eISSN: 2299-0046
ISSN: 1642-395X
Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Journal's reviewers Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
5/2020
vol. 37
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

Skin lesions caused by Orthopoxvirus in children

Katarzyna Mazur-Melewska
1
,
Ilona Pieczonka-Ruszkowska
1, 2
,
Krystyna Szpura
1
,
Agnieszka Myszkowska-Torz
1
,
Anna Mania
1
,
Paweł Kemnitz
1
,
Wojciech Służewski
1
,
Magdalena Figlerowicz
1

1.
Department of Infectious Diseases and Child Neurology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
2.
Department of Clinical Auxology and Paediatric Nursing, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
Adv Dermatol Allergol 2020; XXXVII (5): 695-699
Online publish date: 2019/08/22
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Introduction
The global eradication of smallpox and abandonment of mandatory smallpox vaccination has led to an increased proportion of the population who are immunologically naïve to infections caused by Orthopoxviruses (OPV).

Aim
To present the different courses of OPV infection in children and to highlight the diagnostic difficulties in their differentiation from the other inflammatory processes.

Material and methods
We retrospectively evaluated the medical documentation of 5 children with OPV infection. Clinical diagnosis of OPV infection was based on evaluation of animal contact and skin symptoms, characterised by either a single ulcer or disseminated lesions. In all five cases, blood samples and skin swabs were collected from the lesion(s) to identify specific OPV DNA fragments (Vgf, b9R and D11L genes) using PCR.

Results
Two children presented with high fever, a single ulcer on the skin and local lymphadenopathy. The three other patients were in good general health and their skin lesions presented as a disseminated vesicular rash. Using the Vgf gene as the target for PCR, OPV infection was confirmed in material collected from skin lesions of all children and in blood samples of 4 children. The B9R and d11L genes tested positive in the skin material of 2 children and blood samples of 2 children. All analysed patients presented a history of ineffective antibiotic therapy.

Conclusions
In the case of unclear necrotising skin lesions in children, the primary diagnosis always includes bacterial dermatitis. However, if the patient has come into contact with animals, diagnosis of OPV infection should also be considered.

keywords:

Orthopoxvirus, cowpox, children

Quick links
© 2020 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe