eISSN: 2299-0046
ISSN: 1642-395X
Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii
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SCImago Journal & Country Rank
2/2020
vol. 37
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Skin incision versusl aser – the influence of different techniques on scar formation and lymphatic drainage in rats. A preliminary report

Norbert Czapla
1
,
Katarzyna Grocholewicz
2
,
Ewa Sobolewska
3
,
Jan Petriczko
1
,
Piotr Bargiel
1
,
Zofia Polakowska
4
,
Piotr Prowans
1

1.
Department of Plastic, Endocrine and General Surgery, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
2.
Department of Integrated Dentistry, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
3.
Department of Prosthodontics, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
4.
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
Adv Dermatol Allergol 2020; XXXVII (2): 269–271
Online publish date: 2019/03/11
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Introduction
The constantly rising number of skin malignancies and increasing cancer awareness encourage more people to visit outpatient clinics in order to have various skin lesions removed. Despite the fact that scarring is a physiological response to any excision procedure, minimizing the size of it is a goal of every good practitioner. Therefore the question arises whether different techniques used to remove skin lesions may impact the formation and quality of skin scars.

Aim
To perform an evaluation of skin scars formed by laser and surgical incisions and their influence on lymphatic outflow in rats.

Material and methods
Five male rats were used. Using methylene blue, the migration of dye through lymphatic channels of the lower extremity was measured. Afterwards, transverse incisions were made distally using laser and a surgical blade. Wounds were left to heal by secondary intention. After 4 weeks dye migration assessment was repeated and tissue samples were obtained for microscopic evaluation.

Results
Wounds after surgical incisions healed entirely. Wounds after laser treatment had not healed, with a visible area of granulation tissue and hair loss. Significantly worse dye migration was observed in rat extremities after laser therapy than after surgical incision (p = 0.007).

Conclusions
The results of the study show that the size of the scar can depend on the incision technique used. Larger scars after laser therapy limit the lymphatic flow of the skin, which may have an adverse effect on mapping sentinel lymph nodes. However, this hypothesis requires further research.

keywords:

scar, laser, skin cancer, lymphatic drainage

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