eISSN: 2299-0046
ISSN: 1642-395X
Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postępy Dermatologii i Alergologii
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Reviewers Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
3/2022
vol. 39
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Letter to the Editor

Identifying drug allergies by means of exposure testing – the frequency and nature of hypersensitivity reactions

Tobias Welponer
1
,
Matthias Brandlmaier
1
,
Bernd Feuerstein
2
,
Johann Wolfgang Bauer
1

1.
Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Hospital of the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Austria
2.
Department of Dermatology, Landeskrankenhaus Feldkirch, Austria
Adv Dermatol Allergol 2022; XXXIX (3): 632-634
Online publish date: 2021/11/01
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
Drug hypersensitivity reactions are dose-independent, unpredictable, and immune-mediated type B adverse drug reactions (ADR) in patients sensitized to a certain drug [1]. The first signs appear within minutes to hours of drug intake, ranging from low-grade to possibly life-threatening anaphylactic symptoms; they can also appear several hours to days later in the form of exanthema [2]. An allergic reaction should be substantiated within 4 weeks to 6 months after the reaction, aiming to identify the trigger and assess the risk for subsequent reactions [3].

Clinical classification, based on the morphology and timing of the reaction, is necessary for correct diagnosis. In the case of distinct symptoms of hypersensitivity and unambiguous findings of validated skin (in vivo) and/or laboratory tests (in vitro), the assignment to a trigger may be considered sufficient [4]. However, skin and laboratory tests lack high sensitivity and frequently show false negative or non-significant results [5].
Quick links
© 2022 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.