eISSN: 1897-4309
ISSN: 1428-2526
Contemporary Oncology/Współczesna Onkologia
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Supplements Addendum Special Issues Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
1/2012
vol. 16
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Review paper

Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy. Part I. Pathophysiology
[Polish version: Polineuropatia wywołana chemioterapią. Część I. Patofizjologia p. 79]

Krzysztof Brzeziński

Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (1): 72–78
[Polish version: Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (1): 79–85]
Online publish date: 2012/02/29
Article files
- Chemotherapy-induced.pdf  [0.13 MB]
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 
Treatment of patients with neoplastic disease is frequently associated with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), which is a syndrome consisting of highly distressing symptoms of varied degrees of severity. Most commonly, it begins with numbness of distal extremities, and may progress to long-term touch, heat, and cold dysaesthesias and severe motor impairment affecting daily functioning. The disorders described are commonly accompanied by stinging, burning, tingling or electric shock-like neuropathic pain.

Effective anti-tumour therapy improves patients’ survival, thereby increasing the number of patients struggling with problems resulting from the prior treatment. Therefore, the problem of painful peripheral neuropathy may be assumed to persist. It should be borne in mind that other forms of anti-tumour therapy may also cause nervous system damage [1].

Currently, no methods are available that are proven and based on evidence-based medicine for management of these symptoms; it is however optimistic that the number of publications on their pathomechanism, prevention, and treatment is constantly increasing. In the case of most chemotherapeutic agents, CIPN severity depends on the cumulative dose of the drug administered; therefore limiting treatment is the most common method for protecting patients against such symptoms [2-4]. The relevance of such a therapy scheme has been confirmed by model studies [5]. This certainly cannot be the most optimal treatment method, since it involves choosing between its efficacy and toxicity; still, it seems to be the safest option given the current state of knowledge [6].

Chemotherapeutic drugs are particularly active in organs whose cells undergo frequent divisions; therefore, the side effects of cytostatics are mainly manifested in the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and hematopoietic system.

New chemotherapeutic agents display higher selectivity; hence, as might at least be assumed, they should be less toxic to healthy tissues. Unfortunately, the endings of nerve fibres and supporting cells of the peripheral nervous system are paradoxically very sensitive to this type of medication. Agents acting through disruption of the spindle microtubules impair the microtubule-dependent axonal transport as well. Toxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the peripheral nervous system may thus be manifested [7].

The effect exerted by a combination of various chemotherapeutic agents on the incidence and course of CIPN is not known. In most cases, they are administered in multi-drug schemes, while monotherapy is relatively rarely employed. It is probable that their additive or synergistic activity against neoplastic cells may affect the cells of the peripheral nervous system as well [8, 9]. To date, no prospective studies addressing the problem have been conducted. Similarly, there are no clear algorithms for the diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of the syndrome [10, 11].

When CIPN is diagnosed in a patient who was pre-treated with other drugs, it is very difficult to identify the direct cause of the syndrome. Patients are often subjected to different modes of therapy that may delay the symptoms. For instance, dysaesthesia occurs relatively late (even a few months after cisplatin therapy); therefore, it is often ascribed to drug toxicity or regarded as aggravation of symptoms [12], while actually it may be an effect of a previously discontinued treatment.

Examination of nerve conduction and electromyography do not provide precise information about disease occurrence and severity. This is related to the fact that these examinations are focused on the pathology of larger nerve fibres or the neuromuscular junction, while the syndrome described is caused by changes within the thin peripheral bands. Therefore, the accuracy of these studies is insufficient to evaluate chemotherapy-induced changes. Great expectations are attached to examination of evoked potentials, yet even so accurate a diagnosis should be supplemented by peripheral nerve biopsy [13].

Any form of damage to the peripheral nervous system, even if it was diagnosed many years before, is a predisposing factor. Signs of monoclonal gammopathy may often be the first symptoms of neuropathy in the course of other disease entities, e.g. multiple myeloma [14]. The primary cause of the disease does not seem important, as such regularity has been found in both hereditary and inflammatory neuropathy [15-18]. Similarly unimportant is the length of the symptom-free period before chemotherapy [7]. The mechanism described has not been found in patients previously suffering from diabetic polyneuropathy [19] and the available literature does not provide a clear explanation of the absence of increased CIPN incidence in such cases.

Neurotoxicity of particular drug groups

The information about the mechanisms of action of the drugs presents the aspect of induction of damage to the peripheral nervous system, rather than their anti-cancer activity.

Platinum derivatives

The concentration of platinum derivatives in peripheral nerves is comparable to their concentration in the tumour, but significantly lower than that in the brain [20-22]. This is associated with their easy permeation through the capillary network and impeded delivery to the central nervous system [23-25]. Model experiments have revealed a strong affinity of both cisplatin and oxaliplatin to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of spinal ganglion cells [26, 27]. Strong binding of the drug to the DNA structures is an important mechanism of anticancer action, although it is the cause of apoptosis of the nervous system cells [28]. In turn, binding of platinum derivatives to mitochondrial DNA is regarded as a probable cause of neuronal death [29]. According to some authors, this mechanism is frequently recognized in patients with Lhermitte’s sign [7, 30].

In this group of drugs, cisplatin has been used the longest; the frequency of its adverse effects is clearly dependent on the cumulative dose [31-33]. Damage to the peripheral nervous system is usually diagnosed at the cumulative dose of 400-500 mg/m2, i.e. after three to six months of treatment [22, 34, 35]. The clinical symptoms primarily begin with the hand-foot syndrome accompanied by paraesthesias and dysaesthesias. Sensory ataxia may sometimes occur. The question why the side effects sometimes appear only three to six weeks after discontinuation of cytostatic therapy [36] and may progress gradually over many months [37] has not been elucidated yet. Symptoms from the autonomic nervous system are less common and include fatigue, cardiac arrhythmias, and impotence [7, 38].

The frequency and severity of adverse effects of oxaliplatin have been shown to be dependent on the drug dose [39, 40], although the phenomenon is not as severe as in the case of cisplatin. A large proportion of patients (60-80%) feel unpleasant cold-induced paraesthesia especially around the throat, on the whole face or around the mouth, and on the hands. It is described as a burning or pinching sensation caused by contact with a cold surface or cold liquids. It usually appears during the second or third cycle, persists for approximately 30-60 minutes, and has a transient character. About 20-30% of patients suffer from similar symptoms when treated with cisplatin [39, 41, 42]. It was found that this phenomenon was directly related to the cumulative dose [43, 44].

Carboplatin displays significantly lower neurotoxicity [33], although in higher doses it can induce symptoms similar to those produced by cisplatin. A more important fact in the case of the side effects of this drug is that it is frequently used in combination with paclitaxel; neurotoxicity may occur in 20% of patients receiving such treatment [45].

Differential diagnosis is focused mainly on paraneoplastic ganglionopathy [46-48]. Unfortunately, laboratory tests detecting presence of syndrome-specific antibodies, cerebrospinal fluid examination, or nerve biopsy do not ensure conclusive results. It is still necessary to rely on differences in the clinical course. The paraneoplastic syndrome yields asymmetrical signs in the upper extremities and face, whereas CIPN is often symmetrical, more commonly affects the lower extremities, and the facial symptoms are transient.

Neuropathy is a frequent phenomenon (about 30% of patients), while the paraneoplastic syndrome occurs relatively seldom.

When chemotherapy is discontinued due to the onset of peripheral neuropathy, it is possible that the syndrome will further develop. The fact that the active substance in the drug is removed from the body within 96 hours after cessation of drug administration seems irrelevant, as changes in the nervous system have been initiated, and currently there are no methods for protecting the patient against progress of the changes. This phenomenon is called “casting”. Although its existence has been acknowledged, neither its mechanism nor inhibition methods are known [6, 7, 49].

Inhibitors of the spindle apparatus

The mechanism of anti-tumour action of these drugs involves inhibition of formation of mitotic spindle microtubules. This reduces the rate of cell divisions, thereby inhibiting tumour growth. Microtubules fulfil an important role in axonal transport that ensures proper functioning of nerve fibres. Inhibition of this mechanism leads to functional and structural abnormalities of the axon and, consequently, to its death. The damage mechanism specifically affects thin non-myelinated nerve fibres [50]. A correlation has been found between the level of exposure to toxic agents and incidence of nerve ending damage; hence, longer axons exhibit greater susceptibility: the longer the axon, the greater the risk of CIPN occurrence. This explains the typical course of neuropathy that starts in the distal part of the lower extremities and gradually progresses onto the upper parts. Symptoms in the upper extremities appear in the subsequent stage. Neuropathy induced by all drugs of this group has sensory, motor, and autonomous nature. Since the mechanism of its appearance is typically peripheral (without cell damage), functioning of the nervous system can be successfully restored in most cases [7].

Vinca alkaloids exhibit low ability to permeate the blood-brain barrier [51-53]; this restrains the damage to the peripheral parts of the nervous system with no distinct toxicity to the nerve cell [54-56].

Neuropathy induced by this group of drugs is dose-dependent. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy induced by vincristine and vindesine is more severe, whereas vinblastine and vinorelbine are characterized by lower neurotoxicity. A higher risk of neurological damage is associated with administration of vinorelbine in patients pre-treated with paclitaxel [57]. Symptoms usually begin within the first three months after therapy initiation. The first symptoms usually include paraesthesia and pain of the feet and hands accompanied by gradually increasing hyperalgesia. Decreased muscle power, particularly in the wrist and thenar, is a common symptom. There have been reports of cases of mononeuropathy of the lower extremities, cranial nerve damage resulting in diplopia, hearing disorders, and vocal fold palsy [58-61]. The risk of weakened peristalsis accompanied by adynamic ileus is a life-threatening complication [62]. Bladder atony, impotence, orthostatic hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias are relatively common [63, 64]. A rare complication, i.e. progressive motor neuropathy leading to quadriparesis, has also been reported [65]. Serious complications – severe symptoms of neuropathy – have been described in cases where hereditary or inflammatory neuropathy has been diagnosed previously [15, 17, 18], as mentioned at the beginning of the paper.

Besides CIPN, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) as well as infiltration of nerves or nerve roots should also be taken into account in the differential diagnosis.

A characteristic feature of peripheral neuropathy is symmetrical and distal emergence of symptoms accompanied by slow aggravation of symptoms. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy occurs more proximally and is associated with an asymmetrical reduction in muscle power in the area of affected root innervation; symptom development exhibits a higher rate. Nerve root infiltration has to be taken into account in cases where asymmetrical pain is the predominant symptom. In turn, infiltration of peripheral nerves should be suspected in cases of asymmetrical mononeuropathies. Cerebrospinal fluid examinations and diagnostic imaging are useful tools [66].

