eISSN: 2299-0054
ISSN: 1895-4588
Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques
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1/2021
vol. 16
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Abdominal rebleeding after transcatheter arterial embolization for ruptured pseudoaneurysms associated with severe acute pancreatitis: a retrospective study

Min Ai
1
,
DaZhi Gao
1
,
GuangMing Lu
1
,
Jian Xu
1

1.
Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China
Videosurgery Miniinv 2021; 16 (1): 83–90
Online publish date: 2020/07/21
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Introduction
Patients are at risk of abdominal rebleeding after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for pancreatitis-related pseudoaneurysm, which increases the mortality rate.

Aim
This study was performed to evaluate the effects of an intestinal fistula (IF) and the anatomical location of the pseudoaneurysm on abdominal rebleeding after TAE of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).

Material and methods
From February 2013 to November 2019, 24 patients with SAP-related pseudoaneurysm rupture and hemorrhage in our hospital underwent TAE. All patients’ epidemiological data and related medical histories were collected and statistically analyzed. We classified the pseudoaneurysms as type I, II, and III according to their anatomical locations and as type A (without an IF) and type B (with an IF).

Results
The interventions for abdominal infection in patients with type I pseudoaneurysms were percutaneous drainage in 6 patients, endoscopic necrotic tissue removal in 5, and surgical necrotic tissue removal or enterostomy in none, with a rebleeding rate of 33.3% (3/9 patients). The interventions for abdominal infection in patients with type II pseudoaneurysms were percutaneous drainage in 7 patients, endoscopy in three, and surgery in one, with a rebleeding rate of 20.0% (2/10 patients). The interventions for abdominal infection in patients with type III pseudoaneurysms were percutaneous drainage in 3 patients, endoscopy in 1, and surgery in 2, with a rebleeding rate of 80.0% (4/5 patients). There was no statistically significant difference in the types of interventions for abdominal infection among patients with type I, II, and III pseudoaneurysms (p = 0.355) or in the rate of abdominal rebleeding after TAE for type III pseudoaneurysms (p = 0.111). The interventions for abdominal infection in patients with type A pseudoaneurysms were percutaneous drainage in 13 patients, endoscopy in 6, and surgery in 1, with a rebleeding rate of 22.2% (4/18 patients) and mortality rate of 11.1% (2/18 patients). The interventions for abdominal infection in patients with type B pseudoaneurysms were percutaneous drainage in 3 patients, endoscopy in 3, and surgery in 2, with a rebleeding rate of 83.3% (5/6 patients) and mortality rate of 66.7% (4/6 patients). There was no significant difference in the types of interventions for abdominal infection in patients with and without IF (p = 0.215); however, the rebleeding rate and mortality rate were significantly higher in patients with IF (p = 0.015 and 0.018, respectively).

Conclusions
IF may increase the rate of abdominal rebleeding after TAE for ruptured SAP-related pseudoaneurysms, while the anatomical location of the pseudoaneurysm may not affect the rate of rebleeding after TAE.

keywords:

rebleeding, intestinal fistula, anatomical position, pseudoaneurysm, severe acute pancreatitis

  
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