eISSN: 1897-4309
ISSN: 1428-2526
Contemporary Oncology/Współczesna Onkologia
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Supplements Addendum Special Issues Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
1/2012
vol. 16
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Case report

Effective therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma – on the basis of a clinical case
[Polish version: Skuteczne postępowanie terapeutyczne w nieresekcyjnym raku wątrobowokomórkowym – na przykładzie przypadku klinicznego p. 64]

Joanna Omyła-Staszewska, Andrzej Deptała

Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (1): 60–63
[Polish version: Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (1): 64–67]
Online publish date: 2012/02/29
Article files
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common tumours worldwide, accounting for 5.7% of all cancer cases [1, 2]. The HCC is the third most frequent cause of cancer deaths worldwide and the seventh most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe [3, 4]. A total of 1,300 new cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma and nearly 2000 HACC-related deaths were recorded in Poland in 2007. Higher mortality relative to incidence suggests inadequate registration of HCC cases. Another fact worth noting is the ongoing increase in HCC incidence over the past 2-3 decades in countries with a high socioeconomic status, in which this cancer type was not an epidemiological problem until recently. The rise in incidence observed in the USA, Europe or Japan parallels the increase in the number of patients suffering from cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis C and the growing incidence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The NASH, in turn, is a consequence of obesity causing insulin resistance and induction of oxidative stress due to chronic inflammation [5, 6]. The prognosis in primary hepatocellular carcinoma is poor because the disease is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and the rate of 5-year survival in Europe does not exceed 9% [7]. Prolonged survival of HCC patients achieved as a result of introduction of sorafenib into cancer therapy has given rise to a number of trials and clinical practice observations with a view to establishing therapeutic management standards of HCC patients. Consequently, the present study seeks to outline an optimum management strategy in HCC therapy on the basis of a specific clinical case.

Case report

A man aged 56 years old, suffering from alcohol-induced cirrhosis, hypertension and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in early August 2008 on the basis of biopsy of the dominant tumorous lesion located in the right liver lobe. Abdominal CT scan performed on 30 Sept 2008 revealed abnormalities including hepatomegaly (liver measuring 176 mm in the c-c direction) and – in the arterial phase of the CT examination – heterogeneous hypervascular lesions (the largest focal lesion located at a border between hepatic segments 8 and 7, measuring 55 mm  43 mm, and around a dozen satellite foci scattered throughout the liver) which were isodense with the liver parenchyma in the portal phase of CT. Other findings included multiple lymph nodes of borderline size. No signs of portal vein thrombosis or ascites were identified.

In December 2008, following consultation in the Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery of the Warsaw Medical University, the patient was excluded from surgery due to multifocal nature of the cancer process with coexisting liver cirrhosis. Instead, the patient was referred for local treatment using the method of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Two TACE sessions were performed, on 2 Feb 2009 and 12 Mar 2009. The patient received injections of doxorubicin in lipiodol into the hepatic artery. Follow-up abdominal CT scan performed on 9 Apr 2009 failed to show a regression of lesions in the liver (compared to the examination of 30 Sept 2008), however provided evidence that their size and number had stabilized. Furthermore, calcifications were found within the largest lesion located at the border between segments 8 and 7, and less contrast enhancement was demonstrated in the other foci.

In March 2009 the patient was admitted to the Department of Oncology and Haematology of the Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Administration in Warsaw to begin palliative chemotherapy with sorafenib. In view of the patient’s stage B hepatocellular carcinoma (according to the BCLC classification), very good performance status (score 0 according to the ECOG scale) and lack of hepatic impairment (class A in the Child-Pough score = 5 points), targeted therapy with sorafenib (Nexavar) at 800 mg/day (2  400 mg) was initiated on 11 Apr 2009. Seven days after beginning the first chemotherapy cycle the patient reported quite severe abdominal pain and very intense reddening of the skin over the whole body, accompanied by large papular rash with a tendency to become bacterially infected. Due to observed grade 3 skin toxicity according to CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events), sorafenib was discontinued on day 8 of the first chemotherapy cycle. Abdominal pain subsided and skin symptoms were reduced to CTCAE toxicity grade 1 within 7 days from drug discontinuation. Sorafenib was then reinstituted at half of the original dose (400 mg/day). After reducing the dose, adverse skin reactions did not become more severe than toxicity grade 1 over the next two cycles of treatment. From June 2009 onwards, however, the patient’s skin lesions occasionally progressed to CTCAE toxicity grade 2. The therapy was not discontinued, however due to previous adverse reactions no attempt was made to date to reintroduce the full standard dose of sorafenib. Another two TACE sessions were performed on 24 Apr 2009 and 5 June 2009, respectively.

Follow-up CT examinations conducted at regular 3-month intervals from April 2009 onwards demonstrated a gradual regression of the largest focal lesion located at the border between hepatic segments 7 and 8, and stabilization of the size of satellite lesions. Laboratory tests performed in December 2009 showed a very high concentration of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), reaching 1,758 ng/ml. Laboratory tests, however, did not correlate with results of imaging studies (abdominal and chest CT) performed on 7 Jan 2010, which ruled out progression of the disease. Between February and June 2010, the AFP level was found to be gradually decreasing from 136 ng/ml to 107 ng/ml. The test performed on 2 Sept 2011 showed the AFP concentration to be 58 ng/ml. The best radiological response was demonstrated in the abdominal CT scan performed on 18 Oct 2010 revealing a reduction in dimensions of the largest focal lesion to 13 mm  26 mm (vs. 55 mm  43 mm at baseline), which according to RECIST 1.1 (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours 1.1) corresponds to partial response (PR). The latest abdominal CT scan, performed on 2 Sept 2011, confirmed stabilization of the cancer process – the largest lesion was 24 mm  17 mm in size and the number and size of satellite foci were unchanged. The subsequent treatment cycle was started on 7 Sept 2011 and therapy has been continued ever since.

Discussion

The Barcelona staging system (BCLC) is commonly recognized as the optimum classification for assessing the stage of HCC [8]. Patients with good performance status and early-stage HCC (0 and A according to the BCLC) are potential candidates for surgery (tumour resection, liver transplant) or ablation therapy [9-11]. Ablation methods including PEI (percutaneous ethanol injection) or RFA (radiofrequency ablation) are recommended in cases of unresectable early HCC [10]. The preferred method of local treatment in this group of patients is RFA, with PEI being currently less popular in clinical practice. Patients with intermediate (BCLC stage B) and advanced (BCLC stage C) HCC undergo TACE (transarterial chemoembolization) or systemic therapy, respectively.

Transarterial chemoembolization is used in patients with unresectable HCC at BCLC stage B if no macroscopic vascular infiltration is identified in the liver and there is no evidence for extrahepatic metastases [8, 9, 11]. This applies to 30-40% of all HCC cases [12]. Patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pough score C), portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis do not qualify for the procedure despite local progression of the disease. A metaanalysis of randomized clinical trials has shown that TACE-based treatment of patients with BCLC stage B, good performance status (0-1), Child-Pugh score A (or B = 7 points) for liver function and without portal vein invasion makes it possible to extend overall survival to 11-20 months [13, 14]. The objective response rate for the therapeutic technique ranges from 16 to 61% [15].

Transarterial chemoembolization involves the infusion of cytotoxic agents in a mixture with lipiodol into hepatic arteries (in Europe usually doxorubicin, in Asia – cisplatin). Lipiodol occludes hepatic artery branches supplying blood to the tumour, while the cytostatic is released into cancer cells. The process causes cell apoptosis and, in the next stage, cancer tissue necrosis as a result of local inhibition of angiogenesis in HCC which is a well-vascularized tumour type. Consequently, a number of growth factors are activated including HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) [16]. As the key inducer of angiogenesis, VEGF participates in all stages of the process. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis facilitates the interaction between cancer cells and blood vessels, thus opening up the way for cancer invasion. The most important regulator of VEGF expression is hypoxia. Hypoxia stimulates vascular growth via the signal pathway of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), especially HIF-1 [17]. As a result of hypoxia, HIF-1 induces VEGF expression leading to the development of new blood vessels and increased oxygen supply. Li et al. confirmed a large elevation of serum VEGF concentration after TACE, which is a major factor promoting tumour growth [16, 17]. Therefore, the combined use of TACE and inhibitors with antiangiogenic properties seems justified.

Sorafenib (BAY43-9006), a drug which was introduced into clinical practice resulting in prolonged survival of HCC patients [18, 19], is a small-molecular multikinase inhibitor which – by suppressing cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinases C-RAF and B-RAF (RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway) and receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, PDGFR-, c-KIT and FLT3 – is able to inhibit tumour angiogenesis [20]. One of clinical studies conducted to date has shown that the sorafenib plus doxorubicin combination in the treatment of HCC patients prolongs median overall survival (14 months) versus doxorubicin alone (5.6 months) [21]. There are several strategies for combining sorafenib with TACE (with doxorubicin): the sequential approach (targeted therapy introduced after completing TACE sessions), the intermittent approach (sorafenib suspended for the duration of chemoembolization treatment) and the continuous approach [22]. The continuous regimen of sorafenib with TACE seems to be the most effective approach because of early onset of TACE-induced activation of growth factors, observed several hours after initiating the local treatment method [22].

A phase I trial [23] assessing the safety and tolerance of the TACE plus sorafenib combination in BCLC grade B patients suffering from HCC failed to identify significant differences in the frequency and severity of observed adverse reactions compared to results obtained in trials analyzing sorafenib [20] and TACE [24] used in monotherapy. The hand-foot syndrome occurred in 21% of patients. Diarrhoea was observed in 50% of patients, however the percentage of patients experiencing the adverse reaction at toxicity grade 3 was 8%. Abdominal pain was much more common in combination treatment (28%) than sorafenib monotherapy (8%), which is a likely consequence of the so-called post-embolization syndrome, a complication secondary to TACE. Acute cholecystitis, also associated with TACE, was observed in 7% of patients [23]. Thrombocytopenia was the only adverse reaction identified more commonly in combined therapy at toxicity grade 3. The reaction developed in 21% of patients vs. 4% of patients treated with sorafenib in monotherapy [20]. The same trial [23], in addition to assessing the safety and toxicity profiles, also sought to determine circulating VEGF levels at baseline and 20 hours after the first TACE session. A significant reduction in circulating VEGF concentration was obtained for the combined regimen, which corroborated the theoretical claim that the release of this growth factor could be effectively suppressed during TACE by administering molecularly targeted drugs [23].

Several phase II clinical trials are now under way to assess the safety and efficacy of the sorafenib plus TACE combination, and to establish an optimum management regimen for the treatment. During the American Society of Clinical Oncology conference held in 2010, Chung et al. announced preliminary results of their phase II clinical trial investigating the combination treatment in patients with unresectable HCC [25]. In the trial, sorafenib was combined with TACE in an intermittent regimen. The patients started systemic therapy 4 days after a TACE procedure, while sorafenib was interrupted for 4 days before each local treatment session. Out of 50 patients included in preliminary analysis, complete remission was observed in 18 (36%) patients, while partial remission or stabilization of the cancer process was achieved in 30 (60%) of patients. Cancer progression occurred in 2 patients (4% of assessed patients) [25].

Another multi-centre phase II trial (SOCRATES) [26] also evaluated the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic combination of sorafenib and TACE. The trial, however, used a different intermittent regimen for sorafenib and TACE administration than Chung et al. Sorafenib was introduced 2 weeks prior to the first TACE procedure and interrupted 3 days before the next chemoembolization session. Targeted therapy was resumed after local treatment, usually one day after the subsidence of signs of hepatic impairment. Preliminary results of the study, in the form of an abstract, were presented at the annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in 2011. Stabilization of the cancer process was achieved in the majority of patients (34 out of 45 study patients). There were no cases of complete remission, while partial clinical response was noted in one patient. Median TTP (time to progression) was 526 days, while medial overall survival – 562 days. High hopes for determining benefits of sorafenib-based targeted therapy combined with TACE in patients with intermediate cancer (BCLC stage B) are placed on results of the ongoing multi-centre randomized clinical trial (SPACE) [27]. The trial involves 300 randomized patients. Sorafenib is administered on a continuous basis, while chemoembolization is performed on day 1 of cycles 1, 3, 7, 13, and every 6 cycles of systemic treatment thereafter.

Results of studies completed to date confirm beneficial effects (in terms of efficacy and safety) of sorafenib used in conjunction with TACE in patients with inoperable HCC at the BCLC intermediate stage B. Despite a different (sequential) approach, the achievement of PR in the case described above corroborates other studies. It is hoped that treatment-associated toxicity could be reduced and the outcome improved thanks to using TACE with particles preloaded with doxorubicin (DEB-TACE). Results of phase III ECOG 1208 trial may be able to provide some answers to existing questions [28].

References

 1. Parkin DM, Bray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002. CA Cancer J Clin 2005; 55: 74-108.  

2. Boyle P, Levin B. World Cancer Report. IARC Press, Lyon 2008.  

3. Bosch FX, Ribes J, Diaz M. Cleries R. Primary liver cancer world-wide incidence and trends. Gastroenterology 2004; 127 (supl. 10): 5-16.  

4. El-Serag HB. Hepatocellular carcinoma: an epidemiologic view. J Clin Gastroenterol 2002; 35 (supl. 1): 72-8.  

5. Sligte K, Bourass I, Sels JP, et al. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: review of growing medical problem. Eur J Intern Med 2004; 15: 10-21.  

6. Neuschwander-Tetri BA. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and the metabolic syndrome. Am J Med Sci 2005; 330: 326-35.  

7. Sant M, Allemani C, Santaquilani M, et al. EUROCARE-4. Survival of cancer patients diagnosed In 1995-1999. Results and commentary. Eur J Cancer 2009; 45: 931-91.  

8. Bruix J, Sherman M. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: an update. Hepatology 2011; 53: 1020-2.  

9. Llovet JM, Bruix J. Novel advancements in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma in 2008. J Heaptol 2008; 48 (supl.1): S20-S37.

10. Sandhu DS, Tharayii VS, Lai JP, Roberts LR. Treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Heaptol 2008; 2: 81-92.

11. Bruix J, Llovet JM. Major achievements in hepatocellular carcinoma. Lancet 2009; 373: 614-6.

12. Camma C, Schepis F, Orlando A, et al. Transarterial chemoembolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Radiology 2002; 224: 47-54.

13. Llovet JM, Bruix J. Systematic review of randomized trials for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: Chemoembolization improves survival. Hepatology 2003; 37: 429-42.

14. Bruix J, Sala M, Llovet JM. Chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. Gastroenterology 2004; 127: S179-S188.

15. Li X, Feng GS, Zheng CS, Zhuo CK, Liu X. Influence of transarterial chemoembolization on angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in rat with Walker-256 transplanted hepatoma: An experimental study. World J Gastroenterol 2003; 9: 2445-2449.

16. Sergio A, Cristofori C, Cardin R, et al. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): the role of angiogenesis and invasiveness. Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103: 914-21.

17. Li Z, Hu DY, Chu Q, Wu JH, Gao C, Zhang YQ, Huang YR. Cell apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocellular carcinoma after transarterial chemoembolization. World J Gastroenterol 2004; 10: 1876-80.

18. Llovet JM, Ricci S, Mazzaferro V, et al. Sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. N Engl J Med 2008; 359: 378-90.

19. Cheng AL, Kang YK, Chen Z, et al. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients in the Asia-Pacific region with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase III randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Oncol 2009; 10: 25-34.

20. Keating GM, Santoro A. Sorafenib. A review of its use in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs 2009; 69: 223-40.

21. Abou-Alfa GK, Johnson P, Knox J, et al. Preliminary results from a Phase II, randomized, double-blind study of sorafenib plus doxorubicin versus placebo plus doxorubicin in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Presented at: ECCO 14-European Cancer Conference. Barcelona, Spain, 23-27 September 2007.

22. Strebel BM, Dufour JF. Combined approach to hepatocellular carcinoma: A new treatment concept for nonresectable disease. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2008; 8: 1743-9.

23. Dufour JF, Hoppe H, Heim MH, et al. Continuous administration of sorafenib in combination with transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: results of a phase I study. Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103: 914-21.

24. Marelli L, Stigliano R, Triantos C, et al. Transarterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: Which technique is more effective? A systematic review of cohort and randomized studies. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 2007; 30: 6-25.

25. Chung Y, Kim B, Chen C, et al. Study in Asia of the combination of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma trial (START): second interim safety and efficacy analysis. J Clin Oncol 2010; 28[15S]: 4026.

26. Erhardt A, Kolligs FT, Dollinger MM, et al. TACE plus sorafenib for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: Final results of the multicenter SOCRATES trial. Presented at 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting. Abstract 4107 General.

27. Lencioni R, Zou J, Leberre M. Sorafenib (SOR) or placebo (PL) in combination with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (SPACE). J Clin Oncol 2010; 28: 15s.

28. Uller W, Wiggermann P, Gössmann H, Klebl F, Salzberger B, Stroszczynski C, Jung EM. Chemoembolization with epirubicin drug-eluting beads (DEB-TACE) to treat early and intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma. J Clin Oncol 2010; 28: 15s (abstract 4141).

Address for correspondence

Joanna Omyła-Staszewska

Klinika Onkologii i Hematologii

Centralny Szpital Kliniczny MSWiA

ul. Wołoska 137

02-507 Warszawa

e-mail: joannaomyla@gmail.com



Submitted: 19.09.2011

Accepted: 22.12.2011

Wstęp

Pierwotny rak wątrobowokomórkowy (hepatocellular carcinoma – HCC) należy do najczęstszych nowotworów na świecie – stanowi 5,7% wszystkich zachorowań na nowotwory złośliwe [1, 2]. Nowotwór ten jest 3. przyczyną zgonów z powodu chorób nowotworowych w świecie i 7. w Europie [3, 4]. W Polsce w 2007 r. na pierwotnego raka wątroby zachorowało 1300 osób, a zmarło prawie 2000; większa umieralność niż zachorowalność świadczy o niedostatecznej rejestracji zachorowań. Na uwagę zasługuje stały wzrost zachorowań na HCC w ciągu 2–3 ostatnich dekad w krajach o wysokim statusie socjoekonomicznym, w których nowotwór ten jeszcze do niedawna nie stanowił problemu epidemiologicznego. Wzrost ten w Stanach Zjednoczonych, Europie czy Japonii spowodowany jest przede wszystkim zwiększeniem liczby chorych na marskość wątroby będącą następstwem wirusowego zapalenia typu C (WZW C), a także wzrastającą liczbą przypadków niealkoholowego stłuszczeniowego zapalenia wątroby (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis – NASH), które jest konsekwencją otyłości i wynikającej z niej insulinooporności oraz indukcji stresu oksydacyjnego na skutek przewlekłego zapalenia [5, 6]. Rokowanie w pierwotnym raku wątroby jest złe, ponieważ choroba jest najczęściej rozpoznawana w stadium zaawansowanym i odsetek przeżyć pięcioletnich w Europie nie przekracza 9% [7]. Przedłużenie życia chorym na HCC, które dokonało się w wyniku wprowadzenia do terapii sorafenibu, zapoczątkowało serię badań oraz obserwacji z praktyki klinicznej, których celem ostatecznym jest ustalenie standardów postępowania z chorymi na HCC. Dlatego w obecnej pracy autorzy, na kanwie opisu konkretnego przypadku klinicznego, pokusili się o przedstawienie strategii optymalnego postępowania w HCC.

Opis przypadku

U 56-letniego mężczyzny z marskością poalkoholową wątroby, nadciśnieniem tętniczym i cukrzycą typu 2 leczoną insuliną na początku sierpnia 2008 r. ustalono rozpoznanie HCC na podstawie biopsji dominującej zmiany guzowatej prawego płata wątroby. W tomografii komputerowej (TK) jamy brzusznej wykonanej dnia 30.09.2008 r. z odchyleń od stanu prawidłowego stwierdzono hepatomegalię (wątroba o wymiarze c-c 176 mm), a w fazie tętniczej badania zmiany hiperwaskularne w wątrobie o niejednorodnej strukturze (największa zmiana ogniskowa zlokalizowana na pograniczu segmentu 8. i 7. o średnicy 55 mm  43 mm oraz kilkanaście ognisk satelitarnych rozsianych w całej wątrobie), które w fazie wrotnej badania były izodensyjne z miąższem wątroby, a także liczne węzły chłonne granicznej wielkości, bez cech zakrzepicy żyły wrotnej i bez wodobrzusza.

W grudniu 2008 r. po konsultacji w Klinice Chirurgii Ogólnej, Transplantacyjnej i Wątroby Warszawskiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego pacjent nie został poddany zabiegowi chirurgicznemu z uwagi na wieloogniskowy charakter procesu nowotworowego przy współistniejącej marskości wątroby, ale zakwalifikowano go do leczenia miejscowego z zastosowaniem przeztętniczej chemoembolizacji (transcatheter arterial chemoembolization – TACE). W dniach 02.02.2009 r. i 12.03.2009 r. wykonano 2 zabiegi TACE z podaniem do tętnicy wątrobowej doksorubicyny w roztworze lipiodolu. Kontrolne badanie TK jamy brzusznej wykonane 09.04.2009 r. nie wykazało regresji zmian w wątrobie (w porównaniu z badaniem z 30.09.2008 r.), ale potwierdziło stabilizację ich wielkości oraz liczby i ujawniło obecność zwapnień w obrębie największej zmiany zlokalizowanej na pograniczu segmentu 8. i 7. oraz słabsze wysycenie kontrastem wszystkich pozostałych ognisk.

W marcu 2009 r. chory został przyjęty do Kliniki Onkologii i Hematologii CSK MSWiA w Warszawie celem rozpoczęcia paliatywnej chemioterapii z zastosowaniem sorafenibu. Z uwagi na stadium B wg klasyfikacji BCLC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer), bardzo dobry stopień sprawności pacjenta (wg skali ECOG 0) i brak upośledzenia funkcji wątroby (stopień A wg skali Child-Pough = 5 punktów) dnia 11.04.2009r. rozpoczęto terapię celowaną z zastosowaniem sorafenibu (Nexavaru) w dawce 800 mg/dobę (2  400 mg). Siedem dni po rozpoczęciu pierwszego cyklu chemioterapii u chorego wystąpiły bóle jamy brzusznej o znacznym nasileniu oraz bardzo intensywne zaczerwienie skóry całego ciała ze współistniejącą masywną grudkowopodobną wysypką z tendencją do nadkażenia bakteryjnego wykwitów. Z powodu obserwowanej toksyczności skórnej 3. stopnia wg CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) w 8. dobie pierwszego cyklu terapii odstawiono sorafenib. W ciągu 7 dni po odstawieniu leku bóle jamy brzusznej ustąpiły, nastąpiła też redukcjaa objawów skórnych do 1. stopnia toksyczności wg CTCAE. Do terapii włączono sorafenib w dawce zredukowanej o 50% (400 mg/dobę). Po zastosowaniu dawki zredukowanej sorafenibu w kolejnych 2 cyklach leczenia nie doszło do nasilenia działań niepożądanych ze strony skóry > 1. stopnia toksyczności. Od czerwca 2009 r. okresowo obserwowano jednak nasilanie się zmian skórnych do 2. sto­pnia toksyczności wg CTCAE. Terapii nie przerwano, ale z tego powodu nie podjęto (do chwili obecnej) próby powrotu do zastosowania pełnej należnej dawki sorafenibu. W dniach 24.04.2009 r. i 05.06.2009 r. wykonano ponownie 2 zabiegi TACE.

Kontrolne badania TK wykonywane od kwietnia 2009 r. regularnie co 3 miesiące wykazywały stopniową regresję największej zmiany ogniskowej na pograniczu segmentu 7. i 8., ze stabilizacją wielkości zmian satelitarnych. W badaniach laboratoryjnych z grudnia 2009 r. stwierdzono bardzo wysokie stężenie -fetoproteiny (AFP) rzędu 1758 ng/ml. Nie korelowało to jednak z wynikami badań obrazowych (tomografia komputerowa jamy brzusznej i klatki piersiowej) wykonanymi dnia 07.01.2010 r., które wykluczyły progresję choroby. W okresie od lutego do czerwca 2010 r. obserwowano stopniowe zmniejszanie się stężenia AFP z wartości 136 ng/ml do 107 ng/ml. W oznaczeniu z 02.09.2011r. zanotowano stężenie AFP o wartości 58 ng/ml. Najlepszą odpowiedź radiologiczną stwierdzono w badaniu TK jamy brzusznej wykonanym 18.10.2010 r., w którym odnotowano zmniejszenie się wymiarów największej zmiany ogniskowej do 13 mm  26 mm, w porównaniu z jej wielkością (55 mm  43 mm) w badaniu wyjściowym, co wg kryteriów odpowiedzi na leczenie RECIST wersja 1.1 (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours 1.1) odpowiada częściowej odpowiedzi (partial response – PR). Wykonane ostatnio 02.09.2011r. badanie TK jamy brzusznej potwierdziło utrzymywanie się stabilizacji procesu nowotworowego (średnica wyżej opisywanej największej zmiany wynosi 24 mm × 17 mm, wielkość i liczba ognisk satelitarnych się nie zmieniły). Kolejny cykl leczenia pacjent rozpoczął 07.09.2011 r. i nadal go kontynuuje.

Dyskusja

Powszechnie uznaną za optymalną dla określania stopnia zaawansowania HCC jest klasyfikacja barcelońska (BCLC) [8]. Chorzy w dobrym stanie sprawności i z wczesnym HCC (0 i A wg klasyfikacji BCLC) są potencjalnymi kandydatami do leczenia chirurgicznego (resekcja guza, transplantacja wątroby) lub zabiegów ablacji [9–11]. W przypadkach nieresekcyjnych wczesnego HCC zalecane jest zastosowanie metod ablacyjnych: przezskórnej injekcji etanolu (percutaneous etanol injection – PEI) lub termicznej ablacji prądem wysokiej częstotliwości (radiofrequency ablation – RFA) [10]. Preferowaną metodą leczenia miejscowego w tej grupie chorych jest RFA, PEI ma obecnie mniejsze zastosowanie kliniczne. U chorych w pośrednim (B wg BCLC) i zaawansowanym stadium choroby (C wg BCLC) stosuje się odpowiednio TACE lub chemioterapię systemową.

Przeztętnicza chemoembolizacja jest stosowana u chorych z nieresekcyjnym HCC w pośrednim stopniu zaawansowania B według klasyfikacji BCLC, jeśli nie stwierdza się makroskopowego nacieku naczyń krwionośnych w wątrobie i rozsiewu pozawątrobowego [8, 9, 11]. Dotyczy to 30–40% wszystkich przypadków HCC [12]. Chorzy z niewydolnością wątroby w skali Child-Pough C, z nadciśnieniem wrotnym i zakrzepicą żyły wrotnej, mimo miejscowego zaawansowania procesu nowotworowego, nie są kandydatami do tej procedury. Metaanaliza badań klinicznych z randomizacją wykazała, że zastosowanie TACE w leczeniu chorych w stadium B wg BCLC i w dobrym stanie sprawności (PS 0-1) oraz z funkcją wątroby A wg skali Child-Pough (ew. B = 7 pkt) i bez inwazji żyły wrotnej, pozwala na wydłużenia całkowitego czasu ich przeżycia do 11–20 miesięcy [13, 14]. Odsetek obiektywnych odpowiedzi przy zastosowaniu tej metody terapeutycznej wynosi 16–61% [15].

Przeztętnicza chemioembolizacja polega na podaniu do tętnic wątrobowych leków cytotoksycznych (w Europie najczęściej doksorubicyny, w Azji – cisplatyny) w roztworze lipiodolu. Lipiodol zamyka gałęzie tętnicy wątrobowej zaopatrujące guz, cytostatyk jest uwalniany do komórek nowotworowych. Powoduje to apoptozę komórek, a w dalszym etapie martwicę tkanki nowotworowej na skutek miejscowego zahamowania angiogenezy w dobrze unaczynionym guzie nowotworowym, jakim jest HCC. Wynikiem tych zjawisk jest aktywacja wielu czynników wzrostu, w tym czynnika indukującego hipoksję  (hipoxia-inducible factor-1 – HIF-1) i naczyniowo-śródbłonkowego czynnika wzrostu (vascular endothelial growth factor – VEGF) [16]. Naczyniowo-śródbłonkowy czynnik wzrostu jest kluczowym induktorem angiogenezy, który uczestniczy we wszystkich jej etapach. Angiogeneza indukowana przez VEGF ułatwia kontakt komórek nowotworowych z naczyniami krwionośnymi, otwierając tym samym drogę inwazji nowotworu. Najważniejszym regulatorem ekspresji VEGF jest niedotlenienie (hipoksja). Niedotlenienie powoduje stymulację rozwoju naczyń poprzez szlak sygnałowy czynników indukowanych przez hipoksję, zwłaszcza HIF-1 [17]. W następstwie niedotlenienia czynnik HIF-1 indukuje ekspresję VEGF, co prowadzi do tworzenia nowych naczyń i zwiększenia dopływu tlenu. Li i wsp. potwierdzili bardzo znaczny wzrost stężenia VEGF w surowicy po zastosowaniu TACE, co jest bardzo ważnym czynnikiem promującym wzrost guza [16, 17]. Dlatego też zasadne wydaje się skojarzenie TACE z lekami hamującymi działającymi antyangiogennie.

Sorafenib (BAY43-9006), którego wprowadzenie do praktyki klinicznej zaowocowało przedłużeniem życia chorych na HCC [18, 19], jest drobnocząsteczkowym inhibitorem wielokinazowym, który blokując cytoplazmatyczne kinazy serynowo-treoninowe C-RAF i B-RAF (szlak RAS-RAF-MAPK) oraz receptorowe kinazy tyrozynowe VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, PDGFR-, c-KIT i FLT3, hamuje angiogenezę nowotworową [20]. W jednym z przeprowadzonych badań klinicznych wykazano, że skojarzenie sorafenibu z doksorubicyną u pacjentów z HCC wydłuża medianę przeżycia całkowitego (14 miesięcy) w porównaniu z chorymi otrzymującymi samą doksorubicynę (5,6 miesiąca) [21]. Sorafenib w skojarzeniu z TACE (z użyciem doksorubicyny) może być podawany w sposób sekwencyjny (włączenie terapii celowanej po zakończeniu TACE), przerywany (odstawienie sorafenibu w trakcie zabiegów chemoembolizacji) i ciągły [22]. Metoda ciągłego podawania sorafenibu w skojarzeniu z TACE wydaje się najbardziej efektywna, gdyż aktywację czynników wzrostu pod wpływem TACE obserwuje się już w kilka godzin po zastosowaniu tej metody leczenia miejscowego [22].

W badaniu I fazy [23], oceniającym bezpieczeństwo i tolerancję skojarzenia TACE z sorafenibem podawanym w sposób ciągły u pacjentów z HCC w stopniu B wg klasyfikacji BCLC, nie stwierdzono istotnych różnic w częstości i ciężkości obserwowanych działań niepożądanych w porównaniu z wynikami uzyskanymi w badaniach oceniających zastosowanie sorafenibu [20] i TACE [24] jako samodzielnych metod terapeutycznych. Zespół stopa–ręka wystąpił u 21% pacjentów. Biegunkę stwierdzono aż u 50% chorych leczonych, ale odsetek chorych z tym powikłaniem w 3. stopniu toksyczności wynosił 8%. Bóle brzucha były zdecydowanie częstsze przy zastosowaniu leczenia skojarzonego (28%) niż przy podawaniu sorafenibu w monoterapii (8%), co najprawdopodobniej wynikało z tzw. zespołu po embolizacji, będącego bezpośrednim powikłaniem TACE. U 7% pacjentów obserwowano ostre zapalenie pęcherzyka żółciowego związane również z TACE [23]. Małopłytkowość była jedynym działaniem niepożądanym stwierdzanym częściej w skojarzonej terapii w 3 stopniu to-ksyczności i dotyczyła 21 % chorych w porównaniu do 4% pacjentów otrzymujących sorafenib w monoterapii [20]. W badaniu tym [23] poza oceną profilu bezpieczeństwa i toksyczności oznaczano również stężenie krążącego VEGF wykonywane przed rozpoczęciem terapii i 20 godz. po pierwszym zabiegu TACE. Uzyskano znaczące zmniejszenie stężenia krążącego VEGF po zastosowaniu terapii skojarzonej, co potwierdziło teoretyczne przesłanki o możliwości skutecznego zablokowania uwalniania tego czynnika wzrostu w trakcie TACE przez leki molekularnie ukierunkowane [23].

Obecnie prowadzonych jest kilka badań II fazy celem oceny bezpieczeństwa, skuteczności i ustalenia optymalnego schematu postępowania z zastosowaniem sorafenibu w skojarzeniu z TACE. Chung i wsp. na konferencji Amerykańskiego Towarzystwa Onkologii Klinicznej w 2010r. przedstawili wstępne wyniki badania II fazy z zastosowaniem w/w leczenia skojarzonego u pacjentów z nieresekcyjnym HCC [25]. W badaniu tym zastosowano metodę przerywaną podawania sorafenibu w skojarzeniu z TACE. Chorzy rozpoczynali terapię systemową 4 dni po każdym zabiegu TACE, a podawanie sorafenibu przerywano na 4 dni przed kolejnym zabiegiem leczenia miejscowego. Spośród 50 pacjentów poddanych wstępnej analizie, u 18 (36%) stwierdzono całkowitą remisję, 30 chorych (60%) uzyskało częściową remisję lub stabilizację procesu nowotworowego. Progresja choroby dotyczyła 2 pacjentów (4% ocenianych chorych) [25].

W innym wieloośrodkowym badaniu II fazy (SOCRATES trial) [26] również oceniano skuteczność i bezpieczeństwo terapii skojarzonej z zastosowaniem sorafenibu i TACE. W badaniu tym zastosowano inny sposób przerywanego podawania sorafenibu i TACE niż w badaniu Chunga. Terapię sorafenibem włączano 2 tygodnie przez pierwszym zabiegiem TACE, a przerywano ją 3 dni przed kolejnym zabiegiem. Terapię celowaną ponownie rozpoczynano po leczeniu miejscowym, z reguły dzień po ustąpieniu obserwowanych zaburzeń funkcji wątroby. Wstępne wyniki tego badania w postaci abstraktu przedstawiono w tym roku na corocznej konferencji Amerykańskiego Towarzystwa Onkologii Klinicznej w 2011 r. Większość chorych (34 z 45 poddanych analizie) uzyskała stabilizację procesu nowotworowego. U żadnego pacjenta nie obserwowano całkowitej remisji, a u 1 chorego stwierdzono częściową odpowiedź kliniczną. Mediana czasu do progresji (time to progression – TTP) wyniosła 526 dni, a mediana całkowitego przeżycia 562 dni. Duże nadzieje na ustalenie korzyści ze skojarzenia terapii celowanej z zastosowaniem sorafenibu plus TACE u chorych w stopniu zaawansowania pośrednim B wg klasyfikacji BCLC, wiązane są z wynikami prowadzonego wieloośrodkowego randomizowanego badania klinicznego (SPACE Trial) [27]. W badaniu tym zaplanowano randomizację 300 chorych. Sorafenib podawany jest w sposób ciągły, a zabieg TACE wykonywany jest pierwszego dnia cyklu 1., 3., 7. i 13., a następnie ewentualnie co 6 cykli leczenia systemowego.

Wyniki przeprowadzonych dotychczas badań wskazują na korzystne pod względem skuteczności i bezpieczeństwa działanie sorafenibu w skojarzeniu z TACE u chorych z nieoperacyjnym rakiem wątrobowokomórkowy w stadium zaawansowania pośrednim B choroby wg klasyfikacji BCLC. Potwierdza to również przypadek opisany przez nas, gdzie uzyskaliśmy PR, aczkolwiek leczenie stosowaliśmy w sposób sekwencyjny. Dużą nadzieję na zmniejszenie toksyczności oraz poprawę wyników budzi zastosowanie TACE z wykorzystaniem cząstek opłaszczonych doksorubicyną (DEB-TACE). Być może odpowiedź na te zagadnienia przyniosą wyniki badania III fazy ECOG 1208 [28].

Piśmiennictwo

 1. Parkin DM, Bray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002. CA Cancer J Clin 2005; 55: 74-108.  

2. Boyle P, Levin B. World Cancer Report. IARC Press, Lyon 2008.  

3. Bosch FX, Ribes J, Diaz M. Cleries R. Primary liver cancer world-wide incidence and trends. Gastroenterology 2004; 127 (supl. 10): 5-16.  

4. El-Serag HB. Hepatocellular carcinoma: an epidemiologic view. J Clin Gastroenterol 2002; 35 (supl. 1): 72-8.  

5. Sligte K, Bourass I, Sels JP, et al. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: review of growing medical problem. Eur J Intern Med 2004; 15: 10-21.  

6. Neuschwander-Tetri BA. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and the metabolic syndrome. Am J Med Sci 2005; 330: 326-35.  

7. Sant M, Allemani C, Santaquilani M, et al. EUROCARE-4. Survival of cancer patients diagnosed In 1995-1999. Results and commentary. Eur J Cancer 2009; 45: 931-91.  

8. Bruix J, Sherman M. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: an update. Hepatology 2011; 53: 1020-2.  

9. Llovet JM, Bruix J. Novel advancements in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma in 2008. J Heaptol 2008; 48 (supl.1): S20-S37.

10. Sandhu DS, Tharayii VS, Lai JP, Roberts LR. Treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Heaptol 2008; 2: 81-92.

11. Bruix J, Llovet JM. Major achievements in hepatocellular carcinoma. Lancet 2009; 373: 614-6.

12. Camma C, Schepis F, Orlando A et al. Transarterial chemoembolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Radiology 2002; 224: 47-54.

13. Llovet JM, Bruix J. Systematic review of randomized trials for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: Chemoembolization improves survival. Hepatology 2003; 37: 429-42.

14. Bruix J, Sala M, Llovet JM. Chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. Gastroenterology 2004; 127: S179-S188.

15. Li X, Feng GS, Zheng CS, Zhuo CK, Liu X. Influence of transarterial chemoembolization on angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in rat with Walker-256 transplanted hepatoma: An experimental study. World J Gastroenterol 2003; 9: 2445-2449.

16. Sergio A, Cristofori C, Cardin R, et al. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): the role of angiogenesis and invasiveness. Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103: 914-21.

17. Li Z, Hu DY, Chu Q, Wu JH, Gao C, Zhang YQ, Huang YR. Cell apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocellular carcinoma after transarterial chemoembolization. World J Gastroenterol 2004; 10: 1876-80.

18. Llovet JM, Ricci S, Mazzaferro V, et al. Sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. N Engl J Med 2008; 359: 378-90.

19. Cheng AL, Kang YK, Chen Z, et al. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients in the Asia-Pacific region with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase III randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Oncol 2009; 10: 25-34.

20. Keating GM, Santoro A. Sorafenib. A review of its use in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Drugs 2009; 69: 223-40.

21. Abou-Alfa GK, Johnson P, Knox J, et al. Preliminary results from a Pha-se II, randomized, double-blind study of sorafenib plus doxorubicin versus placebo plus doxorubicin in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Presented at: ECCO 14-European Cancer Conference. Barcelona, Spain, 23-27 September 2007.

22. Strebel BM, Dufour JF. Combined approach to hepatocellular carcinoma: A new treatment concept for nonresectable disease. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2008; 8: 1743-9.

23. Dufour JF, Hoppe H, Heim MH, et al. Continuous administration of sorafenib in combination with transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: results of a phase I study. Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103: 914-21.

24. Marelli L, Stigliano R, Triantos C, et al. Transarterial therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: Which technique is more effective? A systematic review of cohort and randomized studies. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 2007; 30: 6-25.

25. Chung Y, Kim B, Chen C, et al. Study in Asia of the combination of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma trial (START): second interim safety and efficacy analysis. J Clin Oncol 2010; 28[15S]: 4026.

26. Erhardt A, Kolligs FT, Dollinger MM, et al. TACE plus sorafenib for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: Final results of the multicenter SOCRATES trial. Presented at 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting. Abstract 4107 General.

27. Lencioni R, Zou J, Leberre M. Sorafenib (SOR) or placebo (PL) in combination with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (SPACE). J Clin Oncol 2010; 28: 15s.

28. Uller W, Wiggermann P, Gössmann H, Klebl F, Salzberger B, Stroszczynski C, Jung EM. Chemoembolization with epirubicin drug-eluting beads (DEB-TACE) to treat early and intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma. J Clin Oncol 2010; 28: 15s (abstract 4141).

Adres do korespondencji

Joanna Omyła-Staszewska

Klinika Onkologii i Hematologii

Centralny Szpital Kliniczny MSWiA

ul. Wołoska 137

02-507 Warszawa

e-mail: joannaomyla@gmail.com



Praca wpłynęła 19.09.2011

Zaakceptowano do druku : 22.12.2011
Copyright: © 2012 Termedia Sp. z o. o. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
Quick links
© 2019 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe