eISSN: 2084-9893
ISSN: 0033-2526
Dermatology Review/Przegląd Dermatologiczny
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Special Issues Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
3/2019
vol. 106
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original article

Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E and interleukin 33 in atopic dermatitis

Małgorzata Bernacka
1
,
Agata Liszewska
1
,
Ewa Robak
1
,
Anna Woźniacka
1
,
Jarosław Bogaczewicz
1

1.
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland/Klinika Dermatologii i Wenerologii Uniwersytetu Medycznego w Łodzi, Polska
Dermatol Rev/Przegl Dermatol 2019, 106, 257–267
Online publish date: 2019/08/24
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
PlumX metrics:
Introduction
The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis includes genetic predisposition, epidermal barrier dysfunction, immunologic abnormalities and increased immunoglobulin E levels in some of the patients.

Objective
Determination the allergen-specific immunoglobulin E level and serum interleukin-33 concentration in patients with atopic dermatitis.

Material and methods
The study included 62 patients with atopic dermatitis at the mean age of 30.4 ±11.6 years. Clinical eveluation of the SCORAD index and the objective SCORAD (oSCORAD) was performed. Serum samples were analyzed for immunoglobulin E specific allergy using immunoblot kits for 21 allergens of atopy. Serum concentration of interleukin-33 was examined by ELISA.

Results
The SCORAD index was higher (p < 0.05) in atopic dermatitis patients with immunoglobulin E specific to birch, dog fur, horse fur, Cladosporium herbarum, egg white, hazelnut, carrot, and potato than in those without such allergen-specific immunoglobulin E. Objective SCORAD was increased (p < 0.05) in atopic dermatitis patients with immunoglobulin E specific to birch, dog fur, Cladosporium herbarum, egg white, hazelnut, carrot, and potato in comparison to those without such allergen-specific immunoglobulin E. Mean serum concentration of interleukin-33 in patients with atopic dermatitis was 4.9 ±8.12 pg/ml. Serum interleukin-33 level did not correlate with such clinical parameters as the extent of skin lesions, pruritus, sleep disorders, SCORAD index and objective SCORAD. Interleukin-33 level was not higher in atopic dermatitis patients with immunoglobulin E specific to any examined antigen in comparison to those without such immunoglobulin E.

Conclusions
Our study suggests that interleukin-33 is not a reliable marker of activity in atopic dermatitis. Further studies are necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

keywords:

atopic dermatitis, interleukin-33, immunoglobulin E, allergen

Quick links
© 2023 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.