eISSN: 2299-0054
ISSN: 1895-4588
Videosurgery and Other Miniinvasive Techniques
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2/2019
vol. 14
 
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Spine surgery
abstract:
Original paper

Minimally invasive spine surgery in the treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis: an initial retrospective series study

Shuo Yuan
,
Fengyu Ma
,
Yexin Wang
,
Pihao Gong

Videosurgery Miniinv 2019; 14 (2): 333–339
Online publish date: 2018/10/11
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Introduction
Pyogenic spondylodiscitis is a bacterial infection affecting the intervertebral disc and its adjacent vertebrae. Although relatively rare, it is a challenging medical disease with a poor prognosis that requires immediate diagnosis and treatment with suitable antibiotics.

Aim
To evaluate the clinical outcome of minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) for pyogenic spondylodiscitis.

Material and methods
The retrospective study cohort consisted of 10 consecutive patients who had undergone MIS decompression and/or discectomy for thoracic or lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis in our hospital. Data including patient characteristics, symptoms, visual analog scale (VAS) score, surgical approach and postoperative outcomes were obtained for retrospective analysis.

Results
Between January 2005 and December 2013, 10 patients underwent MIS decompression in the Department of Orthopedics in our medical university. Seven of these patients had lumbar infections and 3 had thoracic infections. All 10 patients had improved VAS scores immediately after surgery and after discharge. The VAS score (respectively on postoperative day 1 and day 7) suggested that the patients in this study had significantly less pain than preoperatively (day 1: 5 vs. 9, p < 0.001; day 7: 2.9 vs. 9, p < 0.001). The organism was obtained in 10 (100%) patients by the operative cultures. All patients achieved an excellent clinical recovery without the need for further spine surgery. All patients underwent postoperative imaging during follow-up and showed complete resolution or dramatically improved magnetic resonance imaging changes.

Conclusions
Minimally invasive spine surgery is a safe and effective surgical approach for pyogenic spondylodiscitis.

keywords:

minimally invasive spine surgery, pyogenic spondylodiscitis, spinal infection

  
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