Advances in Interventional Cardiology
 
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
Search
3/2012
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 

New methods in diagnostic and therapy
New applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance to guide cardiac resynchronization therapy

Joanna Petryka, Artur Oręziak, Andrzej Przybylski, Jolanta Miśko

Postep Kardiol Inter 2012; 8, 3 (29): 234–238
[Polish version: Postep Kardiol Inter 2012; 8, 3 (29): 239–243]
DOI (digital object identifier): 10.5114/pwki.2012.30403
documents in PDF format:
- New applications.pdf  [1.09 MB]
- Nowe zastosowania.pdf  [1.09 MB]
 

Introduction

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a treatment of proven efficacy in patients with heart failure, impaired left ventricular ejection fraction and wide QRS complex. It has been demonstrated that CRT has a good effect on left ventricular remodelling, and improves outcome and quality of life. However, in 1/3 of patients this therapy brings no expected benefit. There are many variables that may influence the response to resynchronization described in the literature. Among others, the presence of mechanical dyssynchrony of the left ventricle and the amount of myocardial fibrosis assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have been mentioned [1]. The assessment of left ventricular contraction dyssynchrony in CMR is based on post-processing multi-stage data, which makes this method difficult to use in clinical practice. In contrast, evaluation of delayed enhancement (DE), which corresponds with myocardial fibrosis, is a relatively simple and well-documented technique. The CMR study with fibrosis imaging guides the procedure of left ventricular lead placement to avoid the scar. Furthermore, the assessment of the scar enables one to evaluate the amount of viable left ventricular myocardium ready to undertake synchronised contractile activity after CRT implantation. Along with the dynamic development of magnetic resonance imaging technique and better understanding of its clinical usefulness, new applications of CMR in patients referred for CRT have been reported. Apart from previously mentioned methods of dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement assessment, the growing role of evaluation of right ventricular function and scar homogeneity has been shown.

Assessment of right ventricle

The interest of scientists in multi-centre randomized clinical trials on patients with CRT has been mainly focused on the assessment of left ventricular systolic function prior to device implantation and the evaluation of left ventricular remodelling as a result of the therapy. Therefore the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology, which are based on the data from clinical trials, contain only the criterion of left ventricular ejection fraction. Whereas right ventricular dysfunction and its impact on the response to CRT are not fully documented.

The presence of systolic dysfunction of the right ventricle is a strong and independent predictor of death in patients with chronic heart failure [2, 3]. The results of studies on limited patient populations suggest an improvement in functional and volumetric parameters of the right ventricle after implantation of the CRT device [4, 5], while the improvement of systolic function of both ventricles leads to better patient outcome [6, 7]. There have been papers published in recent years documenting the impact of baseline assessment of right ventricular systolic function on the response to resynchronization therapy [8-10]. Significant impairment of right ventricular function may limit the beneficial remodelling of the left ventricle after therapy. However, the interdependence of left and right ventricular contractility and the reason for a different degree of improvement for each ventricle in patients after CRT remain not fully described.

Because of the anatomy and complex geometry, the role of echocardiographic and scintigraphic methods in evaluation of the right ventricle is limited. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance on the other hand provides imaging of the right ventricle in a freely chosen view (Figure 1) and the assessment of its volumetric and functional parameters in a 3D model (Figure 2), which guarantees better precision and reproducibility of the results [11]. In a study published last year [12] it was demonstrated that right ventricular dysfunction assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance was associated with a lack of response to resynchronization therapy and with more frequent occurrence of cardiovascular events including deaths and hospital admissions. It should be noted that there was a wide range of the degree of right ventricular systolic function impairment in patients undergoing CRT, whereas the degree of left ventricular function impairment was relatively homogeneous as it was one of the criteria for the therapy. Therefore, right ventricular ejection fraction was an independent factor distinguishing this population. Lower ejection fraction of the right ventricle was associated with lower ejection fraction of the left ventricle, higher significance of mitral regurgitation and higher mean pulmonary artery pressure. The authors suggest that the right ventricular dysfunction arises in this population in two main mechanisms: either as a result of biventricular impairment of myocardial contractility or as a result of pulmonary hypertension secondary to elevated left ventricular filling pressure and mitral regurgitation. Among patients with the ejection fraction of the right ventricle below 30%, only 20% of subjects fulfilled the criteria of a response to resynchronization therapy.

The disadvantage of cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a lack of possibility to routinely perform serial assessment of the right ventricle in patients with previously implanted devices. However, the evaluation of the right ventricle should become a routine element of complex CMR assessment of patients referred for CRT as assessment of delayed enhancement.