No algorithms of treatment or prevention of peripheral neuropathy caused by vinca alkaloids have been devised to date. Currently, the only way to mitigate the risk of nerve damage is to reduce the chemotherapy dose, although further development of the syndrome cannot be fully excluded [12]. In mild cases, recovery may be expected within a few months; in more severe cases, it may be substantially prolonged. It should be taken into account that the symptoms may be chronic and persist for years. In the case of neuropathy accompanied by immense pain, methods of neuropathic pain treatment should be employed [67-70].

Like vinca alkaloids, taxanes interfere with mitotic spindle microtubules, but unlike the former, the latter induce excessive stabilization of these structures, thereby preventing normal cell division. Their effect on functioning of the peripheral nervous system is similar to that exerted by vincristine. Excessive stabilization of microtubules required for normal axonal transport results in substantial disturbances and, consequently, considerable damage to their peripheral parts [71]. The clinical effects are not as serious as in the case of the drugs described previously.

Dose-dependent sensory symptoms appear to be less severe than the symptoms induced by the other drugs in this group [72]. These include paraesthesias, sensory disturbances, and foot and hand dysaesthesias. Activities requiring manual precision, such as writing or fastening buttons, may often pose problems. Tendon reflexes and muscle strength may be weakened, although these are rather rare cases. Docetaxel causes a more severe CIPN course than paclitaxel [73]. Since taxanes are often combined with other drugs exhibiting a high potential for damaging the peripheral nervous system, it is difficult to assess which therapy component plays a key role in the pathology development, as there have been no studies addressing this issue.

The differential diagnosis is similar to that used in the case of vinca alkaloids, and the symptoms usually improve within several weeks after discontinuation of treatment. Reduced drug doses together with increased duration of treatment decrease the incidence of complications.

Complications induced by podophyllotoxin derivatives include ataxia, encephalopathy, and myelopathy [74]; however, there is no evidence that therapy with drugs from this group evokes CIPN. Although epothilone neurotoxicity has been reported [75], it may be ascribed to the toxicity of Cremophor used to increase the water solubility of these drugs [76].

Bortezomib was introduced in treatment of multiple myeloma due to its unique mechanism of action through proteasome inhibition. The pathophysiology and treatment of bortezomid- and thalidomide-induced CIPN was described in detail by Bilińska et al. [77].

Alkylating agents

Cyclophosphamide exerts no significant effect on the emergence of CIPN, and the estimated incidence of this syndrome induced by ifosfamide is ca. 8% upon administration of elevated doses only [78]. The slow onset of symptoms is followed by aggravation thereof and emergence of paraesthesias and foot pain. Tendon reflexes are weakened but excessive leg fatigability is rare. After treatment discontinuation, the symptoms disappear slowly (up to several years), but there is never full recovery.

Procarbazine used in chemotherapy of brain tumours and in onco-haematology rarely causes severe neuropathy; yet, cases of myalgia are more common [79]. Intrathecal administration of thiotepa may lead to myelopathy [80] or motor neuropathy [81]. High intravenous doses may induce encephalopathy [82].

Antibiotics

The group of anti-tumour antibiotics consists of many drugs widely used in chemotherapy. Damage to dorsal root ganglion cells induced by doxorubicin has been reported from model experiments [83, 84]; yet, no severe peripheral neuropathy caused by this group of drugs has been described. Cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin is most pronounced, whereas neurotoxicity is observed upon application of the drug in combination with vincristine or thalidomide [7]; therefore, it can be treated as the effect of the other components of the combination therapy.

Antimetabolites

The mechanism of action of this group of drugs involves inhibition of synthesis of certain metabolites required for normal synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and DNA. Neuropathy diagnosed upon application of these drugs often has a central rather than peripheral form. Since only single cases of CIPN have been reported and no research has been conducted on larger material, it can be concluded that this is not a common complication after treatment with antimetabolites.

Intrathecal administration of methotrexate may induce neurotoxicity of this drug, although peripheral neuropathy is rare. In the literature, lumbosacral plexopathy has been reported in both children [85] and adults [86]. It cannot be excluded that it is caused by a malignant process in the central nervous system or concomitant use of other drugs, particularly vincristine [87-91].

Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) in monotherapy and in combination with fludarabine may cause myelopathy or encephalopathy [92]. Peripheral neuropathy is as rare in this case as in application of other drugs of this group [93, 94]. Reports on this issue primarily contain descriptions of cases that cannot be directly compared to clinical practice. Ara-C is still recommended for meningioma treatment and the risk of peripheral neuropathy is considered low.

In 10% of patients, gemcitabine may cause side effects, e.g. subfebrile body temperature, fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, or paraesthesia. No reports of peripheral neuropathy induced by this drug in monotherapy have been found. A case study including such suggestions involved a carboplatin pre-treated patient [95]; therefore, it cannot be excluded that carboplatin was the source of complications. Gemcitabine is often combined with taxanes, platinum derivatives, and vinca alkaloids, i.e. drugs that often induce CIPN. Gemcitabine monotherapy has not been proved to be associated with the risk of peripheral neuropathy [96].

Side effects exerted on the central nervous system by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were reported in 2-5% of patients [97]. Few CIPN cases were diagnosed during combined treatment with levamisole [98, 99] and eniluracil [100].

Capecitabine is metabolized to 5-FU; therefore, CIPN is not commonly diagnosed upon treatment with this therapeutic agent. Single cases of neurological complications have been described, including foot drop and mouth paraesthesia in patients undergoing pancreatic cancer treatment. More frequently, the drug is considered to cause palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, which is associated with local skin redness and swelling reaction appearing several days after initiation of therapy. The drug is excreted by the sweat glands of hands and feet and accumulated under the epidermis, thus causing inflammation. The syndrome is often accompanied by such symptoms as burning and stinging located in the same body parts. However, no permanent damage to the peripheral nervous system was found in this case [101, 102], and the reaction was reversible.

Drugs from different therapeutic groups

Due to its toxicity, suramin is used rather infrequently at present. Damage to the peripheral nervous system involves the cell body, axon and myelin sheath [9, 103]; therefore, suramin-induced CIPN may assume the form of both peripheral and demyelinating neuropathy [104].

Lenalidomide is a thalidomide analogue inducing more severe side effects in the form of somnolescence and neuropathy [105].

Arsenic trioxide, rarely used due to its toxicity, can cause dose- and axonal length-dependent neuropathies, which are partially reversible after discontinuation of the therapy [106]. Tipifarnib is mainly hepatotoxic, while neurotoxicity is not regarded as its major side effect [106, 107].

Summary

The presented material illustrates the complexity of the problems associated with the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The groups of drugs discussed here exhibit different mechanisms of anticancer action; hence damage to the peripheral nervous system proceeds in a variety of ways. Therefore, CIPN cannot be considered a homogeneous syndrome, although the symptoms are substantially similar. Investigations conducted so far have not provided conclusive results concerning prophylaxis and therapy schemes. Currently, the only effective method in the case of the syndrome is reduction of the dose or discontinuation of chemotherapy followed by symptomatic treatment.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Ms Beata Kościańska, MD for her valuable comments during preparation of the manuscript.

References

  1. Ziółkowska E, Zarzycka M, Meller A, Wiśniewski T. Powikłania oczne po radioterapii nowotworów regionu głowy i szyi – przegląd piśmiennictwa. Wspolczesna Onkol 2009; 13: 251-4.   

2. Dougherty PM, Cata JP, Cordella JV, Burton A, Weng HR, et al. Taxol-induced sensory disturbance is characterized by preferential impairment of myelinated fiber function in cancer patients. Pain 2004; 109: 132-42.   

3. Flatters SJ, Bennett GJ. Ethosuximide reverses paclitaxel- and vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. Pain 2004; 109: 150-61.   

4. Flatters SJ, Bennett GJ. Studies of peripheral sensory nerves in paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy: evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Pain 2006; 122: 245-57.   

5. Bennett GJ. Pathophysiology and animal models of cancer-related painful peripheral neuropathy. Oncologist 2010; 15: 9-12.   

6. Kaley TJ, Deangelis LM. Therapy of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Br J Haematol 2009; 145: 3-14.   

7. Windebank AJ, Grisold W. Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. J Peripheral Nerv Syst 2008; 13: 27-46.   

8. Ramirez JJ, Kaufmann SH, Windebank AJ. Paclitaxel potentiates cisplatin neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Neurology 1996; 46: A288.   

9. Sun X, Windebank AJ. Hypoxia potentiates suramin neurotoxicity in rat dorsal root ganglia in vitro. Soc Neurosci 1996; Abstr 22: 948.  

10. Pachman DR, Barton DL, Watson JC, Loprinzi CL. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: prevention and treatment. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2011; 3: 377-87.  

11. Wolf S, Barton D, Kottschade L, Grothey A, Loprinzi C. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: prevention and treatment strategies. Eur J Cancer 2008; 44: 1507-15.  

12. Verstappen CC, Koeppen S, Heimans JJ, Huijgens PC, Scheulen ME, Strumberg D, Kiburg B, Postma TJ. Dose-related vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy with unexpected off-therapy worsening. Neurology 2005; 64: 1076-1077.  

13. Casanova-Molla J, Grau-Junyent JM, Morales M, Valls-Solé J. On the relationship between nociceptive evoked potentials and intraepidermal nerve fiber density in painful sensory polyneuropathies. Pain 2011; 152: 410-8.  

14. Gajos A, Kieliś W, Szadkowska I, Chmielowska E, Niewodniczy A, Bogucki A. Opis przypadku. Nabyte neuropatie obwodowe w przebiegu gammapatii monoklonalnych. Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska 2007; 41: 169-75.

15. Chauvenet AR, Shashi V, Selsky C, Morgan E, Kurtzberg J, Bell B. Vincristine-induced neuropathy as the initial presentation of charcot-marie-tooth disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group study. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2003; 25: 316-20.  

16. Graf WD, Chance PF, Lensch MW, Eng LJ, Lipe HP, Bird TD. Severe vincristine neuropathy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. Cancer 1996; 77: 1356-62.  

17. Bakshi N, Maselli RA, Gospe SM Jr, Ellis WG, McDonald C, Mandler RN. Fulminant demyelinating neuropathy mimicking cerebral death. Muscle Nerve 1997; 20: 1595-7.  

18. Orejana-García AM, Pascual-Huerta J, Pérez-Melero A. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and vincristine. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 2003; 93: 229-33.  

19. Goetz MP, Erlichman C, Windebank AJ, et al. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of two different schedules of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, Fluorouracil, and leucovorin in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol 2003; 21: 3761-9.  

20. Gregg RW, Molepo JM, Monpetit VJ, Mikael NZ, Redmond D, Ga- dia M, Stewart DJ. Cisplatin neurotoxicity: the relationship between dosage, time, and platinum concentration in neurologic tissues, and morphologic evidence of toxicity. J Clin Oncol 1992; 10: 795-803.  

21. Screnci D, McKeage MJ, Galettis P, Hambley TW, Palmer BD, Baguley BC. Relationships between hydrophobicity, reactivity, accumulation and peripheral nerve toxicity of a series of platinum drugs. Br J Cancer 2000; 82: 966-72.  

22. Thompson SW, Davis LE, Kornfeld M, Hilgers RD, Standefer JC. Cisplatin neuropathy. Clinical, electrophysiologic, morphologic, and toxicologic studies. Cancer 1984; 54: 1269-75.  

23. Anzil AP, Blinzinger K, Herrlinger H. Fenestrated blood capillaries in rat cranio-spinal sensory ganglia. Cell Tissue Res 1976; 167: 563-7.  

24. Jacobs JM. Vascular permeability and neurotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect 1978; 26: 107-16.  

25. Olsson Y. Studies on vascular permeability in peripheral nerves. IV. Distribution of intravenously injected protein tracers in the peripheral nervous system of various species. Acta Neuropathol 1971; 17: 114-26.  

26. McDonald ES, Randon KR, Knight A, Windebank AJ. Cisplatin preferentially binds to DNA in dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro and in vivo: a potential mechanism for neurotoxicity. Neurobiol Dis 2005; 18: 305-13.  

27. Ta LE, Espeset L, Podratz J, Windebank AJ. Neurotoxicity of oxaliplatin and cisplatin for dorsal root ganglion neurons correlates with platinum-DNA binding. Neurotoxicology 2006; 27: 992-1002.  

28. Gill JS, Windebank AJ. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons is associated with attempted entry into the cell cycle. J Clin Invest 1998; 101: 2842-50.  

29. Podratz JL, Schlattau AW, Chen BK, Knight AM, Windebank AJ. Platinum adduct formation in mitochondrial DNA may underlie the phenomenon of coasting. J Peripher Nerv Syst 2007; 12: 69.  

30. Eeles R, Tait DM, Peckham MJ. Lhermitte’s sign as a complication of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Cancer Treat Rep 1986; 70: 905-7.  

31. Krarup-Hansen A, Fugleholm K, Helweg-Larsen S, Hauge EN, Schmalbruch H, Trojaborg W, Krarup C. Examination of distal involvement in cisplatin-induced neuropathy in man. An electrophysiological and histological study with particular reference to touch receptor function. Brain 1993; 116: 1017-41.  

32. Fu KK, Kai EF, Leung CK. Cisplatin neuropathy: a prospective clinical and electrophysiological study in Chinese patients with ovarian carcinoma. J Clin Pharm Ther 1995; 20: 167-72.  

33. McKeage MJ. Comparative adverse effect profiles of platinum drugs. Drug Saf 1995; 13: 228-44.  

34. Ozols RF, Ostchega Y, Myers CE, Young RC. High-dose cisplatin in hypertonic saline in refractory ovarian cancer. J Clin Oncol 1985; 3: 246-50.  

35. Walsh TJ, Clark AW, Parhad IM, Green WR. Neurotoxic effects of cisplatin therapy. Arch Neurol 1982; 39: 719-20.  

36. Mollman JE, Hogan WM, Glover DJ, McCluskey LF. Unusual presentation of cis-platinum neuropathy. Neurology 1988; 38: 488-90.  

37. Grunberg SM, Sonka S, Stevenson LL, Muggia FM. Progressive paresthesias after cessation of therapy with very high-dose cisplatin. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1989; 25: 62-4.  

38. Hansen RA, Gartlehner G, Powell GE, Sandler RS. Serious adverse events with infliximab: analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5: 729-35.  

39. Gamelin E, Gamelin L, Bossi L, Quasthoff S. Clinical aspects and molecular basis of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity: current management and development of preventive measures. Semin Oncol 2002; 29: 21-33.  

40. Raymond E, Chaney SG, Taamma A, Cvitkovic E. Oxaliplatin: a review of preclinical and clinical studies. Ann Oncol 1998; 9: 1053-71.  

41. Grothey A. Oxaliplatin-safety profile: neurotoxicity. Semin Oncol 2003; 30: 5-13.  

42. Lehky TJ, Leonard GD, Wilson RH, Grem JL, Floeter MK. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: acute hyperexcitability and chronic neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 2004; 29: 387-92.  

43. Kiernan MC, Krishnan AV. The pathophysiology of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Curr Med Chem 2006; 13: 2901-7.  

44. Leonard GD, Wagner MR, Quinn MG, Grem JL. Severe disabling sensory-motor polyneuropathy during oxaliplatinbased chemotherapy. Anticancer Drugs 2004; 15: 733-5.  

45. International Collaborative Ovarian NeoPlasm Group. Paclitaxel plus carboplatin versus standard chemotherapy with either single-agent carboplatin or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in women with ovarian cancer: the ICON3 randomised trial. Lancet 2002; 360: 505-15.  

46. Voltz RD, Posner JB, Dalmau J, Graus F. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis: an update of the effects of the anti-Hu immune response on the nervous system and tumour. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997; 63: 133-6.  

47. Graus F, Keime-Guibert F, Ren~é R, Benyahia B, Ribalta T, Ascaso C, Escaramis G, Delattre JY. Anti-Hu-associated paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis: analysis of 200 patients. Brain 2001; 124: 1138-48.  

48. Bryl M, Ramlau R, Dyszkiewicz W. Postępowanie w zaawansowanych inwazyjnych grasiczakach – przegląd piśmiennictwa. Wspolczesna Onkol 2004; 8: 148-52.  

49. Albers J, Chaudhry V, Cavaletti G, Donehower R. Interventions for preventing neuropathy caused by cisplatin and related compounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007; CD005228.  

50. Paulson JC, McClure WO. Inhibition of axoplasmic transport by colchicine, podophyllotoxin, and vinblastine: an effect on microtubules. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1975; 253: 517-27.  

51. Jackson DV Jr, Castle MC, Poplack DG, Bender RA. Pharmacokinetics of vincristine in the cerebrospinal fluid of subhuman primates. Cancer Res 1980; 40: 722-4.  

52. Greig NH, Soncrant TT, Shetty HU, Momma S, Smith QR, Rapo- port SI. Brain uptake and anticancer activities of vincristine and vinblastine are restricted by their low cerebrovascular permeability and binding to plasma constituents in rat. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1990; 26: 263-8.  

53. Schaumburg H. Vinca Alkaloids. In: Experimental and Clinical Neurotoxicology. 2nd ed. Schaumburg H, Spencer P (eds.). Oxford University Press, New York 2000; 1232-5.  

54. Pan YA, Misgeld T, Lichtman JW, Sanes JR. Effects of neurotoxic and neuroprotective agents on peripheral nerve regeneration assayed by time-lapse imaging in vivo. J Neurosci 2003; 23: 11479-88.  

55. Sahenk Z, Brady ST, Mendell JR. Studies on the pathogenesis of vincristine-induced neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 1987; 10: 80-4.  

56. Iqbal Z, Ochs S. Uptake of Vinca alkaloids into mammalian nerve and its subcellular components. J Neurochem 1980; 34: 59-68.

57. Fazeny B, Zifko U, Meryn S, Huber H, Grisold W, Dittrich C. Vinorelbine-induced neurotoxicity in patients with advanced breast cancer pretreated with paclitaxel – a phase II study. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1996; 39: 150-6.  

58. Burns BV, Shotton JC. Vocal fold palsy following vinca alkaloid treatment. J Laryngol Otol 1998; 112: 485-7.  

59. Sanderson PA, Kuwabara T, Cogan DG. Optic neuropathy presumably caused by vincristine therapy. Am J Ophthalmol 1976; 81: 146-50.  

60. Lugassy G, Shapira A. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with vincristine treatment. Blut 1990; 61: 320-1.  

61. Kalcioglu MT, Kuku I, Kaya E, Oncel S, Aydogdu I. Bilateral hearing loss during vincristine therapy: a case report. J Chemother 2003; 15: 290-2.  

62. Low PA, Vernino S, Suarez G. Autonomic dysfunction in peripheral nerve disease. Muscle Nerve 2003; 27: 646-61.  

63. Hohneker JA. A summary of vinorelbine (Navelbine) safety data from North American clinical trials. Semin Oncol 1994; 21: 42-7.  

64. Curran MP, Plosker GL. Vinorelbine: a review of its use in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Drugs Aging 2002; 19: 695-721.

65. Moudgil SS, Riggs JE. Fulminant peripheral neuropathy with severe quadriparesis associated with vincristine therapy. Ann Pharmacother 2000; 34: 1136-8.  

66. Glantz MJ, Cole BF, Glantz LK, Cobb J, Mills P, Lekos A, Walters BC, Recht LD. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology in patients with cancer: minimizing false-negative results. Cancer 1998; 82: 733-9.  

67. Dworkin RH, O'Connor AB, Backonja M, et al. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: evidence-based recommendations. Pain 2007; 132: 237-51.  

68. Finnerup NB, Sindrup SH, Jensen TS. The evidence for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain 2010; 150: 573-81.  

69. Dworkin RH, O'Connor AB, Audette J, et al. Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain: an overview and literature update. Mayo Clin Proc 2010; 85 (3 Suppl): S3-14.  

70. Dzierżanowski T, Ciałkowska-Rysz A. Neuropathic pain in palliative care patients. Medycyna Paliatywna 2010; 2: 57-66.  

71. Apfel S. Taxoids. In: Experimental and Clinical Neurotoxicology. 2nd ed. Schaumburg H, Spencer P (eds.). Oxford University Press, New York 2000; 1135-9.  

72. Postma TJ, Vermorken JB, Liefting AJ, Pinedo HM, Heimans JJ. Paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Ann Oncol 1995; 6: 489-94.  

73. Hilkens PH, Verweij J, Vecht CJ, Stoter G, van den Bent MJ. Clinical characteristics of severe peripheral neuropaty induced by docetaxel (Taxotere). Ann Oncol 1997; 8: 187-90.  

74. Boillot A, Cordier A, Guerault E, Julliot MC, Balvay P, Billerey C, Barale F (1989): A rare case of severe toxic peripheral neuropathy: poisoning by podophyllin. Apropos of 1 case. J Toxicol Clin Exp 1989; 9: 409-12.  

75. Rogalska A, Marczak A, Szwed M, Gajek A, Jóźwiak Z. Epotilony – nadzieja dla pacjentów niewrażliwych na leczenie taksanami. Wspolczesna Onkol 2010; 14: 205-10.  

76. Brat DJ, Windebank AJ, Brimijoin S. Emulsifier for intravenous cyclosporin inhibits neurite outgrowth, causes deficits in rapid axonal transport and leads to structural abnormalities in differentiating N1E.115 neuroblastoma. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1992; 261: 803-10.  

77. Bilińska M, Usnarska-Zubkiewicz L, Dmoszyńska A. Polineuropatia wywołana talidomidem i bortezomibem u chorych na szpiczaka mnogiego, możliwości leczenia bólu neuropatycznego. Zalecenia Polskiej Grupy Szpiczakowej. Wspolczesna Onkol 2008; 12: 441-6.  

78. Patel SR, Vadhan-Raj S, Papadopolous N, Plager C, Burgess MA, Hays C, Benjamin RS. High-dose ifosfamide in bone and soft tissue sarcomas: results of phase II and pilot studies – dose-response and schedule dependence. J Clin Oncol 1997; 15: 2378-84.  

79. Spivack SD. Drugs 5 years later: procarbazine. Ann Intern Med 1974; 81: 795-800.  

80. Gutin PH, Levi JA, Wiernik PH, Walker MD. Treatment of malignant meningeal disease with intrathecal thioTEPA: a phase II study. Cancer Treat Rep 1977; 61: 885-7.  

81. Martín Algarra S, Henriquez I, Rebollo J, Artieda J. Severe polyneuropathy and motor loss after intrathecal thiotepa combination chemotherapy: description of two cases. Anticancer Drugs 1990; 1: 33-5.  

82. Cairncross G, Swinnen L, Bayer R, et al. Myeloablative chemotherapy for recurrent aggressive oligodendroglioma. Neuro Oncol 2000; 2: 114-9.  

83. Cho ES. Toxic effects of adriamycin on the ganglia of the peripherial nervous system: a neuropathological study. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1977; 36: 907-15.  

84. Bigotte L, Olsson Y. Retrograde transport of doxorubicin (adriamycin) in peripheral nerves of mice. Neurosci Lett 1982; 32: 217-21.  

85. Koh S, Nelson MD Jr, Kovanlikaya A, Chen LS. Anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy after intrathecal methotrexate treatment. Pediatr Neurol 1999; 21: 576-8.  

86. Moore BE, Somers NP, Smith TW. Methotrexate-related nonnecrotizing multifocal axonopathy detected by beta-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2002; 126: 79-81.  

87. Boogerd W, Moffie D, Smets LA. Early blindness and coma during intrathecal chemotherapy for meningeal carcinomatosis. Cancer 1990; 65: 452-7.  

88. Harila-Saari AH, Huuskonen UE, Tolonen U, Vainionpää LK, Lanning BM. Motor nervous pathway function is impaired after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a study with moor evoked potentials. Med Pediatr Oncol 2001; 36: 345-51.  

89. Ionasescu VV. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies: from clinical description to molecular genetics. Muscle Nerve 1995; 18: 267-75.  

90. Shibutani M, Okeda R, Hori A, Schipper H. Methotrexate-related multifocal axonopathy. Report of an autopsy case. Acta Neuropathol 1989; 79: 333-5.  

91. Weiss S, Kahn Y. Intrathecal methotrexate causing paraplegia in a middle-aged woman. Acta Haematol 1978; 60: 59-61.  

92. Kornblau SM, Cortes-Franco J, Estey E. Neurotoxicity associated with fludarabine and cytosine arabinoside chemotherapy for acute leukemia and myelodysplasia. Leukemia 1993; 7: 378-83.  

93. Russell JA, Powles RL. Letter: neuropathy due to cytosine arabinoside. Br Med J 1974; 4: 652-3.  

94. Cheson BD, Vena DA, Foss FM, Sorensen JM. Neurotoxicity of purine analogs: a review. J Clin Oncol 1994; 12: 2216-28.  

95. Dormann AJ, Grünewald T, Wigginghaus B, Huchzermeyer H. Gemcitabine-associated autonomic neuropathy. Lancet 1998; 351: 644.  

96. Colomer R, Llombart-Cussac A, Lluch A, et al. Biweekly paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer: phase II trial and predictive value of HER2 extracellular domain. Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 201-6.  

97. Allegra CJ, Grem JL. Antimetabolites. In: Cancer Principles and Practice in Oncology. 5th ed. De Vita V, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.). Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia 1997; 432-52.  

98. Moertel CG, Fleming TR, Macdonald JS, et al. Levamisole and fluorouracil for adjuvant therapy of resected colon carcinoma. N Engl J Med 1990; 322: 352-8.  

99. Stein ME, Drumea K, Yarnitsky D, Benny A, Tzuk-Shina T. A rare event of 5-fluorouracil-associated peripheral neuropathy: a report of two patients. Am J Clin Oncol 1998; 21: 248-9.

100. Saif MW, Wilson RH, Harold N, Keith B, Dougherty DS, Grem JL. Peripheral neuropathy associated with weekly oral 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and eniluracil. Anticancer Drugs 2001; 12: 525-31.

101. Hamilton S. Hand-foot syndrome. 2005; http://www.chemocare.com/managing/handfoot_syndrome.asp

102. Nagore E, Insa A, Sanmartín O. Antineoplastic therapyinduced palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia (“hand-foot”) syndrome. Incidence, recognition and management. Am J Clin Dermatol 2000; 1: 225-34.

103. Russell JW, Gill JS, Sorenson EJ, Schultz DA, Windebank AJ. Suramin-induced neuropathy in an animal model. J Neurol Sci 2001; 192: 71-80.

104. Chaudhry V, Eisenberger MA, Sinibaldi VJ, Sheikh K, Griffin JW, Cornblath DR. A prospective study of suramin-induced peripheral neuropathy. Brain 1996; 119: 2039-52.

105. Hussein MA. Lenalidomide: patient management strategies. Semin Hematol 2005; 42: 22-5.

106. Hansen RA, Gartlehner G, Powell GE, Sandler RS. Serious adverse events with infliximab: analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5: 729-35.

107. Robertson MJ, Kahl BS, Vose JM, et al. Phase II study of enzastaurin, a protein kinase C beta inhibitor, in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2007; 25: 1741-6.

Address for correspondence

Krzysztof Brzeziński

Poradnia Leczenia Bólu

Instytut Medycyny Wsi w Lublinie

ul. Jaczewskiego 2

20-090 Lublin

tel. 605 228 412

e-mail: k.brzezinski@op.pl



Submitted : 14.01.2012

Accepted : 15.02.2012
Leki stosowane w chemioterapii mają różne mechanizmy działania zarówno na tkankę nowotworową, jak i na obwodowy układ nerwowy, dlatego nie można traktować obwodowej neuropatii wywołanej chemioterapią (chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy – CIPN) jak jednorodnej jednostki chorobowej. Artykuł jest próbą usystematyzowania wiedzy na temat działania toksycznego chemioterapii na obwodowy układ nerwowy.

Leczenie pacjentów w przebiegu chorób nowotworowych często wiąże się z występowaniem CIPN. Jest to zespół niezwykle uciążliwych objawów przybierający różne stopnie nasilenia. Najczęściej rozpoczyna się od drętwienia dystalnych części kończyn, którego nasilenie powoduje długotrwałe zaburzenia czucia dotyku, ciepła i zimna, aż do poważnych zaburzeń motorycznych utrudniających codzienne funkcjonowanie. Opisywanym dolegliwościom często towarzyszą objawy bólu neuropatycznego w postaci pieczenia, palenia, strzelania czy uczucia rażenia prądem.

Skuteczność terapii przeciwnowotworowych zwiększa przeżywalność chorych, a co za tym idzie – liczbę pacjentów borykających się z dolegliwościami będącymi skutkiem wcześniejszego leczenia. Z tego względu można przypuszczać, że problem bolesnej neuropatii obwodowej będzie narastał. Należy także pamiętać, że inne formy leczenia przeciwnowotworowego również mogą być przyczyną uszkodzenia układu nerwowego [1].

Nie dysponujemy obecnie sprawdzonymi i opartymi na evidence based medicine metodami postępowania w razie wystąpienia tych dolegliwości, ale optymizmem napawa fakt, że liczba publikacji dotyczących patomechanizmu, profilaktyki i leczenia ciągle rośnie. W przypadku większości chemioterapeutyków nasilenie CIPN zależy od dawki sumarycznej preparatu, dlatego najczęściej stosowanym sposobem zabezpieczenia chorych przed tego typu dolegliwościami jest ograniczenie leczenia [2–4]. Zasadność takiego działania potwierdzają również badania modelowe [5]. Z pewnością nie jest to najlepsza metoda postępowania, zakłada bowiem balansowanie między skutecznością i toksycznością leczenia, ale przy obecnym stanie wiedzy wydaje się nadal najbezpieczniejszym rozwiązaniem [6].

Leki stosowane w chemioterapii szczególnie silnie działają na te grupy narządów, których komórki ulegają częstym podziałom, dlatego działania uboczne cytostatyków manifestują się głównie w obrębie przewodu pokarmowego, skóry i układu krwiotwórczego.

Nowe chemioterapeutyki działają bardziej selektywnie, dzięki czemu (przynajmniej w założeniu) powinny nieść ze sobą mniejszą toksyczność dla zdrowych tkanek. Niestety, paradoksalnie zakończenia włókien nerwowych i komórki pomocnicze obwodowego układu nerwowego są na tego typu leki bardzo wrażliwe. Środki działające przez rozerwanie mikrotubuli wrzeciona podziałowego wpływają również na zależny od mikrotubuli transport aksonalny. W ten sposób może się objawiać toksyczne działanie chemioterapeutyków na obwodowy układ nerwowy [7].

Nie wiadomo również, w jaki sposób połączenie różnych chemioterapeutyków wpływa na częstość występowania i przebieg CIPN. W większości przypadków stosuje się je w schematach wielolekowych – monoterapia należy raczej do rzadkości. Niewykluczone, że działanie addycyjne lub synergistyczne wobec komórek nowotworowych może się objawiać również wobec komórek obwodowego układu nerwowego [8, 9]. Dotąd nie ma badań prospektywnych opisujących ten problem, brakuje także jasnych algorytmów postępowania podczas diagnozy, profilaktyki i leczenia tego zespołu [10, 11].

W przypadku stwierdzenia CIPN u pacjenta, który był uprzednio leczony innymi lekami, bardzo trudno jest ocenić, co było bezpośrednią przyczyną wystąpienia tego zespołu. Chorzy bardzo często są poddawani terapii różnymi środkami, przy których objawy chorobowe mogą występować z opóźnieniem. Na przykład dolegliwości o charakterze dyzestezji pojawiają się stosunkowo późno (nawet kilka miesięcy po zakończeniu terapii cisplatyną), więc często są uznawane za objaw toksyczności zastosowanych leków lub pogorszenie dolegliwości [12], podczas gdy mogą być konsekwencją dawno już zakończonego leczenia.

Badanie przewodnictwa nerwowego lub elektromiografia nie dostarczają dokładnych informacji co do obecności i nasilenia schorzenia. Przyczyną jest fakt, że badania te ogniskują się na patologii większych włókien nerwowych lub złącza nerwowo-mięśniowego, a opisywany zespół objawów ma swą przyczynę w zmianach chorobowych występujących w obrębie cienkich włókien obwodowych. Z tego względu dokładność tych badań jest niewystarczająca, aby oceniać zmiany wywołane chemioterapią. Duże nadzieje wiązane są z badaniem potencjałów wywołanych, ale nawet tak dokładna diagnostyka powinna być uzupełniona biopsją nerwów obwodowych [13].

Czynnikiem predestynującym jest uprzednio stwierdzona jakakolwiek postać uszkodzenia obwodowego układu nerwowego. Prawidłowość ta występuje nawet wtedy, gdy do uszkodzenia obwodowego układu nerwowego doszło przed wielu laty. Niejednokrotnie objawy gammapatii monoklonalnych mogą być pierwszymi objawami neuropatii w przebiegu innych jednostek chorobowych, np. szpiczaka mnogiego [14]. Nie jest przy tym ważne, jaka była pierwotna przyczyna choroby, ponieważ taką prawidłowość stwierdzono zarówno w przypadku neuropatii dziedzicznej, jak i zapalnej [15–18]. Nie ma znaczenia także okres bez dolegliwości przed podjęciem chemioterapii. Opisany mechanizm nie występuje natomiast u pacjentów cierpiących uprzednio na polineuropatię cukrzycową [19], w dostępnej literaturze nie znaleziono jasnego wytłumaczenia, dlaczego w tych przypadkach nie stwierdza się częstszego występowania CIPN.

Neurotoksyczność wybranych grup leków

Informacje na temat mechanizmów działania wymienionych leków przedstawiono jedynie w aspekcie wywoływania uszkodzenia obwodowego układu nerwowego, nie zaś działania przeciwnowotworowego.

Pochodne platyny

Stężenie pochodnych platyny w nerwach obwodowych jest porównywalne do stężenia w guzie, za to znacznie mniejsze niż w mózgu [20–22]. Jest to związane z łatwym przechodzeniem przez siatkę naczyń włosowatych i jednocześnie utrudnionym transportem do ośrodkowego układu nerwowego [23–25]. W doświadczeniach modelowych stwierdzono silne powinowactwo zarówno cisplatyny, jak i oksaliplatyny do kwasu dezoksyrybonukleinowego (DNA) komórek zwoju rdzeniowego [26, 27]. Silne łączenie się leku ze strukturami DNA jest ważnym mechanizmem działania przeciwnowotworowego, ale staje się również przyczyną apoptozy komórek układu nerwowego [28]. Z kolei wiązanie pochodnych platyny z mitochondrialnym DNA uważa się za prawdopodobną przyczynę obumierania neuronów [29]. Według niektórych autorów mechanizm ten jest dość często spotykany u pacjentów z objawem Lermitta [30].

Z tej grupy leków najdłużej używana jest cisplatyna, w której przypadku występowanie działań niepożądanych wyraźnie zależy od kumulacyjnej dawki [31–33]. Uszkodzenie obwodowego układu nerwowego objawia się najczęściej po osiągnięciu sumarycznej dawki 400–500 mg/m2, a więc po 3–6 miesiącach leczenia [34, 35]. Najczęściej objawy kliniczne rozpoczynają się od zaburzeń czucia w obrębie dłoni i stóp, którym towarzyszą parestezje i dyzestezje. Niejednokrotnie może nawet dochodzić do ataksji czuciowej. Nie zbadano dotąd, dlaczego objawy niepożądane występują czasami dopiero 3–6 tygodniach po odstawieniu cytostatyków [36] i mogą się zwiększać sukcesywnie przez wiele miesięcy [37]. Objawy ze strony układu autonomicznego występują rzadziej, zwykle w postaci uczucia zmęczenia, zaburzeń rytmu serca lub impotencji [38].

Częstość występowania i nasilenie objawów niepożądanych po oksaliplatynie wykazują również zależność od dawki leku [39, 40], chociaż zjawisko to nie jest tak nasilone jak w wypadku cisplatyny. Duża część chorych (60–80%) odczuwa nieprzyjemne parestezje wywołane zimnem, szczególnie w okolicach gardła, całej twarzy lub jedynie ust, a także w obrębie dłoni. Opisywane są jako pieczenie lub szczypanie wywoływane kontaktem z zimną powierzchnią lub zimnymi płynami. Uczucie to pojawia się najczęściej podczas drugiego lub trzeciego cyklu, trwa ok. 30–60 minut i ma charakter przemijający. Około 20–30% pacjentów doświadcza objawów podobnych do opisanych również w przypadku leczenia cisplatyną [41, 42]. Stwierdzono, że zjawisko to jest bezpośrednio związane z kumulacją dawki [43, 44].

Znacznie mniejszą neurotoksyczność wykazuje karboplatyna, jednak w większych dawkach może wywoływać podobne objawy jak cisplatyna. Większe znaczenie w przypadku objawów niepożądanych tego leku ma fakt częstego stosowania go w połączeniu z paklitakselem, ponieważ u 20% pacjentów leczonych wg tego schematu może wystąpić neurotoksyczność [45].

Diagnostyka różnicowa dotyczy przede wszystkim gangliopatii w przebiegu zespołu paraneoplastycznego [46–48]. Niestety, badania laboratoryjne polegające na poszukiwaniu przeciwciał charakterystycznych dla tego zespołu, badania płynu mózgowo-rdzeniowego czy biopsja nerwów nie dają wyników rozstrzygających. Nadal konieczne jest oparcie się na różnicach przebiegu klinicznego. Zespół paraneoplastyczny daje objawy niesymetryczne, dotyczące częściej kończyn górnych i okolicy twarzy, CIPN występuje symetrycznie i dotyczy częściej kończyn dolnych, a objawy w okolicy twarzy mają charakter przemijający. Neuropatia jest zjawiskiem częstym (dotyczy ok. 30% pacjentów), natomiast zespół paranowotworowy występuje dość rzadko.

W przypadku przerwania chemioterapii z powodu wystąpienia objawów rozpoczynającej się neuropatii obwodowej należy się liczyć z możliwością dalszego rozwoju tego zespołu. Nie jest istotne, że substancja czynna zawarta w leku zostaje usunięta z organizmu w ciągu 96 godz. od czasu zaprzestania podawania leku. Zmiany w obrębie układu nerwowego zostały zapoczątkowane i dotąd nie ma sposobu, aby zabezpieczyć pacjenta przed ich rozwojem. Zjawisko to nazywane jest casting. Mimo świadomości jego występowania, nadal ani mechanizm powstawania, ani sposoby zahamowania go nie są znane [49].

Inhibitory wrzeciona podziałowego

Mechanizm działania przeciwnowotworowego tych leków polega na hamowaniu tworzenia mikrotubuli koniecznych do formowania wrzeciona mitotycznego. Dzięki temu zmniejsza się szybkość podziałów komórkowych, co prowadzi w konsekwencji do zahamowania rozrostu guza. Mikrotubule odgrywają również ważną rolę w transporcie aksonalnym, zapewniającym właściwe funkcjonowanie włókna nerwowego. Zahamowanie tego mechanizmu doprowadza do zaburzeń funkcjonalnych i strukturalnych aksonu i w ich następstwie do jego śmierci. Opisany mechanizm uszkodzenia dotyczy szczególnie cienkich bezmielinowych włókien nerwowych [50]. Występuje zależność między wielkością ekspozycji na czynniki toksyczne i częstością uszkodzenia zakończeń nerwowych, dlatego aksony o większej długości wykazują większą wrażliwość. Im dłuższy jest akson, tym większe niebezpieczeństwo występowania CIPN. W ten sposób tłumaczy się typowy przebieg neuropatii, która rozpoczyna się od dystalnych części kończyn dolnych, obejmując sukcesywnie coraz wyższe partie. Dolegliwości pojawiają się w obrębie kończyn górnych dopiero w następnym etapie. Neuropatia wywołana przez wszystkie leki z tej grupy ma charakter sensoryczny, motoryczny i autonomiczny. Ze względu na typowo obwodowy mechanizm powstawania (bez uszkodzenia komórki) w większości przypadków udaje się przywrócić prawidłowe funkcjonowanie układu nerwowego.

Alkaloidy barwinka z trudnością przenikają przez barierę krew–mózg [51–53], co powoduje ograniczenie uszkodzenia do obwodowych części układu nerwowego, bez zaznaczonej toksyczności wobec komórki nerwowej [54–56].

Neuropatia w przypadku tej grupy leków jest zależna od dawki. Cięższy przebieg mają CIPN po winkrystynie i windezinie, natomiast winblastyna i winorelbina charakteryzują się mniejszą neurotoksycznością. Większe niebezpieczeństwo wystąpienia objawów uszkodzenia układu nerwowego wiąże się z podawaniem winorelbiny u pacjentów leczonych uprzednio za pomocą paklitakselu [57]. Objawy pojawiają się najczęściej w ciągu 3 pierwszych miesięcy od rozpoczęcia leczenia. Początek dolegliwości przeważnie jest związany z występowaniem parestezji i bólu w obrębie stóp i dłoni, którym towarzyszy stopniowo nasilająca się hiperalgezja. Osłabienie siły mięśniowej stanowi również częsty objaw, szczególnie w obrębie nadgarstka i kłębu kciuka. Opisywane są także przypadki mononeuropatii kończyny dolnej, uszkodzenie nerwów czaszkowych w postaci diplopii zaburzeń słuchu i porażenia strun głosowych [58–61]. Groźnym dla życia powikłaniem jest zagrożenie osłabienia perystaltyki jelit z możliwością wystąpienia niedrożności porażennej [62]. Stosunkowo często występują: atonia pęcherza moczowego, impotencja, hipotensja ortostatyczna i zaburzenia rytmu serca [63, 64]. Opisano również rzadkie powikłanie w postaci postępującej neuropatii motorycznej, która doprowadziła do porażenia czterokończynowego [65]. Ciężkie powikłania w postaci nasilonych objawów neuropatii opisywane są w przypadkach, gdy uprzednio stwierdzono występowanie neuropatii dziedzicznych lub zapalnych, co zaznaczono na wstępie.

W diagnostyce różnicowej pod uwagę należy brać oprócz CIPN także ostrą formę zapalnej radikulopatii demielinizacyjnej (acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy – AIDP), jak również nacieczenia nerwów lub korzeni nerwowych.

