eISSN: 2449-8580
ISSN: 1734-3402
Family Medicine & Primary Care Review
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3/2018
vol. 20
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Who do type 2 diabetics inform about their own illness

Agata Matej-Butrym, Marek Butrym, Ewa Rudnicka-Drożak, Jolanta Szeliga-Król

Fam Med Prim Care Rev 2018; 20(3): 236–240
Online publish date: 2018/09/29
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Background
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can influence the relationship between patients and their social environment. Some diabetics are afraid of discrimination because of their illness.

Objectives
Understanding who of their social circle those afflicted with type 2 diabetes inform of the course of their disease.

Material and methods
136 patients with type 2 diabetes, including 71 women and 65 men (age – median: 62.5, min–max: 40–84) were subjected to a survey study which included, firstly, questions on who they inform about their affliction, secondly, the degree to which they admit to the affliction as compared with selected carbohydrate metabolism parameters of their illness (HbA1c, fasting glucose)

Results
Regarding their affliction, patients with type 2 diabetes most often inform their family members of their state of being, especially those who live with them (99.1%; 111), as well as those who do not live with them (86%; 117), then other people with diabetes (80.1%; 109), friends (72.8%; 99) and neighbours (63.2%; 86). In contrast, every second employed respondent did not inform their employer. The reason for admission to being type 2 diabetic was primarily motivated by a desire to prove that they can live a normal life while diabetic (60.3%; 86). There is a negative correlation between the level of HbA1c and a willingness to reveal that the afflicted can live a normal life despite their diabetes (p < 0,05)

Conclusions
Our research shows that type 2 diabetics do not always inform certain people within their social environment about their illness. This may have negative consequences. The reasons for this behavior require further research.

keywords:

diabetes mellitus type 2 , family, social distance, social environment

 
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