Arrhythmia and delayed gadolinium enhancement

Most of the patients referred for CRT fulfil the criteria for cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Therefore, a significant percentage of implanted resynchronisation devices, around 70-80%, are also equipped with a defibrillator (CRT-D) [13]. However, the advantage of CRT-D over CRT-P (cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker) with regards to the outcome of patients with an implanted resynchronization device is not well documented. It has been proven that implantation of a CRT-P device leads to the limitation of ventricular arrhythmia, reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death and improves the outcome [6]. Also the number of adequate cardioverter-defibrillator interventions is relatively low in this patient group [14]. Furthermore, CRT-D implantation is more expensive and associated with additional risk of complications, including inadequate ICD interventions, than in the case of CRT-P. It is thus essential to develop algorithms identifying patients with a high risk of sudden cardiac death in whom the benefit from CRT-D would be maximized.

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of delayed gadolinium enhancement provides the evaluation of myocardial structure and identification of fibrotic tissue (Figure 3). It has been suggested that the assessment of scar extent and its heterogeneity in CMR enables the stratification of the risk of arrhythmia in patients after myocardial infarction [15]. So far the published studies indicate the key role of the zone of intermediate degree of fibrosis between the normal myocardium and the central part of the scar – the grey zone/border zone [15-18]. A greater amount of grey zone in the scar was associated with worse outcome and more frequent ventricular arrhythmia in patients with coronary artery disease. Recently, a study assessing the presence of scar with its components in CMR in patients referred for resynchronization therapy has been published [19]. It was found that the analysis of delayed enhancement can be applied to identify patients of low risk of ventricular arrhythmia. Those patients are characterised by a grey zone of smaller extent and lower percentage of scarred myocardium or totally viable myocardium in CMR. Furthermore, the presence of a homogeneous scar, that is a scar with a smaller grey zone, was associated with less frequent arrhythmia occurrence than the presence of a scar with a high percentage of myocardium of borderline degree of fibrosis. Interestingly, in the cited paper the extent of delayed gadolinium enhancement was a predictor of ventricular arrhythmia and adequate ICD intervention independently of the aetiology of heart failure. If those results are confirmed in further studies, in the future the analysis of the extent of delayed gadolinium enhancement and certain components of the scar in CMR could enable identification of patients at low risk of malignant ventricular arrhythmia, in whom ICD implantation together with a resynchronization device would not bring additional benefits.

Conclusions

The key to maximise the benefit from resynchronization therapy is adequate patient selection and optimal performance of the CRT implantation procedure. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance may turn out to be a useful tool to guide optimal left ventricular lead placement, to identify high-risk patients due to right ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to support the clinical decision between CRT-D and CRT-P devices.

References

 1. Petryka J, Miśko J, Przybylski A, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Eur J Radiol 2011 Nov 4.

 2. de Groote P, Millaire A, Foucher-Hossein C, et al. Right ventricular ejection fraction is an independent predictor of survival in patients with moderate heart failure. J Am Coll Cardiol 1998; 32: 948-954.

 3. Ghio S, Gavazzi A, Campana C, et al. Independent and additive prognostic value of right ventricular systolic function and pulmonary artery pressure in patients with chronic heart failure. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001; 37: 183-188.

 4. Bleeker GB, Schalij MJ, Nihoyannopoulos P, et al. Left ventricular dyssynchrony predicts right ventricular remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy. J Am Coll Cardiol 2005; 46: 2264-2269.

 5. Rajagopalan N, Suffoletto MS, Tanabe M, et al. Right ventricular function following cardiac resynchronization therapy. Am J Cardiol 2007; 100: 1434-1436.

 6. Cleland JG, Daubert JC, Erdmann E, et al. The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure. N Engl J Med 2005; 352: 1539-1549.

 7. Ypenburg C, Van Bommel RJ, Borleffs CJ, et al. Long-term prognosis after cardiac resynchronization therapy is related to the extent of left ventricular reverse remodeling at midterm follow-up. J Am Coll Cardiol 2009; 53: 483-490.

 8. Field ME, Solomon SD, Lewis EF, et al. Right ventricular dysfunction and adverse outcome in patients with advanced heart failure. J Card Fail 2006; 12: 616-620.

 9. Scuteri L, Rordorf R, Marsan NA, et al. Relevance of echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular function in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2009; 32: 1040-1049.

10. Tabereaux PB, Doppalapudi H, Kay GN, et al. Limited response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with concomitant right ventricular dysfunction. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2010; 21: 431-435.

11. Hudsmith LE, Petersen SE, Francis JM, et al. Normal human left and right ventricular and left atrial dimensions using steady state free precession magnetic resonance imaging. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2005; 7: 775-782.

12. Alpendurada F, Guha K, Sharma R, et al. Right ventricular dysfunction is a predictor of non-response and clinical outcome following cardiac resynchronization therapy. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2011; 13: 68.

13. Dickstein K, Bogale N, Priori S, et al. The European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey. Eur Heart J 2009; 30: 2450-2460.

14. Saxon LA, Bristow MR, Boehmer J, et al. Predictors of sudden cardiac death and appropriate shock in the comparison of medical therapy, pacing, and defibrillation in heart failure (COMPANION) trial. Circulation 2006; 114: 2766-2772.

15. Roes SD, Borleffs CJW, van der Geest RJ, et al. Infarct tissue heterogeneity assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI predicts spontaneous ventricular arrhythmia in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2009; 2: 183-190.

16. Yan AT, Shayne AJ, Brown KA, et al. Characterization of the peri-infarct zone by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful predictor of post-myocardial infarction mortality. Circulation 2006; 114: 32-39.

17. Schmidt A, Azevedo CF, Cheng A, et al. Infarct tissue heterogeneity by magnetic resonance imaging identifies enhanced cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Circulation 2007; 115: 2006-2014.

18. Heidary S, Patel H, Chung J, et al. Quantitative tissue characterization of infarct core and border zone in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy by magnetic resonance is associated with future cardiovascular events. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55: 2762-2768.

19. Fernández-Armenta J, Berruezo A, Mont L, et al. Use of myocardial scar characterization to predict ventricular arrhythmia in cardiac resynchronization therapy. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2012; 5: 111-121.

Wstęp

Terapia resynchronizująca (cardiac resynchronization therapy – CRT) jest leczeniem o udowodnionej skuteczności u pacjentów z niewydolnością serca, obniżoną frakcją wyrzutową lewej komory i szerokimi zespołami QRS. Wykazano, że implantacja CRT korzystnie wpływa na przebudowę lewej komory, poprawia rokowanie i jakość życia pacjentów. U około 1/3 pacjentów terapia ta nie przynosi jednak spodziewanych korzyści. W piśmiennictwie opisywano wiele czynników mających wpływ na odpowiedź na leczenie resynchronizujące. Wśród nich wymienia się obecność cech mechanicznej dyssychronii lewej komory oraz rozległość włóknienia mięśnia sercowego ocenianą w badaniu metodą rezonansu magnetycznego serca (cardiac magnetic resonance – CMR) [1]. Ocena dyssynchronii skurczu lewej komory w CMR opiera się na wieloetapowej analizie danych, co czyni tę metodę uciążliwą w praktyce klinicznej. Ocena późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego (delayed enhancement – DE) odpowiadającego włóknieniu mięśnia sercowego jest natomiast techniką prostą i sprawdzoną. Badanie metodą CMR z oceną włóknienia pomaga zaplanować zabieg wszczepienia elektrody lewokomorowej tak, aby wybrać jej optymalne położenie w oddaleniu od blizny. Ponadto ocena rozległości pozawałowego uszkodzenia lewej komory pozwala ocenić ilość żywotnego miokardium zdolnego do podjęcia zsynchronizowanej czynności skurczowej lewej komory po wszczepieniu CRT. Wraz z dynamicznym rozwojem techniki obrazowania rezonansu magnetycznego i coraz lepszym rozumieniem jej przydatności klinicznej w piśmiennictwie pojawiają się doniesienia o nowych zastosowaniach CMR u pacjentów kwalifikowanych do CRT. Poza powyżej wymienionymi metodami oceny dyssynchronii i rozległości późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego coraz większą rolę odgrywają ocena czynności skurczowej prawej komory oraz struktury mięśnia sercowego pod kątem homogenności obszarów włóknienia.

Ocena prawej komory

W wieloośrodkowych badaniach klinicznych z randomizacją u pacjentów z CRT zainteresowanie badaczy skupiało się przede wszystkim na ocenie czynności skurczowej lewej komory przed zabiegiem i ocenie jej przebudowy jako wyniku leczenia. Dlatego też zalecenia Europejskiego Towarzystwa Kardiologicznego, które powstają na podstawie danych z badań klinicznych, zawierają kryteria dotyczące frakcji wyrzutowej jedynie lewej komory. Dysfunkcja skurczowa prawej komory oraz jej wypływ na odpowiedź resynchronizującą jest dotąd słabiej zbadana.

Obecność dysfunkcji skurczowej prawej komory jest silnym i niezależnym czynnikiem predykcyjnym zgonu u pacjentów z przewlekłą niewydolnością serca [2, 3]. Wyniki badań w mniejszych populacjach chorych wskazują na poprawę parametrów objętościowych i funkcjonalnych prawej komory po wszczepieniu układu resynchronizującego [4, 5], natomiast poprawa czynności skurczowej obu komór prowadzi do poprawy rokowania pacjentów [6, 7]. W ostatnich latach opublikowano prace dokumentujące wpływ wyjściowej oceny czynności skurczowej prawej komory na wynik leczenia resynchronizującego [8–10]. Znaczne upośledzenie czynności skurczowej prawej komory może ograniczyć korzystną przebudowę lewej komory w wyniku zastosowanego leczenia. Niemniej współzależność kurczliwości prawej i lewej komory oraz przyczyny, dla których stopień poprawy kurczliwości jest różny dla obu komór u pacjentów z CRT, pozostają nie w pełni udokumentowane.

Z uwagi na położenie anatomiczne i złożoną geometrię metody echokardiograficzne i scyntygraficzne w ocenie prawej komory mają ograniczenia. Rezonans magnetyczny serca pozwala na obrazowanie prawej komory w dowolnie wybranej płaszczyźnie (ryc. 1.) i ocenę jej parametrów objętościowych i czynnościowych w modelu trójwymiarowym (ryc. 2.), co gwarantuje większą dokładność i powtarzalność wyników [11]. W opublikowanej w ubiegłym roku pracy [12] wykazano, że dysfunkcja prawej komory oceniana w badaniu CMR wiązała się z brakiem odpowiedzi na leczenie resynchronizujące oraz z częstszym występowaniem zdarzeń sercowo-naczyniowych, w tym zgonów i hospitalizacji. Warto zauważyć, że u pacjentów poddawanych zabiegowi wszczepienia CRT występowało duże zróżnicowanie stopnia upośledzenia czynności skurczowej prawej komory przy dość jednolitym stopniu uszkodzenia komory lewej, będącym kryterium kwalifikacji do leczenia. Dlatego też frakcja wyrzutowa prawej komory była niezależnym czynnikiem różnicującym tę populację. Niższa frakcja wyrzutowa prawej komory wiązała się z niższą frakcją wyrzutową lewej komory, wyższym stopniem istotności niedomykalności mitralnej i wyższym średnim ciśnieniem w tętnicy płucnej. Autorzy sugerują, że dysfunkcja prawej komory powstaje w tej populacji w dwóch głównych mechanizmach: albo wskutek obukomorowego uszkodzenia kurczliwości mięśnia sercowego, albo wskutek nadciśnienia płucnego wtórnego do podwyższonego ciśnienia napełniania lewej komory i niedomykalności mitralnej. Wśród pacjentów z frakcją wyrzutową prawej komory poniżej 30% odsetek osób spełniających kryteria odpowiedzi na leczenie resynchronizujące wyniósł zaledwie 20%.

Brak możliwości seryjnej oceny prawej komory u pacjentów z wcześniej wszczepionym urządzeniem resynchronizującym jest niedogodnością metody rezonansu magnetycznego. Niewątpliwie ocena prawej komory w rezonansie magnetycznym powinna się stać stałym elementem kompleksowej oceny pacjentów kwalifikowanych do CRT, obok oceny rozległości włóknienia mięśnia sercowego.

Zaburzenia rytmu serca a rozległość późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego

U większości pacjentów kwalifikowanych do CRT stwierdza się również wskazania do implantacji kardiowertera-defibrylatora (implantable cardioverter defibrillator – ICD). Dlatego też znaczny odsetek wszczepianych urządzeń resynchronizujących, tj. 70–80%, ma też funkcję defibrylującą (CRT-D) [13]. Niemniej przewaga CRT-D nad CRT-P pod kątem rokowania pacjentów ze wszczepionym układem resynchronizującym nie jest dobrze udokumentowana. Udowodniono, że implantacja CRT-P prowadzi do ograniczenia komorowych zaburzeń rytmu, zmniejsza ryzyko nagłego zgonu z przyczyn sercowych i poprawia rokowanie [6]. Tym samym liczba adekwatnych interwencji kardiowertera-defibrylatora jest relatywnie mała w tej grupie pacjentów [14]. Ponadto koszty implantacji CRT-D są znacznie wyższe niż CRT-P i wiąże się ona z możliwością wystąpienia dodatkowych powikłań, w tym nieadekwatnych wyładowań ICD. Konieczne jest rozwinięcie algorytmów identyfikujących pacjentów z wysokim ryzykiem nagłego zgonu sercowego, u których korzyści z CRT-D byłyby najwyższe.

Rezonans magnetyczny serca z zastosowaniem techniki późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego pozwala na ocenę strukturalną mięśnia sercowego i identyfikację obszarów włóknienia (ryc. 3.). Sugeruje się, że ocena rozległości blizny i jej heterogeniczności w CMR pozwala na stratyfikację ryzyka wystąpienia zaburzeń rytmu u pacjentów po przebytym zawale mięśnia sercowego [15]. W opublikowanych dotąd pracach wskazuje się na istotną rolę obszarów o pośrednim stopniu włóknienia pomiędzy prawidłowym miokardium a centralną częścią blizny, czyli tzw. szarej strefy okołozawałowej (grey zone, border zone) [15–18]. Rozległość strefy okołozawałowej w bliźnie wiązała się z gorszym rokowaniem i częstszym występowaniem arytmii komorowych u pacjentów z chorobą wieńcową. W ostatnim czasie opublikowano pracę, w której oceniano obecność blizny z jej poszczególnymi komponentami w CMR u pacjentów kwalifikowanych do terapii resynchronizującej [19]. Wykazano w niej, że analiza późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego pozwala na identyfikację pacjentów z niskim ryzykiem wystąpienia komorowych zaburzeń rytmu, którzy charakteryzują się mniejszą rozległością strefy okołozawałowej, małym odsetkiem zmienionego miokardium lub całkowitym brakiem blizny w CMR. Ponadto obecność blizny homogennej, czyli mającej mniejszą strefę okołozawałową, wiązała się z rzadszym występowaniem arytmii niż obecność blizny z dużym odsetkiem miokardium o pośrednim stopniu włóknienia. Interesujący wydaje się fakt, że w cytowanej pracy rozległość późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego była czynnikiem predykcyjnym wystąpienia arytmii komorowej i adekwatnego wyładowania ICD, niezależnie od etiologii niewydolności serca. Jeśli wyniki te potwierdzą się w kolejnych badaniach, w przyszłości analiza rozległości późnego wzmocnienia pokontrastowego i poszczególnych komponentów blizny w CMR pozwoli na identyfikację pacjentów niskiego ryzyka wystąpienia złośliwych arytmii komorowych, u których implantacja ICD wraz z układem resynchronizującym nie wiązałaby się z dodatkowymi korzyściami.

Podsumowanie

Kluczem do maksymalizowania korzyści z leczenia resynchronizującego jest odpowiedni dobór pacjentów i optymalne przeprowadzenie zabiegu wszczepienia CRT. Rezonans magnetyczny serca może się okazać przydatnym narzędziem precyzującym optymalną lokalizację elektrody lewokomorowej, określającym grupę pacjentów z wyższym ryzykiem z uwagi na dysfunkcję skurczową prawej komory i wspomagającym decyzję klinicysty o wyborze pomiędzy urządzeniami typu CRT-D a CRT-P.

Piśmiennictwo

 1. Petryka J, Miśko J, Przybylski A i wsp. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Eur J Radiol 2011 Nov 4.

 2. de Groote P, Millaire A, Foucher-Hossein C i wsp. Right ventricular ejection fraction is an independent predictor of survival in patients with moderate heart failure. J Am Coll Cardiol 1998; 32: 948-954.

 3. Ghio S, Gavazzi A, Campana C i wsp. Independent and additive prognostic value of right ventricular systolic function and pulmonary artery pressure in patients with chronic heart failure. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001; 37: 183-188.

 4. Bleeker GB, Schalij MJ, Nihoyannopoulos P i wsp. Left ventricular dyssynchrony predicts right ventricular remodeling after cardiac resynchronization therapy. J Am Coll Cardiol 2005; 46: 2264-2269.

 5. Rajagopalan N, Suffoletto MS, Tanabe M i wsp. Right ventricular function following cardiac resynchronization therapy. Am J Cardiol 2007; 100: 1434-1436.

 6. Cleland JG, Daubert JC, Erdmann E i wsp. The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure. N Engl J Med 2005; 352: 1539-1549.

 7. Ypenburg C, Van Bommel RJ, Borleffs CJ i wsp. Long-term prognosis after cardiac resynchronization therapy is related to the extent of left ventricular reverse remodeling at midterm follow-up. J Am Coll Cardiol 2009; 53: 483-490.

 8. Field ME, Solomon SD, Lewis EF i wsp. Right ventricular dysfunction and adverse outcome in patients with advanced heart failure. J Card Fail 2006; 12: 616-620.

 9. Scuteri L, Rordorf R, Marsan NA i wsp. Relevance of echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular function in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2009; 32: 1040-1049.

10. Tabereaux PB, Doppalapudi H, Kay GN i wsp. Limited response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with concomitant right ventricular dysfunction. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2010; 21: 431-435.

11. Hudsmith LE, Petersen SE, Francis JM i wsp. Normal human left and right ventricular and left atrial dimensions using steady state free precession magnetic resonance imaging. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2005; 7: 775-782.

12. Alpendurada F, Guha K, Sharma R i wsp. Right ventricular dysfunction is a predictor of non-response and clinical outcome following cardiac resynchronization therapy. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2011; 13: 68.

13. Dickstein K, Bogale N, Priori S i wsp. The European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey. Eur Heart J 2009; 30: 2450-2460.

14. Saxon LA, Bristow MR, Boehmer J i wsp. Predictors of sudden cardiac death and appropriate shock in the comparison of medical therapy, pacing, and defibrillation in heart failure (COMPANION) trial. Circulation 2006; 114: 2766-2772.

15. Roes SD, Borleffs CJW, van der Geest RJ i wsp. Infarct tissue heterogeneity assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI predicts spontaneous ventricular arrhythmia in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2009; 2: 183-190.

16. Yan AT, Shayne AJ, Brown KA i wsp. Characterization of the peri-infarct zone by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful predictor of post-myocardial infarction mortality. Circulation 2006; 114: 32-39.

17. Schmidt A, Azevedo CF, Cheng A i wsp. Infarct tissue heterogeneity by magnetic resonance imaging identifies enhanced cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Circulation 2007; 115: 2006-2014.

18. Heidary S, Patel H, Chung J i wsp. Quantitative tissue characterization of infarct core and border zone in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy by magnetic resonance is associated with future cardiovascular events. J Am Coll Cardiol 2010; 55:

2762-2768.

19. Fernández-Armenta J, Berruezo A, Mont L i wsp. Use of myocardial scar characterization to predict ventricular arrhythmia in cardiac resynchronization therapy. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2012; 5: 111-121.
Ten materiał jest chroniony prawami autorskimi. Wykorzystywanie do dalszego rozpowszechniania bez zgody właściciela praw autorskich jest zabronione. Zobacz regulamin korzystania z serwisu www.termedia.pl.
Featured products
Conferences:
IV Kongres Polskiego Towarzystwa Lipidologicznego
07.11.2014 - 08.11.2014
pozostało 13 dni
IV Ogólnopolskie Dni Otyłości
15.11.2014
pozostało 21 dni
Books:
Zespół stopy cukrzycowej
pod redakcją Waldemara Karnafla i Beaty Mrozikiewicz-Rakowskiej



format B5
liczba stron 108
oprawa miękka
 
Intensywna terapia vademecum. Leki w intensywnej terapii

Intensywna terapia vademecum (redaktorzy: Tero Ala-Kokko, Juha Perttilä, Ville Pettilä, Esko Ruokonen)
Leki w intensywnej terapii (redaktorzy: Esko Ruokonen, Irma Koivula, Ilkka Parviainen, Juha Perttilä
Redaktorzy wydania polskiego: Andrzej Kański, Jan Adamski

Format: 132×210 mm
Liczba stron: 640
Oprawa miękka
 
Cała prawda o e-papierosach

Jean-François Etter, Gérard Mathern

Format: 125x197 mm
Liczba stron: 208
Oprawa: miękka
 
Przewodnik praktyczny jak stosować statyny
Ragavendra R. Baliga

redaktor wydania polskiego prof. nadzw. dr hab. Maciej Banach



Format: kieszonkowy 110 x 190
Liczba stron 92
Oprawa miękka
 
Internet:
Studenci Medycyny i Farmacji
Portal adresowanych do studentów uczelni medycznych w Polsce i za granicą.
Copyright notice Privacy policy Advertising policy Contact us
Stosujemy się do standardu HONcode dla wiarygodnej informacji zdrowotnej This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here
Created by Bentus
PayU - płatności internetowe