Charakterystyczne dla neuropatii obwodowej jest symetryczne i dystalne pojawianie się objawów z powolnym narastaniem dolegliwości. Ostra zapalna radikulopatia demielinizacyjna występuje raczej proksymalnie i wiąże się z niesymetrycznym zmniejszeniem siły mięśni w zakresie obszaru unerwienia zajętych korzeni, a nasilenie objawów ma szybszy przebieg. W przypadkach, gdy objawem dominującym jest ból pojawiający się niesymetrycznie, należy brać pod uwagę możliwość nacieku korzeni nerwowych. Z kolei nacieczenie nerwów obwodowych należy podejrzewać w przypadkach wystąpienia niesymetrycznych mononeuropatii. Pomocne są badania płynu mózgowo-rdzeniowego i diagnostyka obrazowa [66].

Nie stworzono algorytmów leczenia ani profilaktyki neuropatii obwodowej wywołanej przez alkaloidy barwinka. Nadal jedynym sposobem zmniejszenia niebezpieczeństwa rozwoju uszkodzenia nerwów jest zmniejszenie dawki chemioterapeutyku, jednak nigdy nie ma pewności, że zespół chorobowy nie będzie się rozwijał nadal. W przypadkach o łagodnym przebiegu można oczekiwać powrotu do zdrowia w ciągu kilku miesięcy, a w cięższych przypadkach może się on znacznie wydłużać. Należy się liczyć z tym, że dolegliwości mogą mieć charakter przewlekły i nie ustępować przez długie lata. Jeżeli wystąpiła neuropatia z dużymi dolegliwościami bólowymi, należy stosować sposoby leczenia wskazane w przypadkach bólu neuropatycznego [67–70].

Taksany, podobnie jak alkaloidy barwinka, działają przez mikrotubule wrzeciona mitotycznego, ale w przeciwieństwie do nich powodują nadmierną stabilizację tych struktur, uniemożliwiając w ten sposób prawidłowy podział komórki. Wpływ taksanów na funkcjonowanie obwodowego układu nerwowego jest podobny jak winkrystyny. Nadmierna stabilizacja mikrotubul koniecznych do właściwego transportu aksonalnego powoduje jego znaczne zaburzenie i w konsekwencji uszkodzenie obwodowych części [71]. Efekty kliniczne nie są jednak tak poważne jak w przypadku leków opisanych wcześniej.

Objawy sensoryczne, zależne od dawki, pojawiają się w znacznie mniejszym stopniu niż w przypadku innych leków z tej grupy [72]. Należą do nich parestezje, zaburzenia czucia i dyzestezje w obrębie stóp i dłoni. Często występują problemy z wykonywaniem czynności wymagających precyzji, takich jak pisanie czy zapięcie guzika. Odruchy ścięgniste i siła mięśniowa mogą być osłabione, ale są to raczej rzadkie przypadki. Docetaksel powoduje cięższy przebieg CIPN niż paklitaksel [73]. Ponieważ taksany są często stosowane razem z innymi lekami o dużym potencjale wywoływania uszkodzenia obwodowego układu nerwowego, trudno jest ocenić, która ze składowych terapii odgrywa wiodącą rolę w powstawaniu patologii, tym bardziej że nie ma badań opisujących ten problem.

Diagnostyka różnicowa jest podobna do stosowanej w przypadku alkaloidów barwinka, a dolegliwości zmniejszają się przeważnie po kilku tygodniach od ukończenia leczenia. Redukcja dawki leków z jednoczesnym wydłużeniem czasu leczenia w wielu przypadkach zmniejsza częstość występowania powikłań.

W przypadku pochodnych podofilotoksyny opisywanymi powikłaniami są ataksja, encefalopatia i mielopatia [74], ale nie stwierdzono, aby terapia lekami z tej grupy była przyczyną CIPN. Opisano wprawdzie neurotoksyczność epotilonów [75], ale nie można wykluczyć, że może być ona spowodowana toksycznym działaniem kremoforu, używanego w celu zwiększenia rozpuszczalności tych leków w wodzie [76].

Bortezomib został wprowadzony do leczenia szpiczaka mnogiego ze względu na unikalny mechanizm działania przez inhibicję proteasomu. Patofizjologia i postępowanie w CIPN po bortezomibie i talidomidzie zostały szczegółowo opisane przez Bilińską i wsp. [77].

Leki alkilujące

Cyklofosfamid nie ma istotnego wpływu na częstość występowania CIPN, natomiast w przypadku ifosfamidu częstość występowania tego zespołu ocenia się na ok. 8% i to jedynie po stosowaniu większych dawek [78]. Początkowo rozwój dolegliwości jest powolny, po czym nasilają się objawy w postaci parestezji i bólu w obrębie stóp. Odruchy ścięgniste są osłabione, ale nadmierna męczliwość nóg występuje rzadko. Po odstawieniu leku objawy ustępują powoli (do kilku lat), a powrót do zdrowia nigdy nie jest całkowity.

Prokarbazyna stosowana w chemioterapii guzów mózgu i w przypadkach onkohematologicznych raczej rzadko wywołuje poważne neuropatie, częstsze są natomiast przypadki bólów mięśniowych [79].

Tiotepa po podawaniu dokanałowym może być przyczyną mielopatii [80] lub neuropatii motorycznej [81]. Wysokie dawki dożylne mogą zaś wywołać encefalopatię [82].

Antybiotyki

Antybiotyki przeciwnowotworowe to grupa składająca się z wielu leków, szeroko stosowanych w chemioterapii. Wprawdzie opisywano uszkodzenia komórek zwoju korzenia tylnego podczas stosowania doksorubicyny w doświadczeniach modelowych [83, 84], jednak nie opisano znacznego stopnia neuropatii obwodowych po podawaniu leków z tej grupy. Na pierwszy plan wysuwa się kardiotoksyczność doksorubicyny, a neurotoksyczność stwierdzana jest podczas jej stosowania łącznie z winkrystyną lub talidomidem, więc traktować ją można jako efekt innych składowych terapii złożonej.

Antymetabolity

Mechanizm działania leków z tej grupy polega na hamowaniu syntezy niektórych metabolitów koniecznych do prawidłowej syntezy kwasu rybonukleinowego (RNA) i DNA. Neuropatia stwierdzana w wypadku tej grupy leków ma częściej postać ośrodkową niż obwodową. Ponieważ opisywane są jedynie pojedyncze przypadki CIPN i nie znaleziono badań prowadzonych na większym materiale, można uznać, że nie jest to częste powikłanie po terapii antymetabolitami.

W przypadku podawania metotreksatu dokanałowo może się zaznaczyć neurotoksyczność tego leku, lecz neuropatia obwodowa należy do rzadkości. W piśmiennictwie można znaleźć opisy pleksopatii w odcinku lędźwiowym zarówno u dzieci [85], jak i dorosłych [86]. Nie można jednak wykluczyć, że przyczyną było zajęcie ośrodkowego układu nerwowego przez proces nowotworowy lub jednoczesne stosowanie innych leków, a szczególnie winkrystyny [87–91].

Arabinozyd cytozyny (Ara-C) w monoterapii, jak również w połączeniu z fludarabiną, może wywoływać mielopatię lub encefalopatię [92]. Neuropatia obwodowa w tym przypadku, podobnie jak podczas stosowania innych leków z tej grupy, należy do rzadkości [93, 94]. Doniesienia na ten temat zawierają głównie opisy przypadków, których nie można odnosić bezpośrednio do praktyki klinicznej. Arabinozyd cytozyny jest nadal rekomendowany do leczenia oponiaków, a niebezpieczeństwo rozwoju neuropatii obwodowej uważa się za niewielkie.

Gemcytabina u 10% chorych może wywoływać objawy niepożądane w postaci stanów podgorączkowych, uczucia zmęczenia, bólów mięśniowych lub stawowych albo parestezji. Nie znaleziono doniesień na temat stwierdzonej neuropatii obwodowej po stosowaniu tego leku w monoterapii. W opisie przypadku zawierającym takie sugestie znajdują się informacje, że pacjent był leczony uprzednio karboplatyną [95], więc nie można wykluczyć, że była ona przyczyną powikłań. Gemcytabina jest łączona często z taksanami, pochodnymi platyny i alkaloidami barwinka, a więc lekami, które często wywołują CIPN. Nie stwierdzono, aby monoterapia gemcytabiną groziła wystąpieniem neuropatii obwodowej [96].

W przypadku 5-fluorouracylu (5-FU) u 2–5% pacjentów opisywano objawy uboczne ze strony ośrodkowego układu nerwowego [97]. Niewielka liczba przypadków CIPN została opisana podczas leczenia skojarzonego z lewamisolem [98, 99] i eniluracylem [100].

Kapecytabina jest metabolizowana do 5-FU i w związku z tym również nie stwierdzono częstego występowania CIPN po leczeniu tym preparatem. Opisywane są pojedyncze przypadki powikłań neurologicznych w postaci opadania stopy i parestezji w okolicy ust u pacjentów w przebiegu leczenia raka trzustki. Częściej przypisuje się temu lekowi wywoływanie erytrodyzestezji w zakresie stóp i dłoni. Wiąże się to raczej z miejscową reakcją skórną w postaci zaczerwienienia i obrzęku pojawiającego się kilka dni po rozpoczęciu terapii. Lek wydzielany jest przez gruczoły potowe dłoni i stóp i gromadzi się pod naskórkiem, wywołując stan zapalny. Niejednokrotnie takiemu zespołowi objawów towarzyszy uczucie pieczenia i kłucia o podobnej lokalizacji. Stwierdzono jednak, że w tym przypadku nie dochodzi do trwałego uszkodzenia obwodowego układu nerwowego [101, 102], reakcja jest zaś przemijająca.

Leki z różnych grup terapeutycznych

Suramina to lek obecnie raczej rzadko używany ze względu na swą toksyczność. Uszkodzenie obwodowego układu nerwowego dotyczy zarówno ciała komórki, aksonu, jak i osłonki mielinowej [103], dlatego CIPN wywołana przez ten lek może przybierać formę nie tylko neuropatii obwodowej, lecz także demielinizacyjnej [104].

Lanalidomid jest analogiem talidomidu i w porównaniu z nim wywołuje bardziej nasilone objawy uboczne w postaci senności i neuropatii [105].

Trójtlenek arsenu jest rzadko używany ze względu na swą toksyczność, może wywoływać zależne od dawki i długości aksonu neuropatie, częściowo ustępujące po zakończeniu terapii [106]. Tipifarnib wykazuje głównie działania hepatotoksyczne, natomiast neurotoksyczności nie zalicza się do jego głównych działań ubocznych [107].

