na duże ryzyko rozwoju TAAD u pacjentów z BAV ważna jest ocena aorty.

W opisywanym przypadku w badaniu echokardiograficznym przezklatkowym i przezprzełykowym stwierdzono w świetle aorty dodatkowe linijne echa mogące odpowiadać odwarstwionej błonie wewnętrznej. Echa te wymagają odróżnienia rozwarstwienia od artefaktu. W różnicowaniu tym pomocna jest analiza ruchu linijnego echa – odwarstwiona błona wewnętrzna charakteryzuje się chaotycznym, falującym, czasem trzepoczącym ruchem niezgodnym z cyklem serca i nierównoległym do innej sąsiadującej struktury. W przeciwieństwie do artefaktu, którego natężenie zmniejsza się stopniowo w świetle naczynia, echogeniczność odwarstwionej blaszki błony wewnętrznej jest równa wzdłuż całego przebiegu. Przydatne w różnicowaniu rozwarstwienia aorty od artefaktu może być także badanie dopplerowskie kodowane kolorem. W przypadku odwarstwionej błony wewnętrznej wykaże ono rozdzielenie przepływu, podczas gdy artefakt nie wpłynie na rozkład sygnału kodowanego kolorem. Warto również pamiętać, że dodatkowe echo widoczne w świetle aorty może odpowiadać nakładającej się żyle przebiegającej w pobliżu aorty – najczęściej jest to lewa żyła ramienno--głowowa. Również w tym przypadku przydatne w różnicowaniu jest badanie dopplerowskie kodowane kolorem. Uwidoczni ono bowiem przepływ po obu stronach linijnego echa – z zaznaczeniem, że przepływ w obrębie światła aorty będzie miał charakter pulsacyjny, natomiast w obrębie żyły – ciągły. Oddzieloną błonę wewnętrzną powinno się rejestrować w więcej niż jednej projekcji [12, 13]. Zarówno w przypadku wątpliwości diagnostycznych, jak i w celu dokładnej oceny tętniaka i ewentualnego rozwarstwienia aorty należy wykonać tomografię komputerową.

Zalecenia europejskich i amerykańskich towarzystw rekomendują operację zastawki aortalnej w przypadku ciężkiej objawowej stenozy lub niedomykalności aortalnej, a także ciężkiej bezobjawowej stenozy lub niedomykalności aortalnej, gdy spełnione jest dodatkowo co najmniej jedno z następujących kryteriów: upośledzona jest czynność skurczowa lewej komory (EF < 50%), pacjenci są poddawani innej operacji kardiochirurgicznej (aorty, innych zastawek, pomostowania aortalno-wieńcowego), wymiar końcoworozkurczowy (end-diastolic diameter – EDD) lub końcowoskurczowy (end-systolic diameter – ESD) lewej komory przekracza odpowiednio 70 mm i 50 mm (dotyczy wyłącznie niedomykalności aortalnej), objawy pojawiają się w czasie trwania testu wysiłkowego (dotyczy wyłącznie stenozy aortalnej). Wskazaniem do leczenia operacyjnego tętniaka aorty wstępującej u pacjentów z BAV jest poszerzenie aorty wstępującej powyżej 50 mm. Wymianę aorty wstępującej należy także rozważyć u pacjentów poddawanych operacji BAV, jeżeli średnica aorty wynosi 4,5 cm i więcej [14–16].

Podsumowując – BAV jest najczęstszą wrodzoną wadą serca. Wiąże się ona z częstą dysfunkcją zastawki w postaci stenozy i/lub niedomykalności. W wyniku współwystępujących wrodzonych nieprawidłowości w budowie ściany aorty wadzie często towarzyszy tętniak aorty wstępującej. Rozpoznanie BAV, nawet bez jej dysfunkcji, powinno się więc wiązać z regularną oceną zastawki i aorty. Zaleca się ponadto wykonanie badania echokardiograficznego u krewnych pierwszego stopnia z BAV.

Piśmiennictwo

 1. Siu SC, Silversides CK. Bicuspid aortic valve disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55: 2789-2800.

 2. Cripe L, Andelfinger G, Martin LJ i wsp. Bicuspid aortic valve is heritable. J Am Coll Cardiol 2004; 44: 138-143.

 3. Jackson V, Petrini J, Caidahl K i wsp. Bicuspid aortic valve leaflet morphology in relation to aortic root morphology: a study of 300 patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2011; 40: 118-124.

 4. Davies RR, Kaple RK, Mandapati D i wsp. Natural history of ascending aortic aneurysm in the setting of an unreplaced bicuspid aortic valve. Ann Thorac Surg 2007; 83: 1338-1344.

 5. Garg V, Muth AN, Ransom JF i wsp. Mutations in NOTCH1 cause aortic valve disease. Nature 2005; 437: 270-274.

 6. Mohamed SA, Aherrahrou Z, Liptau H i wsp. Novel missense mutations (p.T596M and p.P1797H) in NOTCH1 in patients with bicuspid aortic valve. Biochem Res Commun 2006; 345: 1460-1465.

 7. Guo DC, Pannu H, Tran-Fadulu V i wsp. Mutations in smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2) lead to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissections. Net Genet 2007; 39: 1488-1493.

 8. Loeys BL, Chen J, Neptune ER i wsp. A syndrome of altered cardiovascular, craniofacial, neurocognitive and skeletal development caused by mutations in TGFBR1 or TGFBR2. Nat Genet 2005; 37: 275-281.

 9. Andelfinger G, Tapper AR, Welch RC i wsp. KCNJ2 Mutation results in Andersen Syndromewith Sex-Specific Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Phenotypes. Am J Hum Gen 2002; 71: 663-668.

10. Aicher D, Urbich C, Zeiher A i wsp. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in bicuspid aortic valve disease. Ann Thorac Surg 2007; 83:

1290-1294.

11. Russo CF, Cannata A, Lanfranconi M i wsp. Is aortic wall dege­neration related to bicuspid aortic valve anatomy in patients with valvular disease? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2008; 136: 937-942.

12. Feigenbaum H, Armstrong WF, Ryan T. Feigenbaum’s echo­car­diography. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2004.

13. Klisiewicz A, Hoffman P, Michałek P, Szymański P. Choroby aorty piersiowej. W: Echokardiografia. Hoffman P, Kasprzak JD (red.). Via Medica, Gdańsk 2004.

14. Hiratzka LF, Bakris GL, Beckamm JA i wsp. 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Thoracic Aortic Disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55: 27-129.

15. Baumgartner H, Bonhoeffer P, De Groot Natasja MS i wsp. ESC Guidelines for the management of grown-up congenital heart diseases (new version 2010). Eur Heart J 2010; 31: 2915-2957.

16. Vahanian A, Baumgartner H, Bax J i wsp. Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. The Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology. Eur Heart J 2007; 28: 230-268.
Ten materiał jest chroniony prawami autorskimi. Wykorzystywanie do dalszego rozpowszechniania bez zgody właściciela praw autorskich jest zabronione. Zobacz regulamin korzystania z serwisu www.termedia.pl.
Polecamy
Konferencje:
IV Kongres Polskiego Towarzystwa Lipidologicznego
07.11.2014 - 08.11.2014
pozostało 7 dni
IV Ogólnopolskie Dni Otyłości
15.11.2014
pozostało 15 dni
Książki:
Zespół stopy cukrzycowej
pod redakcją Waldemara Karnafla i Beaty Mrozikiewicz-Rakowskiej



format B5
liczba stron 108
oprawa miękka
 
Intensywna terapia vademecum. Leki w intensywnej terapii

Intensywna terapia vademecum (redaktorzy: Tero Ala-Kokko, Juha Perttilä, Ville Pettilä, Esko Ruokonen)
Leki w intensywnej terapii (redaktorzy: Esko Ruokonen, Irma Koivula, Ilkka Parviainen, Juha Perttilä
Redaktorzy wydania polskiego: Andrzej Kański, Jan Adamski

Format: 132×210 mm
Liczba stron: 640
Oprawa miękka
 
Nadciśnienie tętnicze a nerki. Kontrowersje wokół nefropatii nadciśnieniowej
pod redakcją Jacka Rysza i Macieja Banacha



Format: B5
Liczba stron: 268
Oprawa miękka
 
Cała prawda o e-papierosach

Jean-François Etter, Gérard Mathern

Format: 125x197 mm
Liczba stron: 208
Oprawa: miękka
 
Internet:
Studenci Medycyny i Farmacji
Portal adresowanych do studentów uczelni medycznych w Polsce i za granicą.
Polityka prywatności Polityka reklamowa Napisz do nas Regulamin Nota prawna
Stosujemy się do standardu HONcode dla wiarygodnej informacji zdrowotnej Stosujemy się do standardu HONcode dla wiarygodnej informacji zdrowotnej: sprawdź tutaj
Created by Bentus
PayU - płatności internetowe