Podsumowanie

Przedstawiony materiał obrazuje złożoność problemów związanych z patofizjologią obwodowej neuropatii wywołanej chemioterapią. Omawiane grupy leków mają zróżnicowany mechanizm działania przeciwnowotworowego, a co za tym idzie, także uszkodzenie obwodowego układu nerwowego przebiega w bardzo różny sposób. Nie można w tej sytuacji uważać CIPN za jednorodny zespół chorobowy, mimo że objawy są bardzo podobne. Badania dotychczas przeprowadzone nie dają jednoznacznych wyników będących podstawą do wysnucia wniosków na temat sposobu postępowania zarówno profilaktycznego, jak i leczniczego. Nadal jedyną, w miarę skuteczną, metodą pozostaje ograniczenie dawki lub zaprzestanie dalszej chemioterapii w wypadku wystąpienia objawów opisywanego zespołu i zastosowanie leczenia objawowego.

Podziękowania

Dziękuję Pani lek. med. Beacie Kościańskiej za cenne uwagi podczas przygotowania manuskryptu.

Piśmiennictwo

  1. Ziółkowska E, Zarzycka M, Meller A, Wiśniewski T. Powikłania oczne po radioterapii nowotworów regionu głowy i szyi – przegląd piśmiennictwa. Wspolczesna Onkol 2009; 13: 251-4.   

2. Dougherty PM, Cata JP, Cordella JV, Burton A, Weng HR, et al. Taxol-induced sensory disturbance is characterized by preferential impairment of myelinated fiber function in cancer patients. Pain 2004; 109: 132-42.   

3. Flatters SJ, Bennett GJ. Ethosuximide reverses paclitaxel- and vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. Pain 2004; 109: 150-61.   

4. Flatters SJ, Bennett GJ. Studies of peripheral sensory nerves in paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy: evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Pain 2006; 122: 245-57.   

5. Bennett GJ. Pathophysiology and animal models of cancer-related painful peripheral neuropathy. Oncologist 2010; 15: 9-12.   

6. Kaley TJ, Deangelis LM. Therapy of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Br J Haematol 2009; 145: 3-14.   

7. Windebank AJ, Grisold W. Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. J Peripheral Nerv Syst 2008; 13: 27-46.   

8. Ramirez JJ, Kaufmann SH, Windebank AJ. Paclitaxel potentiates cisplatin neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Neurology 1996; 46: A288.   

9. Sun X, Windebank AJ. Hypoxia potentiates suramin neurotoxicity in rat dorsal root ganglia in vitro. Soc Neurosci 1996; Abstr 22: 948.  

10. Pachman DR, Barton DL, Watson JC, Loprinzi CL. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: prevention and treatment. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2011; 3: 377-87.  

11. Wolf S, Barton D, Kottschade L, Grothey A, Loprinzi C. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: prevention and treatment strategies. Eur J Cancer 2008; 44: 1507-15.  

12. Verstappen CC, Koeppen S, Heimans JJ, Huijgens PC, Scheulen ME, Strumberg D, Kiburg B, Postma TJ. Dose-related vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy with unexpected off-therapy worsening. Neurology 2005; 64: 1076-1077.  

13. Casanova-Molla J, Grau-Junyent JM, Morales M, Valls-Solé J. On the relationship between nociceptive evoked potentials and intraepidermal nerve fiber density in painful sensory polyneuropathies. Pain 2011; 152: 410-8.  

14. Gajos A, Kieliś W, Szadkowska I, Chmielowska E, Niewodniczy A, Bogucki A. Opis przypadku. Nabyte neuropatie obwodowe w przebiegu gammapatii monoklonalnych. Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska 2007; 41: 169-75.

15. Chauvenet AR, Shashi V, Selsky C, Morgan E, Kurtzberg J, Bell B. Vincristine-induced neuropathy as the initial presentation of charcot-marie-tooth disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group study. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2003; 25: 316-20.  

16. Graf WD, Chance PF, Lensch MW, Eng LJ, Lipe HP, Bird TD. Severe vincristine neuropathy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. Cancer 1996; 77: 1356-62.  

17. Bakshi N, Maselli RA, Gospe SM Jr, Ellis WG, McDonald C, Mandler RN. Fulminant demyelinating neuropathy mimicking cerebral death. Muscle Nerve 1997; 20: 1595-7.  

18. Orejana-García AM, Pascual-Huerta J, Pérez-Melero A. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and vincristine. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 2003; 93: 229-33.  

19. Goetz MP, Erlichman C, Windebank AJ, et al. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of two different schedules of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, Fluorouracil, and leucovorin in patients with solid tumors. J Clin Oncol 2003; 21: 3761-9.  

20. Gregg RW, Molepo JM, Monpetit VJ, Mikael NZ, Redmond D, Ga- dia M, Stewart DJ. Cisplatin neurotoxicity: the relationship between dosage, time, and platinum concentration in neurologic tissues, and morphologic evidence of toxicity. J Clin Oncol 1992; 10: 795-803.  

21. Screnci D, McKeage MJ, Galettis P, Hambley TW, Palmer BD, Baguley BC. Relationships between hydrophobicity, reactivity, accumulation and peripheral nerve toxicity of a series of platinum drugs. Br J Cancer 2000; 82: 966-72.  

22. Thompson SW, Davis LE, Kornfeld M, Hilgers RD, Standefer JC. Cisplatin neuropathy. Clinical, electrophysiologic, morphologic, and toxicologic studies. Cancer 1984; 54: 1269-75.  

23. Anzil AP, Blinzinger K, Herrlinger H. Fenestrated blood capillaries in rat cranio-spinal sensory ganglia. Cell Tissue Res 1976; 167: 563-7.  

24. Jacobs JM. Vascular permeability and neurotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect 1978; 26: 107-16.  

25. Olsson Y. Studies on vascular permeability in peripheral nerves. IV. Distribution of intravenously injected protein tracers in the peripheral nervous system of various species. Acta Neuropathol 1971; 17: 114-26.  

26. McDonald ES, Randon KR, Knight A, Windebank AJ. Cisplatin preferentially binds to DNA in dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro and in vivo: a potential mechanism for neurotoxicity. Neurobiol Dis 2005; 18: 305-13.  

27. Ta LE, Espeset L, Podratz J, Windebank AJ. Neurotoxicity of oxaliplatin and cisplatin for dorsal root ganglion neurons correlates with platinum-DNA binding. Neurotoxicology 2006; 27: 992-1002.  

28. Gill JS, Windebank AJ. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons is associated with attempted entry into the cell cycle. J Clin Invest 1998; 101: 2842-50.  

29. Podratz JL, Schlattau AW, Chen BK, Knight AM, Windebank AJ. Platinum adduct formation in mitochondrial DNA may underlie the phenomenon of coasting. J Peripher Nerv Syst 2007; 12: 69.  

30. Eeles R, Tait DM, Peckham MJ. Lhermitte’s sign as a complication of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Cancer Treat Rep 1986; 70: 905-7.  

31. Krarup-Hansen A, Fugleholm K, Helweg-Larsen S, Hauge EN, Schmalbruch H, Trojaborg W, Krarup C. Examination of distal involvement in cisplatin-induced neuropathy in man. An electrophysiological and histological study with particular reference to touch receptor function. Brain 1993; 116: 1017-41.  

32. Fu KK, Kai EF, Leung CK. Cisplatin neuropathy: a prospective clinical and electrophysiological study in Chinese patients with ovarian carcinoma. J Clin Pharm Ther 1995; 20: 167-72.  

33. McKeage MJ. Comparative adverse effect profiles of platinum drugs. Drug Saf 1995; 13: 228-44.  

34. Ozols RF, Ostchega Y, Myers CE, Young RC. High-dose cisplatin in hypertonic saline in refractory ovarian cancer. J Clin Oncol 1985; 3: 246-50.  

35. Walsh TJ, Clark AW, Parhad IM, Green WR. Neurotoxic effects of cisplatin therapy. Arch Neurol 1982; 39: 719-20.  

36. Mollman JE, Hogan WM, Glover DJ, McCluskey LF. Unusual presentation of cis-platinum neuropathy. Neurology 1988; 38: 488-90.  

37. Grunberg SM, Sonka S, Stevenson LL, Muggia FM. Progressive paresthesias after cessation of therapy with very high-dose cisplatin. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1989; 25: 62-4.  

38. Hansen RA, Gartlehner G, Powell GE, Sandler RS. Serious adverse events with infliximab: analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5: 729-35.  

39. Gamelin E, Gamelin L, Bossi L, Quasthoff S. Clinical aspects and molecular basis of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity: current management and development of preventive measures. Semin Oncol 2002; 29: 21-33.  

40. Raymond E, Chaney SG, Taamma A, Cvitkovic E. Oxaliplatin: a review of preclinical and clinical studies. Ann Oncol 1998; 9: 1053-71.  

41. Grothey A. Oxaliplatin-safety profile: neurotoxicity. Semin Oncol 2003; 30: 5-13.  

42. Lehky TJ, Leonard GD, Wilson RH, Grem JL, Floeter MK. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: acute hyperexcitability and chronic neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 2004; 29: 387-92.  

43. Kiernan MC, Krishnan AV. The pathophysiology of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Curr Med Chem 2006; 13: 2901-7.  

44. Leonard GD, Wagner MR, Quinn MG, Grem JL. Severe disabling sensory-motor polyneuropathy during oxaliplatinbased chemotherapy. Anticancer Drugs 2004; 15: 733-5.  

45. International Collaborative Ovarian NeoPlasm Group. Paclitaxel plus carboplatin versus standard chemotherapy with either single-agent carboplatin or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in women with ovarian cancer: the ICON3 randomised trial. Lancet 2002; 360: 505-15.  

46. Voltz RD, Posner JB, Dalmau J, Graus F. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis: an update of the effects of the anti-Hu immune response on the nervous system and tumour. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997; 63: 133-6.  

47. Graus F, Keime-Guibert F, Ren~é R, Benyahia B, Ribalta T, Ascaso C, Escaramis G, Delattre JY. Anti-Hu-associated paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis: analysis of 200 patients. Brain 2001; 124: 1138-48.  

48. Bryl M, Ramlau R, Dyszkiewicz W. Postępowanie w zaawansowanych inwazyjnych grasiczakach – przegląd piśmiennictwa. Wspolczesna Onkol 2004; 8: 148-52.  

49. Albers J, Chaudhry V, Cavaletti G, Donehower R. Interventions for preventing neuropathy caused by cisplatin and related compounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007; CD005228.  

50. Paulson JC, McClure WO. Inhibition of axoplasmic transport by colchicine, podophyllotoxin, and vinblastine: an effect on microtubules. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1975; 253: 517-27.  

51. Jackson DV Jr, Castle MC, Poplack DG, Bender RA. Pharmacokinetics of vincristine in the cerebrospinal fluid of subhuman primates. Cancer Res 1980; 40: 722-4.  

52. Greig NH, Soncrant TT, Shetty HU, Momma S, Smith QR, Rapo- port SI. Brain uptake and anticancer activities of vincristine and vinblastine are restricted by their low cerebrovascular permeability and binding to plasma constituents in rat. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1990; 26: 263-8.  

53. Schaumburg H. Vinca Alkaloids. In: Experimental and Clinical Neurotoxicology. 2nd ed. Schaumburg H, Spencer P (eds.). Oxford University Press, New York 2000; 1232-5.  

54. Pan YA, Misgeld T, Lichtman JW, Sanes JR. Effects of neurotoxic and neuroprotective agents on peripheral nerve regeneration assayed by time-lapse imaging in vivo. J Neurosci 2003; 23: 11479-88.  

55. Sahenk Z, Brady ST, Mendell JR. Studies on the pathogenesis of vincristine-induced neuropathy. Muscle Nerve 1987; 10: 80-4.  

56. Iqbal Z, Ochs S. Uptake of Vinca alkaloids into mammalian nerve and its subcellular components. J Neurochem 1980; 34: 59-68.

57. Fazeny B, Zifko U, Meryn S, Huber H, Grisold W, Dittrich C. Vinorelbine-induced neurotoxicity in patients with advanced breast cancer pretreated with paclitaxel – a phase II study. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 1996; 39: 150-6.  

58. Burns BV, Shotton JC. Vocal fold palsy following vinca alkaloid treatment. J Laryngol Otol 1998; 112: 485-7.  

59. Sanderson PA, Kuwabara T, Cogan DG. Optic neuropathy presumably caused by vincristine therapy. Am J Ophthalmol 1976; 81: 146-50.  

60. Lugassy G, Shapira A. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with vincristine treatment. Blut 1990; 61: 320-1.  

61. Kalcioglu MT, Kuku I, Kaya E, Oncel S, Aydogdu I. Bilateral hearing loss during vincristine therapy: a case report. J Chemother 2003; 15: 290-2.  

62. Low PA, Vernino S, Suarez G. Autonomic dysfunction in peripheral nerve disease. Muscle Nerve 2003; 27: 646-61.  

63. Hohneker JA. A summary of vinorelbine (Navelbine) safety data from North American clinical trials. Semin Oncol 1994; 21: 42-7.  

64. Curran MP, Plosker GL. Vinorelbine: a review of its use in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Drugs Aging 2002; 19: 695-721.

65. Moudgil SS, Riggs JE. Fulminant peripheral neuropathy with severe quadriparesis associated with vincristine therapy. Ann Pharmacother 2000; 34: 1136-8.  

66. Glantz MJ, Cole BF, Glantz LK, Cobb J, Mills P, Lekos A, Walters BC, Recht LD. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology in patients with cancer: minimizing false-negative results. Cancer 1998; 82: 733-9.  

67. Dworkin RH, O'Connor AB, Backonja M, et al. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: evidence-based recommendations. Pain 2007; 132: 237-51.  

68. Finnerup NB, Sindrup SH, Jensen TS. The evidence for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain 2010; 150: 573-81.  

69. Dworkin RH, O'Connor AB, Audette J, et al. Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain: an overview and literature update. Mayo Clin Proc 2010; 85 (3 Suppl): S3-14.  

70. Dzierżanowski T, Ciałkowska-Rysz A. Neuropathic pain in palliative care patients. Medycyna Paliatywna 2010; 2: 57-66.  

71. Apfel S. Taxoids. In: Experimental and Clinical Neurotoxicology. 2nd ed. Schaumburg H, Spencer P (eds.). Oxford University Press, New York 2000; 1135-9.  

72. Postma TJ, Vermorken JB, Liefting AJ, Pinedo HM, Heimans JJ. Paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Ann Oncol 1995; 6: 489-94.  

73. Hilkens PH, Verweij J, Vecht CJ, Stoter G, van den Bent MJ. Clinical characteristics of severe peripheral neuropaty induced by docetaxel (Taxotere). Ann Oncol 1997; 8: 187-90.  

74. Boillot A, Cordier A, Guerault E, Julliot MC, Balvay P, Billerey C, Barale F (1989): A rare case of severe toxic peripheral neuropathy: poisoning by podophyllin. Apropos of 1 case. J Toxicol Clin Exp 1989; 9: 409-12.  

75. Rogalska A, Marczak A, Szwed M, Gajek A, Jóźwiak Z. Epotilony – nadzieja dla pacjentów niewrażliwych na leczenie taksanami. Wspolczesna Onkol 2010; 14: 205-10.  

76. Brat DJ, Windebank AJ, Brimijoin S. Emulsifier for intravenous cyclosporin inhibits neurite outgrowth, causes deficits in rapid axonal transport and leads to structural abnormalities in differentiating N1E.115 neuroblastoma. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1992; 261: 803-10.  

77. Bilińska M, Usnarska-Zubkiewicz L, Dmoszyńska A. Polineuropatia wywołana talidomidem i bortezomibem u chorych na szpiczaka mnogiego, możliwości leczenia bólu neuropatycznego. Zalecenia Polskiej Grupy Szpiczakowej. Wspolczesna Onkol 2008; 12: 441-6.  

78. Patel SR, Vadhan-Raj S, Papadopolous N, Plager C, Burgess MA, Hays C, Benjamin RS. High-dose ifosfamide in bone and soft tissue sarcomas: results of phase II and pilot studies – dose-response and schedule dependence. J Clin Oncol 1997; 15: 2378-84.  

79. Spivack SD. Drugs 5 years later: procarbazine. Ann Intern Med 1974; 81: 795-800.  

80. Gutin PH, Levi JA, Wiernik PH, Walker MD. Treatment of malignant meningeal disease with intrathecal thioTEPA: a phase II study. Cancer Treat Rep 1977; 61: 885-7.  

81. Martín Algarra S, Henriquez I, Rebollo J, Artieda J. Severe polyneuropathy and motor loss after intrathecal thiotepa combination chemotherapy: description of two cases. Anticancer Drugs 1990; 1: 33-5.  

82. Cairncross G, Swinnen L, Bayer R, et al. Myeloablative chemotherapy for recurrent aggressive oligodendroglioma. Neuro Oncol 2000; 2: 114-9.  

83. Cho ES. Toxic effects of adriamycin on the ganglia of the peripherial nervous system: a neuropathological study. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1977; 36: 907-15.  

84. Bigotte L, Olsson Y. Retrograde transport of doxorubicin (adriamycin) in peripheral nerves of mice. Neurosci Lett 1982; 32: 217-21.  

85. Koh S, Nelson MD Jr, Kovanlikaya A, Chen LS. Anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy after intrathecal methotrexate treatment. Pediatr Neurol 1999; 21: 576-8.  

86. Moore BE, Somers NP, Smith TW. Methotrexate-related nonnecrotizing multifocal axonopathy detected by beta-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2002; 126: 79-81.  

87. Boogerd W, Moffie D, Smets LA. Early blindness and coma during intrathecal chemotherapy for meningeal carcinomatosis. Cancer 1990; 65: 452-7.  

88. Harila-Saari AH, Huuskonen UE, Tolonen U, Vainionpää LK, Lanning BM. Motor nervous pathway function is impaired after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a study with moor evoked potentials. Med Pediatr Oncol 2001; 36: 345-51.  

89. Ionasescu VV. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies: from clinical description to molecular genetics. Muscle Nerve 1995; 18: 267-75.  

90. Shibutani M, Okeda R, Hori A, Schipper H. Methotrexate-related multifocal axonopathy. Report of an autopsy case. Acta Neuropathol 1989; 79: 333-5.  

91. Weiss S, Kahn Y. Intrathecal methotrexate causing paraplegia in a middle-aged woman. Acta Haematol 1978; 60: 59-61.  

92. Kornblau SM, Cortes-Franco J, Estey E. Neurotoxicity associated with fludarabine and cytosine arabinoside chemotherapy for acute leukemia and myelodysplasia. Leukemia 1993; 7: 378-83.  

93. Russell JA, Powles RL. Letter: neuropathy due to cytosine arabinoside. Br Med J 1974; 4: 652-3.  

94. Cheson BD, Vena DA, Foss FM, Sorensen JM. Neurotoxicity of purine analogs: a review. J Clin Oncol 1994; 12: 2216-28.  

95. Dormann AJ, Grünewald T, Wigginghaus B, Huchzermeyer H. Gemcitabine-associated autonomic neuropathy. Lancet 1998; 351: 644.  

96. Colomer R, Llombart-Cussac A, Lluch A, et al. Biweekly paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer: phase II trial and predictive value of HER2 extracellular domain. Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 201-6.  

97. Allegra CJ, Grem JL. Antimetabolites. In: Cancer Principles and Practice in Oncology. 5th ed. De Vita V, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.). Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia 1997; 432-52.  

98. Moertel CG, Fleming TR, Macdonald JS, et al. Levamisole and fluorouracil for adjuvant therapy of resected colon carcinoma. N Engl J Med 1990; 322: 352-8.  

99. Stein ME, Drumea K, Yarnitsky D, Benny A, Tzuk-Shina T. A rare event of 5-fluorouracil-associated peripheral neuropathy: a report of two patients. Am J Clin Oncol 1998; 21: 248-9.

100. Saif MW, Wilson RH, Harold N, Keith B, Dougherty DS, Grem JL. Peripheral neuropathy associated with weekly oral 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and eniluracil. Anticancer Drugs 2001; 12: 525-31.

101. Hamilton S. Hand-foot syndrome. 2005; http://www.chemocare.com/managing/handfoot_syndrome.asp

102. Nagore E, Insa A, Sanmartín O. Antineoplastic therapyinduced palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia (“hand-foot”) syndrome. Incidence, recognition and management. Am J Clin Dermatol 2000; 1: 225-34.

103. Russell JW, Gill JS, Sorenson EJ, Schultz DA, Windebank AJ. Suramin-induced neuropathy in an animal model. J Neurol Sci 2001; 192: 71-80.

104. Chaudhry V, Eisenberger MA, Sinibaldi VJ, Sheikh K, Griffin JW, Cornblath DR. A prospective study of suramin-induced peripheral neuropathy. Brain 1996; 119: 2039-52.

105. Hussein MA. Lenalidomide: patient management strategies. Semin Hematol 2005; 42: 22-5.

106. Hansen RA, Gartlehner G, Powell GE, Sandler RS. Serious adverse events with infliximab: analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5: 729-35.

107. Robertson MJ, Kahl BS, Vose JM, et al. Phase II study of enzastaurin, a protein kinase C beta inhibitor, in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol 2007; 25: 1741-6.

Address for correspondence

Krzysztof Brzeziński

Poradnia Leczenia Bólu

Instytut Medycyny Wsi w Lublinie

ul. Jaczewskiego 2

20-090 Lublin

tel. 605 228 412

e-mail: k.brzezinski@op.pl



Submitted: 14.01.2012

Accepted: 15.02.2012
Copyright: © 2012 Termedia Sp. z o. o. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
Quick links
© 2019 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe