eISSN: 1689-3530
ISSN: 0867-4361
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction/Alkoholizm i Narkomania
Current issue Archive Articles in press About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
1/2020
vol. 33
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Review article

Mobile applications used to limit alcohol consumption – a literature review

Łukasz Wieczorek
1
,
Justyna Iwona Klingemann
1

1.
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Studies on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Warsaw, Poland
Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33 (1): 43-64
Online publish date: 2020/06/09
Article file
- AIN-Wieczorek.pdf  [0.44 MB]
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

Research results indicate that mobile applications are an increasingly accepted and useful form of improving health intervention [1]. However, their use is not evenly distributed around the world and among different groups of potential users. In the Fox and Duggan study [2], only 19% of smartphone users had downloaded a health app, of which only 10% were over 65 years old. In Poland, almost every third Polish internet user (31%) took advantage of mobile health and sports apps [3] in 2015.

Researchers note [4, 5] that while alcohol dependence is commonly treated as a chronic disease, addiction treatment rarely offers any form of long-term support and relapse prevention in patients who have completed treatment. The answer to these needs may be mobile applications that support overcoming addiction. Apps are one of the ways to expand the therapeutic offer and therapeutic intervention out-reach to people who for various reasons (such as limited availability of treatment, time and financial barriers, stigma or lack of childcare facilities) do not seek therapeutic help despite their experienced problems [6, 7].

According to the data collected in the review paper by Cohn et al. [8], 71% of the apps on the subject of alcohol encourage its use. These can be divided into five categories. The first of which includes entertainment applications, like e.g. alcohol-related games, motor coordination tests and “breathalysers”(users are encouraged to blow into the phone). The next category is instructions for making drinks. The third covers apps that help you buy alcohol at the nearest shop or bar. In the next category there were apps with an informative function, presenting different types of alcohol. The last category includes organisational apps that allow you to create catalogues of your favourite wines, beers and shopping sites. The remaining apps (29%) can be treated as discouraging to alcohol use and can be categorised into three types. The first includes apps related to counselling and motivation, with functionalities like psychoeducation and feedback, for example on the amount of money saved by stopping drinking or the number of calories in different drinks. The second area includes support apps, helpful in maintaining abstinence and exercising self-control, with functionalities like blood alcohol content (BAC) estimations, counting sober days, relaxation exercises and information on harm reduction. The third area includes applications dedicated to social support, containing information about Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, internet forums etc.

The aim of this article is to identify telephone applications for reducing alcohol consumption and determine their effectiveness.

Material and methods

The search for articles for review took place in September 2018. The two article databases used were Web of Science (WoS) and EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO). The scope of the article search was from 2010 to 2018, so only the latest scientific reports are analysed.
A set of keywords entered simultaneously in the search fields was used.
Field No. 1: cell phone OR cellural phone OR mobile phone OR smartphone OR mobile health OR mHealth OR apps OR application OR automated recovery support
AND
Field No 2: aftercare OR relapse prevention OR recovery OR continuing care OR treatment outcomes
AND
Field No 3: alcoholism OR addiction OR alcohol dependence OR alcohol OR alcohol use disorder OR AUD Web of Science database search results A total of 1036 indications were obtained, which were subsequently reduced by using restrictive criteria. Publications in Polish and English only were selected, which provided 1004 indications. Then document type was narrowed to an article, review, book, chapter in a book with 974 indications were obtained. The next step was to select the areas covered by the articles. These were identified as substance abuse, psychology, psychiatry, health care sciences services, social work, behavioural sciences, social sciences other topics, social issues and sociology, which provided 270 articles. After reading the abstracts, the 32 articles meeting the objectives of the review were selected (Figure 1).

EBSCO Publishing database search results
There were 2419 indications, which were then limited by restrictive criteria. The first selection stage was the occurrence of searched keywords in the abstract after which 805 articles remained. Then only publications in Polish and English were selected giving 778 indications.

In the next step thesaurus was used, in which the selected categories were alcohol (15 articles), substance abuse treatment (15), disease relapse (12), treatment of alcoholism (12), alcoholism (9), mobile apps (9), substance abuse (9), descriptive statistics (8), prevention (8), randomised controlled trials (8), smartphones (8), telemedicine (8), treatment effectiveness (8), clinical trials (7), health outcome assessment (7), research methodology (7), social support (7), alcohol drinking (6), compulsive behaviour (6), wireless communication systems (6), economic development (1), industrial psychology (1), open source software (1), risk assessment (1) and working hours (1). The articles could be assigned to several categories. This limitation resulted in 79 articles. The EBSCO Publishing search engine removed two duplicates. After reading the abstracts of 77 publications, the articles not meeting the review criteria were excluded. Finally, 12 articles were selected for review (Figure 2).

The next step was to eliminate duplicate searches in WoS and EBSCO databases and to obtain full texts of selected publications (from the full text databases or through direct contact with the authors of publications). As a result, 33 full article texts were obtained and their contents were analysed.

Results

The literature review identified a number of interventions supposed to support the reduction of alcohol use. These can be divided into three categories: 1) telephone apps, 2) websites and 3) SMS text message interventions. mHealth-type interventions to help reduce drinking and their effectiveness

Telephone applications
On the basis of the literature review, 10 different telephone applications were identified to reduce alcohol use. Research on the effectiveness of apps was generally conducted with the participation of experimental and control groups. In the experimental group standard interactions (treatment as usual, TAU) and interactions with the use of apps were used, whereas in the control group the participants underwent only standard treatment. All apps are available in English, except SIDEAL, which is in Spanish, and Alcohol Cue Exposure App, which is in Danish. Only two apps – SIDEAL and Ray’s Night Out were available in the online shop free of charge. The remaining apps have not yet been transferred to the public domain.

The most widely described app is Addiction: a Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (A-CHESS) designed at the University of Wisconsin (USA). The A-CHESS application is based on self-determination theory (SDT), which assumes that satisfying the need for autonomy (man as the cause of events), the need for competence (coping skills) and the need for relationships (interaction with other people, social support) ensures optimal development [9, 10]. The A-CHESS app contains functionalities corresponding to various relapse risk factors and includes both specific strategies (identification of high-risk situations, coping with relapses) and more general strategies (promoting a sustainable lifestyle, encouraging positive and rewarding activities) [11].

The studies using A-CHESS app confirmed its effectiveness [12]. In the study participants who used the application, it was found that the number of days of drinking alcohol at each measurement point in the 4th, 8th and 12th month was reduced, which resulted in more frequent maintenance of abstinence. The use of the A-CHESS application also effectively prevents drinking relapses. In the study by Scott et al. [13], only 2.7% of respondents using A-CHESS reported drinking alcohol. Yoo et al. [14] analysed, in turn, the impact of emotional support that A-CHESS users could provide or receive by participating in online support groups. The results of the study show that this type of support is beneficial for the app users, but the value of providing and receiving emotional support within social groups decreases with time.

The Location-Based Monitoring and Intervention for Alcohol Use Disorders (LBMI-A) application was developed using theoretical models embedded in behavioural sciences and communication theory, CRA (community reinforcement approach) and SDT (self-determination theory) [7, 15]. The application contains seven psycho-educational modules: 1) monitoring of alcohol use and feedback; 2) places where there is a risk of drinking; 3) important persons from whom support can be obtained; 4) alcohol craving and coping with it; 5) problem-solving skills; 6) communication and refusal skills; 7) enjoyable non-drinking activities. The LBMI-A app has proved to be an effective tool to support treatment. Its users were more likely to maintain abstinence during the 6 weeks of the study than those in the control group. The use of the app also contributed to reducing the number of days of heavy drinking and the number of days of drinking per week. The researchers observed that in the weeks in which the respondents used the application more often, a lower number of days of heavy drinking and a lower number of days of drinking per week could be observed [16]. The Alcohol Cue Exposure App is based on a scientific approach to the issue of alcoholic beverage exposure reaction (cue exposure therapy). It uses films that present drinking in an attractive way. The application consists of four modules: 1) introductions; 2) four sessions on how to cope with the alcohol craving; 3) eight videos which present drinking in an attractive way and at the same time show how to use alcohol craving coping strategies and 4) progress evaluation. The intensity of craving is measured before, during and after the film.

The application was at the testing stage, so performance data were not available [17].
The Daybreak app has been developed based on an online intervention conducted on Hello Sunday Morning, an Australian public health community platform. Users of the platform set their goal as to reduce alcohol consumption or total abstinence and share their reflections on a public blog. The Daybreak app helps to achieve these goals thanks to the support of the Hello Sunday Morning community, chats with a coach on healthy lifestyles and various types of exercises that influence behaviour change. Also, this app has only just been tested, so data on its effectiveness was not available [18].

The HealthCall app is based on 2 components. The first is monitoring functioning and the second is personalised feedback. As part of monitoring, the user fills in a short questionnaire (2-4 minutes) every day on alcohol and drug use and other behaviours. After completing the questionnaire, users receive a text message to maintain their motivation to change their behaviour. Within the second component of the app, after 30 and 60 days of use, personalised feedback is provided in the form of a graph of alcohol consumption and a summary of the other data entered by the user within the first component. This provides a basis for an interview with a specialist to identify drug-use patterns and look for ways to change these and reduce substance use. The HealthCall application has proved to be an effective help to reduce the use of psychoactive substances. People who have received standard treatment and support from the application have reduced their alcohol and drug use much more than those who have only received standard treatment. For alcohol, the group using the app drank on average 33% less than the control group (IRR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.41-1.07). The same was true for the number of standard drinks consumed during one day of drinking. The app users drank 37% less drinks than the control group (IRR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.36-1.11) [19]. The SEVA app was developed for use in primary healthcare. It is intended for the education and social reintegration of dependent persons. Treatment is based primarily on the therapeutic education system and 65 interactive multimedia modules. They are aimed at developing three types of skills: 1) cognitive-behavioural skills (e.g. refusing to use a substance, changing beliefs about it), 2) skills supporting change of one’s own life (e.g. an increase in the activity), 3) skills related to the prevention of HIV, HCV and other sexually transmitted diseases. Each of the 65 modules ends with a quiz to verify the acquired knowledge and skills. The social reintegration component was developed on the basis of A-CHESS application.

Users of the SEVA app showed significant improvement after 6 months of exploiting it. During this time they reduced the number of days of risky drinking (44% decrease, p = 0.04, effect size = –0.199) and drug use (34% decrease, p = 0.01, effect size = –0.248). An improvement was also observed on the scale evaluating the overall quality of life and the quality of physical and mental functioning. The number of hospitalisations and visits to the emergency room decreased and the frequency of doing HIV tests increased [20, 21]. Motivational dialogue is the theoretical basis of the SIDEAL app. It is available free of charge and only in Spanish. It can be downloaded and used without registering. However, without registration, the number of functions is limited to establishing the purpose of the treatment, monitoring alcohol consumption and presented it in visual form with assigned accepted limits as well as gaining access to psychoeducation and to the helpline. In order to extend the range of functionalities, a user account must be created and settings configured for the individual recipient. It is then necessary to contact a professionalist (therapist). Users who have used the application under the professional supervision had access to therapy goals updated by the specialist and received recommendations on the necessary effects, were also able to record and monitor adherence to the therapy recommendations. They received personalised feedback and text messages containing therapy advice once a week. The messages were randomly selected from a pool of 50 messages prepared by a panel of experts. The application was in the testing phase, therefore data concerning its effectiveness were not available [22].

You et al. [23] used the SoberDiary app together with a breathalyzer connected to the phone via Bluetooth to monitor drinking behaviour among dependent persons. The breathalyser measured the level of alcohol in the exhaled air and transmitted the data directly to the application. During the 5-second exhalation process, the user has to look into the phone’s built-in front camera to confirm their identity. Users of the app reduced alcohol consumption and prolonged abstinence periods. The subjective sense of quality of life was rated higher than during the first measurement prior to the app being used. Two of the apps the authors reviewed were tested among young people – Ray’s Night Out and TeleCoach. Ray’s Night Out is a game app in which a red panda avatar called Ray is the main character. The user can take the panda to a crazy party or give it a quiet evening. The goals of the app are to provide information about the effects of drinking alcohol, motivate to change behaviour and learn new social skills. The user sort of impersonates the panda, sets a drinking limit for it and the panda tries to stay within this limit. He/she can buy alcoholic beverages for the panda and has a preview of the number of drinks purchased, which allows monitoring of drinking. The user should take care of Ray as the application itself motivates him to do so. If he successfully completes this task, he receives points called good vibes, which unlock various prizes (photo booth rewards). Points can be earned for Ray’s use of protective strategies, such as giving him a non-alcoholic beverages, eating, engaging him in various activities such as dancing, relaxing or flirting. Information about these strategies and the effects of alcohol intoxication is provided by means of interactive messages like “Are you sure? I am quite drunk”. Users also gain knowledge about the effects of alcohol use by visualising Ray’s behaviour; e.g. the inability to maintain balance, low energy levels. If Ray exceeds the user’s set drinking limit, he starts vomiting and fainting. All this is to show the positive effects of sticking to the drinking plan and the negative consequences of exceeding the established limit.

Research on the effectiveness of Ray’s Night Out was conducted among young people aged 16-25 years. The results showed that within a month of using the application, knowledge about alcohol and the harm it causes to the body has increased. Comparing the results of measurements taken at the start of the application and after one month of use, a small change in the amount of alcohol consumed was detected. On the basis of subsequent measurements taken in the 2nd, 3rd and 6th month of use, it was found that drinking continued to be at the same level. No differences were also observed in drinking alcohol in a risky way during one occasion of drinking. The percentage of participants who did not experience problems resulting from alcohol consumption increased from 25% to 48% after 6 months of application use. However, no improvement was noted among those who experienced alcohol-related problems. The use of the application did not reduce drinking in their case. The Ray’s Night Out app. was positively evaluated by its users. It had a youth-friendly appearance and provided knowledge about alcohol in an accessible manner [24].

TeleCoach is an application consisting of two main components as monitoring of last week’s alcohol consumption and a relapse prevention module offering two strategies – “saying no” and “feeling better without alcohol”. The refusal strategy includes two options: learning risk analysis and training to refuse alcohol drinking. The risk analysis of alcohol use consists of answering the questions in the Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale (AASE) and feedback on the risk situation. Alcohol refusal training is presented in text form. The strategy of feeling better without alcohol allows you to choose recordings of relaxation exercises and concerning positive thinking and recordings of participation in the training to cope with alcohol craving. The app was tested among Swedish university students who had been abusing alcohol. The results of the study showed that the use of the application to reduce drinking brought the desired results. The frequency of drinking and the amount of alcohol consumed decreased if one compares the initial measurement and the one carried out after 6 weeks of using the application. Larger decreases were observed in the experimental group than in the control group. However, according to the researchers, the change in the drinking pattern could have been influenced by an e-mail about risky alcohol use received by respondents in the experimental group. People from the control group did not receive an e-mail of this kind [25]. Internet sites

InTheRooms.com is a website designed for people psychoactive substance dependent undergoing recovery. Access to the service is free of charge around the clock. The website offers 118 real-time meetings, 67% of which are based on the 12 Steps approach of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. The rest of the meetings (33%) are related to other disorders. In addition, the website provides recorded testimony of people who have overcome addiction, and discussion forums where users can share their experiences, comment on each others’ experiences and interact with each other. Website users may receive reminders about meditations aimed at strengthening reflection on changing their own behaviour.

Registered users have access to a search engine of real-life meetings they can attend. Respondents spent on average 30 minutes per day several times a week on the site. The most popular were the meditations and real time online meetings. The abstinence length did not affect the perception of the site benefits. Those who remained in abstinence for less than a year and those who maintained abstinence for longer were of the opinion that using the website functionalities improves motivation to change their addictive behaviour and supports maintenance of abstinence. In the opinion of about 70% of respondents, the use of the website allows coping with the cravings and strengthens problem identification [26].

Overcoming Addiction is another website-based intervention. It is supposed support abstinence and strengthen the motivation to change addictive behaviour. It contains four separate modules that deal with alcohol, marijuana, stimulants and opioids. Each of them includes interactive exercises based on the SMART therapy programme (Self-Management and Recovery Training). Like the SMART programme, the website’s impact is also about strengthening motivation to change, coping with cravings, learning to deal with problems without using psychoactive substances and shaping a positive, sustainable and healthy lifestyle. The service allows for monitoring the occurrence of alcohol craving, setting goals and changing them and provides mindfulness exercises aimed at preventing the relapses.

The use of Overcoming Addiction intervention has contributed to an increase in the number of abstinence days (from 44% in the first measurement to 72% in the second, p < 0.001), reduction in the average number of drinks drunk on one occasion (from 8.0 to 4.6, p < 0.001) and the number of problems resulting from alcohol and other psychoactive substance use (p < 0.001) [27, 28].

Interventions using text messages
Text messages are used as a type of intervention aimed at reducing psychoactive substance use. Studies report that they are an attractive form supporting return to health [29].

The studies by Lucht et al. [30] have used text messages to change the alcohol use related behaviour by people who have been treated at a detoxification unit. Text messages were sent twice a week with in total 16 text messages were sent over 8 weeks. The message was personalised and sounded as follows “Sir/Madam, have you been drinking alcohol or need help? Please answer A if yes or B if no.” The message monitoring system categorised the messages according to the response and the time at which it was sent, making it possible to select those most in need. The system, having received response A within 24 hours, sent an e-mail to the therapist asking them to contact the patient. A SMS with motivational content was sent to those who sent back answer B. It was randomly selected by the system from among 40 messages like “Good work!”, “Do not be afraid to contact us if necessary!”. Messages with content other than A or B were classified as unusual and sent by e-mail to therapists who evaluated them and decided whether the sender needed help. If the patient did not respond within 24 hours, the system also sent an e-mail to the therapist to contact the patient. Text message intervention has proved effective. People who received text messages were more likely to use alcohol in a safe way in comparison with respondents from the control group (TAU – treatment as usual) at 55.7% and 40% of respondents respectively (risk difference: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.06-0.37; β = –0.799, p = 0.122). There were no differences between the experimental and control groups in the average number of days of drinking, the number of drinks consumed during a typical day of drinking and the number of days of risky drinking with more than six standard doses of alcohol consumed. The effectiveness of SMS support is higher for those who drink less. For people who drink alcohol in large quantities, this kind of support may not be sufficient. Only 20% of messages sent from patients required therapeutic intervention. Two consultants were able to support 42 people, one made on average less than two calls a day [30].

Gonzales et al. [31] analysed the impact of text messages on the functioning of psychoactive substance-dependent people aged 12 to 24 years of age who had completed treatment. The respondents were sent three types of messages: 1) with a request to monitor drinking and functioning, 2) with indications for improvement of health condition and 3) education concerning the use of substances and information on sources of help in difficult situations. The messages on monitoring drinking and functioning referred to situations and behaviours that may cause a relapse: among others low self-confidence, stress, bad mood and lack of involvement in activities aimed at maintaining abstinence. The messages were sent every afternoon. If the respondent answered the message, the system generated a motivational automatic response providing instructions on how to deal with difficult situations. The pool of feedback messages was large at 600, so that none could be repeated during the 12-week intervention. Two notifications were sent to non-replying users: first in the evening of the same day and the second by noon the following day. The guidance messages, intended to improve health, were sent every day at noon. They concerned the change of addictive behaviour, improvement of functioning, e.g. “Today is another day of your recovery, think about the change you are working on”. Educational messages about substance use and information about sources of help in difficult situations were sent at weekends. The educational texts discussed the consequences of a given substance use. Information about sources of help in difficult situations concerned institutions providing assistance in the respondent’s place of residence.

Adolescents who received SMS messages were less likely to return to the drinking pattern represented prior to treatment compared to the control group (OR = 0.52, p = 0.002). Individuals from the experimental group reported significantly fewer problems resulting from substance use (β = –0.46, p = 0.03) and were more likely to participate in treatment-related additional activities (β = 1.63, p = 0.03) compared to the control group [31]. The effectiveness of text messages was also tested in the group of students. SMS intervention was conducted for 6 weeks, using a total of 62 messages. These were supposed to motivate to reduce alcohol use, increase self-control and self-efficacy and raise awareness that social support can be obtained, including professionals. During the first 4 weeks of intervention, text messages were sent more often at nine per week, with the number decreasing over time. The intervention receivers were asked to send a feedback message about the number of drinks they had consumed in the previous week. They received another text message in response with feedback on the achievement of the objectives that is whether their drinking was within the limit set at the beginning of the intervention. Reporting on the number of drinks and receiving feedback took place once a week on Sunday. In this study, no statistically significant differences between the experimental group and the control group with standard intervention were noted [32].

Methodological limitations of research
The authors of the literature reviews indicate methodological limitations of the published studies on using mHealth interventions. Lui et al. [33] note that for none of the 21 publications reviewed the effectiveness of the applications verified by repeat testing on a similar audience. This is a significant limitation as without independent replication studies, it is difficult to say the effectiveness of telephone applications in the area of mental health has been sufficiently documented [33].

The problem is also that the technological progress in the area of mHealth is extremely fast. By the time results demonstrating the effectiveness of a specific application are confirmed by several sources and are published for review, the technology may already be outdated [15]. Moreover, the applications are extremely ephemeral; in the case of the Ramsey review [7], 35% of the applications described were no longer available at the time the review was completed.

Studies conducted by Quanbeck et al. [21] on the implementation of SEVA application at the primary healthcare level have shown that after the completion of the intervention and the discontinuation of subscriptions application use was less intensive. This may mean that the free of charge phone received by the respondents and the subscription paid under the project had an impact on the intensity of application use. Similar observations are made by Andersson [34], who emphasises that it may be beneficial for the participants of the intervention to receive the phone, which affects the perception of the intervention. Thus, the motivation to participate in the study may be to receive a phone free of charge rather than to improve social functioning or change addictive behaviour.

The intensity of app use may also be influenced by experience in phone use. Those who have not had a smartphone before may use the application more often than people who have experience with devices of this kind, which may translate into an assessment of application effectiveness. The effectiveness may be influenced by contacts with researchers caused by phone failure – respondents can treated these contacts as support that encourage further recovery [34].

Discussion

The aim of this literature review was to identify telephone applications that reduce drinking, to present how they work and to determine their effectiveness. The review showed that over a period of 8 years, 10 different telephone applications aimed at reducing alcohol use were described in scientific journals, as well as two internet websites where dependent persons could find support. During this time, research was also conducted using text messages as a form of intervention to reduce drinking. The research that has been included in this review has shown that mHealth interventions can be an effective form of support in dependence therapy and significantly contribute to increasing the number of days of abstinence and improving social functioning. It is possible to identify number of benefits resulting from the use of mHealth to reduce alcohol use and improve social functioning. Telephone applications and other similar interventions broaden the available treatment offer for dependent persons and improve the effectiveness of therapy [22]. They make drinking less risky [34]. The applications contribute to greater acceptance for maintaining abstinence and improve communication between the patient and the professional. Furthermore, the use of applications in the therapy of dependent persons may contribute to strengthening the bonds between the patient and institutions providing assistance to this group of recipients. This can be beneficial for people who end up in inpatient therapy facilities and undertake treatment in outpatient clinics. The use of support in the form of an application, e.g. A-CHESS, made its users record fewer alcohol drinking days, which resulted in more frequent non interruption of outpatient treatment [35]. Even when the effects of the application are not spectacular, its use brings benefits as the treatment costs resulting from the use of alcohol are lower [22, 34]. The measurable economic benefits of mHealth interventions result from the reduction in the number of consultation contacts with therapists. This is particularly important in countries, where individual consultations are abandoned in favour of group support and therapy time is reduced. The use of the app may be an attractive form of support for dependent persons [17, 36]. According to the study by Gustafson et al. [12], the cost of using the A-CHESS app for one patient was 597 US dollars within 8 months, including the cost of a counsellor, system administrator, plan setting for each user and phones. In the case of the SEVA app implemented at the primary healthcare level, the cost of support for one patient for 12 months was estimated at 1400 US dollars [21]. However, the costs of interventions carried out in the form of telephone apps will continue to decrease, as the prices of electronic devices and software are decreasing [12].

Telephone apps can be used anywhere and anytime as convenient in the users’ daily schedule. For patients for whom access to facilities is difficult due to geographical barriers, professional or family duties, or for those who would never be available for treatment due to various barriers, the use of mHealth interventions can be a good alternative. The development of telephone apps and other types of new technologies allows reaching a larger audience and sustain the effects of treatment even after its completion in the institution [36]. An important variable related to the use of the app is the possibility of remaining anonymous. The fear of the loss of anonymity is one of the barriers to treatment encountered by the alcohol-dependent persons [37]. Some applications also contain a social component like forums and chats. The involvement in the community allows for the exchange of experiences, advice and creation of support networks that can help overcoming dependence [5, 12].

Promising results have been achieved by using text messages. The use of SMS has a number of advantages as they are brief and can be read immediately upon receipt so there are few barriers to reaching the target reader. Thanks to text messages it is possible to reach a large population that has mobile phones. Interventions with the use of SMS are also low-cost [30, 32].

The mHealth-type interventions also has its limitations. People with cognitive limitations may find it difficult to use apps to support treatment. The use of smartphone and apps seems too complicated for them and thus would not bring positive results [22]. The use of the app itself without personal contact with the therapist may also reduce the treatment effectiveness [17]. Studies show that commitment to using the treatment supporting application decreases with the reduction of alcohol use. Users may assume that since they have cut down on drinking, they may also reduce the use of the app, which carries the risk of relapse [16].

Conclusions

mHealth interventions are increasingly used as a form of support in the treatment of alcohol dependence. Applications installed on a mobile phone are most often used for this purpose, but text messaging interventions are also quite popular.

The results of the research show that mHealth interventions are an effective form of support towards changing addictive behaviour. However, their effectiveness decreases if personal contacts with the therapist are not maintained. The use of applications in the young people’s group does not bring as spectacular results as in the group of adults, which indicates the need to deepen the analyses in this area and identify the causes of decreased effectiveness.

Conflict of interest

None declared.

Financial support

The project “Use of new technologies in the process of recovering from addiction (mWSPARCIE 2018-2020)” is financed by the State Agency for the Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems as part of the implementation of the National Health Programme 2016-2020 (agreement 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Ethics

The work described in this article has been carried out in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) on medical research involving human subjects, Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals and the ethical principles defined in the Farmington Consensus of 1997.

References

1. Payne HE, Lister C, West JH, Bernhardt JM. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015; 3(1). DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.3335.
2. Fox S, Duggan M. Tracking for Health. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. Washingon, DC: PewResearchCenter; 2013.
3. Zadarko-Domaradzka M, Zadarko E. Aplikacje zdrowotne na urządzenia mobilne w edukacji zdrowotnej społeczeństwa. Edukacja – Technika – Informatyka 2016; 7(4): 291-93. DOI: 10.15584/eti.2016.4.37.
4. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
5. Gustafson DH, Boyle MG, Shaw BR, Isham A, McTavish F, Richards S, et al. An E-Health Solution for People With Alcohol Problems. Alcohol Res Health 2011; 33(4): 327-37.
6. Hoeppner BB, Schick MR, Kelly LM, Hoeppner SS, Bergman B, Kelly JF. There is an app for that – Or is there? A content analysis of publicly available smartphone apps for managing alcohol use. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 82: 67-73. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.09.006.
7. Ramsey A. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80. DOI: 10.1007/s11469-015-9551-4.
8. Cohn AM, Hunter-Reel D, Hagman BT, Mitchell J. Promoting behavior change from alcohol use through mobile technology: the future of ecological momentary assessment. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2011; 35(12): 2209-15. DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01571.x.
9. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an Evidence-Based, Theoretically Informed, Mobile Technology-Based System to Improve Outcomes for People in Recovery for Alcohol Dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111. DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2011.521413.
10. Gustafson DH, Landucci G, McTavish F, Kornfield R, Johndon RA, Mare M-L, et al. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial. Trials 2016; 17: 592. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-016-1726-1.
11. McTavish FM, Chih MY, Shah D, Gustafson DH. How Patients Recovering From Alcoholism Use a Smartphone Intervention. J Dual Diagn 2012; 8(4): 294-304.
12. Gustafson DH, McTavish FM, Chih M-Y, Atwood AK, Johnson RA, Boyle MG, et al. A smartphone application to support recovery from alcoholism: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry 2014; 71(5): 566-72. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4642.
13. Scott CK, Dennis ML, Gustafson DH. Using ecological momentary assessments to predict relapse after adult substance use treatment. Addict Behav 2018; 82: 72-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.02.025.
14. Yoo W, Shah DV, Chih M-Y, Gustafson DH. Predicting changes in giving and receiving emotional support within a smartphone-based alcoholism support group. Computers in Human Behavior 2018; 78: 261-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.10.006.
15. Quanbeck AR, Gustafson DH, Marsch LA, Mc Tavish F, Brown RT, Mares ML, et al. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study. Implement Sci 2014; 9: 65. DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-9-65.
16. Gonzalez VM, Dulin PL. Comparison of a smartphone app for alcohol use disorders with an Internet-based intervention plus bibliotherapy: A pilot study. J Consult Clin Psychol 2015; 83(2): 335-45. DOI: 10.1037/a0038620.
17. Mellentin AI, Stenager E, Nielsen B, Nielsen AS, Yu F. A Smarter Pathway for Delivering Cue Exposure Therapy? The Design and Development of a Smartphone App Targeting Alcohol Use Disorder. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2017; 5(1): e5. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.6500.
18. Tait RJ, Kirkman JJL, Schaub MP. A Participatory Health Promotion Mobile App Addressing Alcohol Use Problems (The Daybreak Program): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Res Protoc 2018; 7(5): e148. DOI: 10.2196/resprot.9982.
19. Aharonovich E, Stohl M, Cannizzaro D, Hasin D. HealthCall delivered via smartphone to reduce co-occurring drug and alcohol use in HIV-infected adults: A randomized pilot trial. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 83: 15-26. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.09.013.
20. Quanbeck A, Chih MY, Isham A, Gustafson D. Mobile Delivery of Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorders: A Review of the Literature. Alcohol Res 2014; 36(1): 111-22.
21. Quanbeck A, Gustafson DH, Marsch LA, Chih MY, Kornfield R, Mc Tavish F, et al. Implementing a Mobile Health System to Integrate the Treatment of Addiction Into Primary Care: A Hybrid Implementation-Effectiveness Study. J Med Internet Res 2018; 20(1): e37. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.8928.
22. Barrio P, Ortega L, Bona X, Gual A. Development, Validation, and Implementation of an Innovative Mobile App for Alcohol Dependence Management: Protocol for the SIDEAL Trial. JMIR Res Protoc 2016; 5(1): e27. DOI: 10.2196/resprot.5002.
23. You C-W, Chen Y-C, Chen C-H, Lee C-H, Kuo P-H, Huang M-C, et al. Smartphone-based support system (SoberDiary) coupled with a Bluetooth breathalyser for treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients. Addict Behav 2017; 65: 174-78. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.10.017.
24. Hides L, Quinn C, Cockshaw W, Stoyanov SR, Zelenko O, Johnson D, et al. Efficacy and outcomes of a mobile app targeting alcohol use in young people. Addict Behav 2018; 77: 89-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.09.020.
25. Gajecki M, Andersson C, Rosendahl I, Sinadinovic K, Fredriksson M, Berman AH. Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Int J Behav Med 2017; 24(5): 778-88. DOI: 10.1007/s12529-016-9629-9.
26. Bergman BG, Kelly NW, Hoeppner BB, Vilsaint CL, Kelly JF. Digital recovery management: Characterizing recovery-specific social network site participation and perceived benefit. Psychol Addict Behav 2017; 31(4): 506-12. DOI: 10.1037/adb0000255.
27. Hester RK, Lenberg KL, Campbell W, Delaney HD. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-based application, and SMART Recovery, an online and in-person mutual help group for problem drinkers, part 1: three-month outcomes of a randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res 2013; 15(7): e134. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.2565.
28. Campbell W, Hester RK, Lenberg KL, Delaney HD. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 2: Six-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Feedback From Participants. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2016; 18(10): e262. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.5508.
29. Muench F, Weiss RA, Kuerbis A, Morgenstern J. Developing a theory driven text messaging intervention for addiction care with user driven content. Psychol Addict Behav 2013; 27(1): 315-21. DOI: 10.1037/a0029963.
30. Lucht MJ, Hoffman L, Haug S, Meyer C, Pussehl D, Quellmalz A, et al. A surveillance tool using mobile phone short message service to reduce alcohol consumption among alcohol-dependent patients. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2014; 38(6): 1728-36. DOI: 10.1111/acer.12403.
31. Gonzales R, Ang A, Murphy DA, Glik DC, Anglin MD. Substance use recovery outcomes among a cohort of youth participating in a mobile-based texting aftercare pilot program. J Subst Abuse Treat 2014; 47(1): 20-26. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.01.010.
32. Thomas K, Müssener U, Linderoth C, Karlsson N, Bendtsen P, Bendtsen M. Effectiveness of a Text Messaging–Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2018; 6(6): e146. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.9642.
33. Lui JHL, Marcus DK, Barry CT. Evidence-based apps? A review of mental health mobile applications in a psychotherapy context. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2017; 48(3): 199-210. DOI: 10.1037/pro0000122.
34. Andersson G. Smartphone applications can help in treatment for alcoholism. Evidence-Based Mental Health 2015; 18(1): 27-7. DOI: 10.1136/eb-2014-101927.
35. Glass JE, McKay JR, Gustafson DH, Kornfield R, Rathouz PJ, Mc Tavish FM, et al. Treatment seeking as a mechanism of change in a randomized controlled trial of a mobile health intervention to support recovery from alcohol use disorders. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 77: 57-66. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.03.011.
36. Mellentin AI, Nielsen B, Nielsen AS, Yu F, Stenager E. A randomized controlled study of exposure therapy as aftercare for alcohol use disorder: study protocol. BMC Psychiatry 2016; 16: 112. DOI: 10.1186/s12888-016-0795-8.
37. Wieczorek Ł. Barriers in the access to alcohol treatment in outpatient clinics in urban and rural community. Psychiatr Pol 2017; 51(1): 125-38.

Wprowadzenie

Wyniki badań wskazują, że aplikacje mobilne są coraz powszechniej akceptowanym i użytecznym rodzajem interwencji z zakresu zdrowia [1]. Ich wykorzystanie nie jest jednak równomiernie rozłożone w poszczególnych obszarach świata i wśród różnych grup potencjalnych użytkowników. W badaniu Fox i Duggan [2] tylko 19% użytkowników smartfonów pobrało aplikację zdrowotną, w tym zaledwie 10% w grupie osób powyżej 65. roku życia. W Polsce w 2015 r. prawie co trzeci polski internauta (31%) korzystał z mobilnych aplikacji zdrowotnych i sportowych [3].

Badacze zauważają [4, 5], że o ile uzależnienie od alkoholu jest powszechnie traktowane jako choroba przewlekła, o tyle lecznictwo uzależnień rzadko oferuje jakiekolwiek formy długoterminowego wsparcia i zapobiegania nawrotom u pacjentów, którzy ukończyli leczenie. Odpowiedzią na te potrzeby mogą być aplikacje mobilne wspomagające wychodzenie z uzależnienia. Aplikacje są jednym ze sposobów na poszerzenie oferty terapeutycznej i dotarcie z interwencjami terapeutycznymi do osób, które z różnych powodów (takich jak ograniczona dostępność leczenia, bariery czasowe i finansowe, stygmatyzacja, brak możliwości zapewnienia opieki nad dzieckiem) nie szukają pomocy terapeutycznej pomimo doświadczanych problemów [6, 7].

Według danych zgromadzonych w pracy przeglądowej autorstwa Cohn i wsp. [8] 71% aplikacji o tematyce alkoholowej to aplikacje zachęcające do jego używania. Można je podzielić na pięć kategorii. Pierwsza obejmuje aplikacje rozrywkowe, m.in. takie jak gry o tematyce alkoholowej, testy koordynacji ruchowej, „alkomaty” zachęcające do dmuchnięcia w telefon. W kolejnej znalazły się instrukcje robienia drinków. Do trzeciej kategorii zaliczono aplikacje pomagające zakupić alkohol – znaleźć najbliższy sklep lub bar. W następnej znalazły się aplikacje o funkcji informacyjnej, prezentujące różne rodzaje alkoholi. Do ostatniej kategorii zaliczono aplikacje organizacyjne, pozwalające na tworzenie katalogów ulubionych win, piw i miejsc, w których można je kupić. Pozostałe aplikacje (29%) stanowią te, które można traktować jako aplikacje zniechęcające do używania alkoholu. Można je skategoryzować w trzech obszarach. Do pierwszego można zaliczyć aplikacje związane z poradnictwem i pełniące funkcję motywacyjną, z takimi funkcjonalnościami jak psychoedukacja oraz informacje zwrotne, np. na temat ilości pieniędzy zaoszczędzonych dzięki zaprzestaniu picia bądź liczby kalorii zawartych w różnych drinkach. W drugim obszarze znalazły się aplikacje wspierające – pomocne w radzeniu sobie z abstynencją i w ćwiczeniu samokontroli, z takimi funkcjonalnościami jak oszacowanie zawartości alkoholu we krwi, liczenie dni trzeźwości, ćwiczenia relaksacyjne, informacje z zakresu redukcji szkód. Do trzeciego obszaru zaliczono aplikacje poświęcone wsparciu społecznemu, zawierające informacje o mitingach Anonimowych Alkoholików, forach internetowych itp. Niniejszy artykuł stawia sobie za cel zidentyfikowanie aplikacji telefonicznych służących ograniczeniu picia alkoholu i określenie ich skuteczności.

Materiał i metody

Wyszukiwania artykułów do przeglądu dokonano we wrześniu 2018 r. Wykorzystano w tym celu dwie bazy artykułów: Web of Science (WoS) oraz EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO). Zakres wyszukiwania artykułów ograniczono do lat 2010–2018, tak aby analizie podlegały tylko najnowsze doniesienia naukowe. W trzy pola wyszukiwania artykułów wprowadzono jednocześnie zestaw słów kluczowych.
Pole nr 1: cell phone OR cellural phone OR mobile phone OR smartphone OR mobile health OR mHealth OR app OR apps OR application OR automated recovery support
AND
Pole nr 2: aftercare OR relapse prevention OR recovery OR continuing care OR treatment outcomes
AND
Pole nr 3: alcoholism OR addiction OR alcohol dependence OR alcohol OR alcohol use disorder OR AUD

Wyniki wyszukiwania w bazie Web of Science
Uzyskano 1036 wskazań, które następnie ograniczono przez wykorzystanie kryteriów zawężających. Wybrano publikacje tylko w języku polskim i angielskim, co dało 1004 wskazania. Następnie ograniczono rodzaj dokumentu do artykułu, przeglądu, książki, rozdziału w książce i uzyskano 974 wskazania. Kolejnym krokiem było wybranie dziedzin, których dotyczyły artykuły. Ograniczono je do: substance abuse, psychology, psychiatry, health care sciences services, social work, behavioural sciences, social sciences other topics, social issues, sociology, co dało 270 artykułów. Po przeczytaniu streszczeń wybrano artykuły spełniające cele przeglądu – w sumie 32 (ryc. 1).

Wyniki wyszukiwania w bazie EBSCO Publishing
Uzyskano 2419 wskazań, które następnie ograniczono przez kryteria zawężające. Pierwszym kryterium było występowanie wyszukiwanych słów kluczowych w streszczeniu. Po uwzględnieniu tego kryterium pozostało 805 artykułów. Następnie wybrano tylko publikacje w języku polskim i angielskim, co dało 778 wskazań. W kolejnym kroku wykorzystano thesaurus, w którym uwzględniono następujące kategorie: alcohol (15 artykułów), substance abuse treatment (15), disease relapse (12), treatment of alcoholism (12), alcoholism (9), mobile apps (9), substance abuse (9), descriptive statistics (8), prevention (8), randomised controlled trials (8), smartphones (8), telemedicine (8), treatment effectiveness (8), clinical trials (7), health outcome assessment (7), research methodology (7), social support (7), alcohol drinking (6), compulsive behaviour (6), wireless communication systems (6), economic development (1), industrial psychology (1), open source software (1), risk assessment (1), working hours (1). Artykuły mogły być przypisane do kilku kategorii. Dzięki temu ograniczeniu uzyskano 79 artykułów. Wyszukiwarka EBSCO Publishing usunęła dwa duplikaty. Po przeczytaniu streszczeń 77 publikacji wyłączono artykuły niespełniające kryteriów przeglądu – w efekcie wyselekcjonowano 12 artykułów (ryc. 2).

Kolejnym etapem było wyeliminowanie duplikatów wyszukiwania w bazach WoS i EBSCO oraz uzyskanie pełnych tekstów wyselekcjonowanych publikacji (z baz pełnotekstowych lub poprzez bezpośredni kontakt z autorami publikacji). W efekcie udało się dotrzeć do 33 pełnych tekstów artykułów, których treść poddano analizie.

Wyniki

Przegląd literatury pozwolił na zidentyfikowanie szeregu interwencji, które mają być pomocne w ograniczaniu używania alkoholu. Można je podzielić na trzy kategorie: 1) aplikacje telefoniczne, 2) strony internetowe, 3) interwencje wykorzystujące wiadomości tekstowe (SMS – short message service). Interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia służące ograniczaniu picia i ich skuteczność

Aplikacje telefoniczne
Na podstawie przeglądu literatury udało się zidentyfikować 10 różnych aplikacji telefonicznych, które miały służyć ograniczeniu używania alkoholu. Badania nad skutecznością aplikacji były na ogół prowadzone z udziałem grup eksperymentalnej i kontrolnej. W grupie eksperymentalnej stosowano standardowe oddziaływania (treatment as usual – TAU) i oddziaływania z wykorzystaniem aplikacji, natomiast w grupie kontrolnej uczestnicy byli poddawani tylko standardowemu leczeniu.

Wszystkie aplikacje dostępne są w języku angielskim, z wyjątkiem SIDEAL, która jest w języku hiszpańskim, oraz Alcohol Cue Exposure App, która jest w języku duńskim. Jedynie dwie aplikacje – SIDEAL i Ray’s Night Out – były dostępne w sklepie internetowym bez opłaty. Pozostałe aplikacje nie zostały jeszcze przekazane do domeny publicznej.

Do najszerzej opisanych w literaturze aplikacji należy Addiction – Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (A-CHESS). Została ona zaprojektowana na Uniwersytecie w Wisconsin (USA). Opiera się na teorii samodeterminacji (SDT), zakładającej, że zaspokojenie potrzeby autonomii (człowiek jako przyczyna zdarzeń), potrzeby kompetencji (umiejętności radzenia sobie) i potrzeby relacji (interakcji z innymi ludźmi, wsparcia społecznego) zapewnia optymalny rozwój [9, 10]. Aplikacja A-CHESS zawiera funkcjonalności odpowiadające różnym czynnikom ryzyka nawrotu uzależnienia i uwzględnia strategie zarówno specyficzne (identyfikacja sytuacji wysokiego ryzyka, radzenie sobie z wpadkami), jak i bardziej ogólne (propagowanie zrównoważonego trybu życia, zachęcanie do pozytywnych i nagradzających aktywności) [11].

W badaniach z wykorzystaniem aplikacji A-CHESS potwierdzono jej skuteczność [12]. U uczest- ników badania, którzy korzystali z aplikacji, stwierdzono ograniczenie liczby dni picia alkoholu w każdym momencie pomiaru – w 4., 8. i 12. miesiącu, co przekładało się na częstsze utrzymywanie abstynencji. Wykorzystanie aplikacji A-CHESS pozwala również skutecznie zapobiegać nawrotom picia. W badaniu Scott i wsp. [13] jedynie 2,7% respondentów używających aplikacji A-CHESS zgłosiło picie alkoholu. Yoo i wsp. [14] analizowali z kolei wpływ wsparcia emocjonalnego, jakie użytkownicy aplikacji A-CHESS mogli dać bądź otrzymać, uczestnicząc w grupach wsparcia online. Wyniki badania pokazują, że tego rodzaju wsparcie przynosi korzyści użytkownikom aplikacji, jednak wartość udzielania i otrzymywania wsparcia emocjonalnego w ramach grup społecznościowych spada w miarę upływu czasu.

Aplikację Location-Based Monitoring and Intervention for Alcohol Use Disorders (LBMI-A) stworzono przy wykorzystaniu modeli teoretycznych osadzonych w naukach behawioralnych oraz teorii komunikacji, wsparcia społecznego CRA (wzmacniania poprzez społeczność – community reinforcement approach) i samodeterminacji SDT (self-determination theory) [7, 15]. Zawiera siedem modułów psychoedukacyjnych: 1) monitorowanie używania alkoholu i informacje zwrotne; 2) miejsca, w których występuje ryzyko wypicia alkoholu; 3) osoby ważne, od których można uzyskać wsparcie; 4) głód picia i radzenie sobie z nim; 5) umiejętność rozwiązywania problemów; 6) komunikacja i umiejętność odmawiania; 7) aktywności niezwiązane z piciem sprawiające przyjemność.

Aplikacja LBMI-A okazała się skutecznym narzędziem wspomagającym leczenie. Jej użytkownicy częściej utrzymywali abstynencję w ciągu 6 tygodni, w czasie których prowadzono badanie, niż osoby znajdujące się w grupie kontrolnej. Wykorzystanie aplikacji przyczyniło się również do ograniczenia liczby dni intensywnego picia alkoholu i liczby dni picia w tygodniu. Badacze zaobserwowali, że w tygodniach, w których respondenci częściej używali aplikacji, można było odnotować mniejszą liczbę dni intensywnego picia i mniejszą liczbę dni picia w tygodniu [16].

Alcohol Cue Exposure App opiera się na naukowym podejściu do zagadnienia reakcji na ekspozycję na napoje alkoholowe (cue exposure therapy). Wykorzystuje filmy, które w atrakcyjny sposób prezentują picie alkoholu. Aplikacja składa się z czterech modułów: 1) wprowadzenia; 2) czterech sesji na temat radzenia sobie z występującym głodem; 3) ośmiu filmów w atrakcyjny sposób prezentujących picie alkoholu i jednocześnie ukazujących, jak można wykorzystać strategie radzenia sobie z głodem; 4) oceny postępów. Nasilenie pragnienia mierzy się przed pokazaniem filmu, w jego trakcie i po zakończeniu. Aplikacja była na etapie testowania, więc dane na temat efektywności nie były dostępne [17].

Aplikacja Daybreak została stworzona na podstawie interwencji internetowej prowadzonej na Hello Sunday Morning, która jest australijską platformą społecznościową z obszaru zdrowia publicznego. Użytkownicy platformy ustalają cel, jaki przed sobą stawiają: ograniczenie picia alkoholu bądź całkowita abstynencja, i dzielą się swoimi refleksjami na publicznym blogu. Aplikacja Daybreak pomaga zrealizować założone cele dzięki wsparciu społeczności zrzeszonej na platformie Hello Sunday Morning, czatom z coachem na temat zdrowego stylu życia i różnego rodzaju ćwiczeniom wpływającym na zmianę zachowania. Również i tę aplikację dopiero testowano, zatem dane o jej skuteczności nie były dostępne [18].

Aplikacja HealthCall opiera się na 2 komponentach. Pierwszy to monitorowanie funkcjonowania, drugi – spersonalizowana informacja zwrotna. W ramach monitorowania użytkownik codziennie wypełnia krótki kwestionariusz (2–4-minutowy). Pytania dotyczą używania alkoholu i narkotyków oraz innych zachowań. Po wypełnieniu kwestionariusza użytkownicy otrzymują wiadomość tekstową, która ma na celu podtrzymywanie motywacji do zmiany zachowania. W ramach drugiego komponentu aplikacji, po 30 i 60 dniach korzystania z niej, dostarczane są spersonalizowane informacje zwrotne: wykres picia alkoholu oraz zestawienie pozostałych danych wprowadzonych przez użytkownika w ramach pierwszego komponentu. Stanowią one podstawę do rozmowy ze specjalistą, podczas której określa się wzory używania substancji i poszukuje sposobów, by je zmienić i ograniczyć używanie substancji. Aplikacja HealthCall okazała się skuteczną pomocą pozwalającą ograniczyć używanie substancji psychoaktywnych. Osoby korzystające ze standardowego leczenia oraz wsparcia, jakie oferuje aplikacja, w dużo większym stopniu ograniczyły spożycie alkoholu i zażywanie narkotyków niż osoby, które były poddane tylko standardowym oddziaływaniom. W przypadku alkoholu – grupa używająca aplikacji piła średnio o 33% mniej niż grupa kontrolna (IRR = 0,67; 95% CI: 0,41–1,07). Podobnie było w przypadku liczby wypijanych standardowych drinków podczas jednego dnia picia. Użytkownicy aplikacji wypijali o 37% mniej drinków niż badani z grupy kontrolnej (IRR = 0,63; 95% CI: 0,36–1,11) [19].

Aplikacja SEVA została opracowana z myślą o wdrożeniu w podstawowej opiece zdrowotnej. Ma służyć edukacji i reintegracji społecznej osób uzależnionych. Leczenie opiera się przede wszystkim na edukacji (therapeutic education system) oraz 65 interaktywnych modułach multimedialnych. Mają one na celu rozwój trzech typów umiejętności: 1) poznawczo-behawioralnych (np. odmawianie używania substancji, zmiana przekonań na jej temat), 2) pozwalających na zmianę własnego życia (np. zwiększenie aktywności), 3) związanych z zapobieganiem zarażeniu HIV, HCV i innymi chorobami przenoszonymi drogą płciową. Każdy z 65 modułów kończy się quizem, którego celem jest weryfikacja pozyskanej wiedzy i umiejętności. Komponent reintegracji społecznej został opracowany na podstawie aplikacji A-CHESS.

Użytkownicy aplikacji SEVA wykazywali znaczną poprawę, kiedy porównano pierwszy pomiar z pomiarem po 6 miesiącach korzystania z niej. W tym czasie ograniczyli oni liczbę dni picia w sposób ryzykowny (44-proc. spadek, p = 0,04, effect size = –0,199) i liczbę dni, w których zażywali narkotyki (34-proc. spadek, p = 0,01, effect size = –0,248). Zaobserwowano również poprawę na skali oceniającej ogólną jakość życia oraz jakość funkcjonowania fizycznego i psychicznego. Zmniejszyła się liczba hospitalizacji i wizyt na izbie przyjęć, a zwiększyła częstość wykonywania testów na obecność HIV [20, 21].

Aplikacja SIDEAL swoje teoretyczne podstawy opiera na dialogu motywującym. Jest dostępna bezpłatnie i jedynie w języku hiszpańskim. Można ją pobrać i używać bez konieczności rejestrowania się. Jednak bez rejestracji liczba funkcji jest ograniczona: można ustalić cel leczenia, monitorować konsumpcję alkoholu, przedstawić ją w formie wizualnej z oznaczeniem przyjętych limitów, uzyskać dostęp do psychoedukacji i do infolinii pomocowej. W celu rozszerzenia zakresu funkcjonalności należy założyć konto użytkownika i skonfigurować ustawienia dla indywidualnego odbiorcy. Niezbędny jest wówczas kontakt z profesjonalistą – terapeutą. Użytkownicy, którzy korzystali z aplikacji pod okiem profesjonalisty, mieli dodatkowo dostęp do aktualizowanych przez specjalistę celów terapeutycznych i otrzymywali zalecenia dotyczące potrzebnych oddziaływań, mieli także możliwość rejestrowania i monitorowania przestrzegania zaleceń terapeutycznych, otrzymywali raz w tygodniu spersonalizowane informacje zwrotne oraz wiadomości tekstowe zawierające porady terapeutyczne. Wiadomości były wybierane losowo spośród puli 50 wiadomości przygotowanych przez panel ekspertów. Aplikacja była w fazie testów, zatem dane dotyczące jej efektywności nie były dostępne [22]. You i wsp. [23] wykorzystali aplikację SoberDiary wraz z alkomatem połączonym z telefonem przez Bluetooth w celu monitorowania zachowań związanych z piciem wśród osób uzależnionych. Alkomat mierzył poziom alkoholu w wydychanym powietrzu i przekazywał dane bezpośrednio do aplikacji. W czasie wykonywania testu użytkownik musiał patrzeć we wbudowaną frontową kamerę telefonu, by potwierdzić swoją tożsamość podczas 5-sekundowego procesu wydychania powietrza.

Użytkownicy aplikacji ograniczyli picie alkoholu i wydłużyli okresy utrzymywania abstynencji. Subiektywne poczucie jakości życia zostało ocenione wyżej niż podczas pierwszego pomiaru – przed rozpoczęciem korzystania z aplikacji.

Dwie aplikacje spośród tych, do których udało się dotrzeć autorom niniejszego przeglądu, były testowane wśród młodzieży – Ray’s Night Out i TeleCoach. Ray’s Night Out jest aplikacją mającą charakter gry, w której główną postacią jest awatar czerwonej pandy imieniem Ray. Użytkownik może zabrać pandę na szaloną imprezę bądź ofiarować jej spokojny wieczór. Cele aplikacji są następujące: dostarczenie informacji o skutkach picia alkoholu, zmotywowanie do zmiany zachowania i nauka nowych umiejętności społecznych. Użytkownik wciela się w pandę i ustala dla niej limit picia, który ona próbuje utrzymać. Może kupować napoje alkoholowe dla pandy, ma także podgląd liczby zakupionych drinków, co pozwala monitorować picie. Użytkownik powinien dbać o Raya – sama aplikacja go do tego motywuje. Jeśli wywiązuje się z tego zadania, otrzymuje punkty zwane dobrymi wibracjami, które odblokowują różne nagrody. Punkty można zdobyć za wykorzystanie przez Raya strategii ochronnych, np. dawanie mu do picia napojów bezalkoholowych, jedzenia, angażowanie go w różne aktywności, takie jak taniec, relaksacja czy flirtowanie. Informacje o tych strategiach i skutkach intoksykacji alkoholem są dostarczane za pomocą interaktywnych komunikatów, np. „Jesteś pewien? Jestem dość pijany”. Użytkownicy zyskują również wiedzę na temat skutków używania alkoholu przez wizualizację zachowania Raya, widzą np. niemożność utrzymania równowagi, niski poziom energii. Jeśli Ray przekroczy ustalony przez użytkownika limit picia, zaczyna wymiotować i mdleć. Wszystko to ma ukazać pozytywne skutki trzymania się planu picia i negatywne konsekwencje przekroczenia założonego limitu.

Badania nad skutecznością Ray’s Night Out były prowadzone wśród młodzieży w wieku 16–25 lat. Wyniki pokazały, że w ciągu miesiąca używania aplikacji wiedza na temat alkoholu i szkód, jakie przynosi dla organizmu, zwiększyła się. Porównawszy wyniki pomiarów dokonanych w momencie rozpoczęcia korzystania z aplikacji i po miesiącu korzystania z niej, stwierdzono u użytkowników niewielką zmianę w ilości spożywanego alkoholu. Na podstawie kolejnych pomiarów, dokonanych w 2., 3. i 6. miesiącu używania aplikacji, stwierdzono, że picie dalej utrzymywało się na tym samym poziomie. Nie zaobserwowano także żadnych różnic w piciu alkoholu w sposób ryzykowny podczas jednej okazji picia. Odsetek uczestników, którzy nie doświadczali problemów wynikających z picia alkoholu, wzrósł z 25% do 48% po 6 miesiącach używania aplikacji. Nie odnotowano jednak poprawy wśród osób, które doświadczały problemów z powodu picia alkoholu – używanie aplikacji nie wpłynęło na ograniczenie przez nich picia. Aplikacja Ray’s Night Out została oceniona pozytywnie przez jej użytkowników – miała przyjazny dla młodzieży wygląd i w dostępny sposób przekazywała wiedzę na temat alkoholu [24].

TeleCoach jest aplikacją składającą się z dwóch głównych komponentów: monitorowania konsumpcji alkoholu w ciągu ostatniego tygodnia i modułu zapobiegania nawrotom oferującego dwie strategie – „mówienie nie” oraz „lepsze samopoczucie bez alkoholu”. Strategia odmawiania zawiera dwie opcje: naukę analizy ryzyka oraz trening odmawiania picia. Analiza ryzyka wynikającego z używania alkoholu polega na odpowiedzi na pytania zawarte w Skali Poczucia Własnej Skuteczności w Utrzymaniu Abstynencji (AASE) i informacji zwrotnej dotyczącej sytuacji zagrożenia. Trening odmawiania alkoholu ujęto w formie tekstowej. Strategia lepszego samopoczucia bez alkoholu pozwala na wybór nagrań ćwiczeń relaksacyjnych, ćwiczeń z obszaru pozytywnego myślenia i nagrań uczestnictwa w treningu radzenia sobie z głodem alkoholowym. Aplikacja była testowana wśród studentów szwedzkich uniwersytetów, którzy nadużywali alkoholu. Wyniki badania pokazały, że wykorzystanie aplikacji do ograniczania picia przyniosło pożądane efekty. Z pomiaru przeprowadzonego po 6 tygodniach używania aplikacji wynika, że – w porównaniu z pomiarem początkowym – zmniejszyła się częstość picia i ilość wypijanego alkoholu. Większe spadki były obserwowane w grupie eksperymentalnej niż w grupie kontrolnej. Jak donoszą badacze, na zmianę wzoru picia mógł mieć jednak wpływ e-mail na temat używania alkoholu w sposób ryzykowny, który otrzymali respondenci z grupy eksperymentalnej. Osoby z grupy kontrolnej nie otrzymały takiej wiadomości [25]. Strony internetowe

InTheRooms.com jest stroną internetową przeznaczoną dla osób uzależnionych od substancji psychoaktywnych, będących w trakcie zdrowienia. Serwis jest bezpłatny i dostępny przez całą dobę. Na stronie można znaleźć 118 mitingów prowadzonych w czasie rzeczywistym, z czego 67% opiera się na podejściu 12 Kroków Anonimowych Alkoholików i Anonimowych Narkomanów. Reszta mitingów (33%) dotyczy innych zaburzeń. Dodatkowo strona udostępnia nagrania z relacjami osób, które uporały się z uzależnieniem, oraz fora dyskusyjne, na których korzystający mogą dzielić się swoimi doświadczeniami, komentować doświadczenia innych i wchodzić ze sobą w interakcje. Użytkownicy serwisu mogą otrzymywać przypomnienia o medytacjach mających na celu wzmocnienie refleksji nad zmianą własnego zachowania. Zarejestrowani użytkownicy mają dostęp do wyszukiwarki mitingów odbywających się w rzeczywistości, na które mogliby się udać. Respondenci spędzali na stronie średnio 30 minut dziennie kilka razy w tygodniu. Najchętniej korzystali z medytacji i mitingów odbywających się online w czasie rzeczywistym. Długość pozostawania w abstynencji nie miała wpływu na dostrzeganie korzyści wynikających z korzystania z serwisu. Zarówno osoby pozostające krócej niż rok w abstynencji, jak i te, które utrzymywały ją dłużej, były zdania, że korzystanie z funkcjonalności strony poprawia ich motywację do zmiany zachowania nałogowego i wpływa na utrzymywanie abstynencji. W ocenie około 70% badanych korzystanie z serwisu pozwala na poradzenie sobie z pojawiającym się głodem oraz wzmacnia identyfikację z problemem [26].

Overcoming Addiction jest kolejną interwencją wykorzystującą stronę internetową. Ma ona wspomagać osoby w utrzymywaniu abstynencji i wzmacniać motywację do zmiany zachowania nałogowego. Zawiera cztery oddzielne moduły, które dotyczą: alkoholu, marihuany, stymulantów i opioidów. W każdym z nich dostępne są interaktywne ćwiczenia oparte na programie terapeutycznym SMART. Podobnie jak program SMART, również oddziaływania w ramach strony internetowej dotyczą wzmacniania motywacji do zmiany, radzenia sobie z głodem, nauki radzenia sobie z problemami bez używania substancji psychoaktywnych oraz kształtowania pozytywnego, zrównoważonego i zdrowego stylu życia. Serwis pozwala na monitorowanie występowania głodu alkoholowego, ustanawianie celów i ich zmianę, udostępnia ćwiczenia mindfulness, których celem jest przeciwdziałanie nawrotom.

Wykorzystanie interwencji Overcoming Addiction przyczyniło się do zwiększenia liczby dni utrzymywania abstynencji (z 44% w pierwszym pomiarze do 72% w drugim, p < 0,001), ograniczenia średniej liczby drinków wypijanych podczas jednej okazji (z 8,0 do 4,6, p < 0,001) oraz liczby problemów wynikających z picia i używania innych substancji psychoaktywnych (p < 0,001) [27, 28].

Interwencje wykorzystujące wiadomości tekstowe
Wiadomości tekstowe są wykorzystywane jako rodzaj interwencji, której celem jest ograniczenie używania substancji psychoaktywnych. Badania donoszą, że są one atrakcyjną formą pomocy wspierającej zdrowienie [29]. W badaniach Lucht i wsp. [30] wykorzystywano wiadomości tekstowe do zmiany zachowania związanego z używaniem alkoholu przez osoby, które leczyły się na oddziale detoksykacyjnym. Wiadomości tekstowe były wysyłane dwa razy w tygodniu; łącznie przez 8 tygodni wysyłano 16 SMS-ów do danej osoby. Wiadomość była spersonalizowana i brzmiała tak: „Szanowny/a Panie/Pani [imię], czy pił/a Pan/Pani alkohol bądź potrzebuje Pan/Pani pomocy? Proszę odpowiedzieć A, jeśli tak, bądź B, jeśli nie”. System monitorujący wiadomości kategoryzował je w zależności od odpowiedzi i czasu, w jakim została ona przesłana, co umożliwiało wyselekcjonowanie osób najbardziej potrzebujących. System, uzyskawszy w ciągu 24 godzin odpowiedź A, przesyłał wiadomość e-mail do terapeuty z prośbą o kontakt z pacjentem. Do osób, które odesłały odpowiedź B, był wysyłany SMS z treścią motywującą. Był on dobierany losowo przez system spośród przygotowanych wcześniej 40 wiadomości typu: „Dobra robota!”, „W razie potrzeby nie obawiaj się z nami skontaktować!”. Wiadomości o innej treści niż A lub B były kategoryzowane jako nietypowe i przesyłane e-mailem do terapeutów, którzy je oceniali i decydowali, czy nadawca potrzebuje pomocy. W sytuacji, gdy pacjent nie odpowiedział przez 24 godziny, system również przesyłał e-mail do terapeuty, by ten skontaktował się z pacjentem.

Interwencja wykorzystująca wiadomości tekstowe okazała się skuteczna. Osoby, które otrzymywały SMS-y, częściej spożywały alkohol w sposób bezpieczny w porównaniu z respondentami z grupy kontrolnej (TAU) – odpowiednio 55,7% i 40% badanych (risk difference: 0,16; 95% CI: 0,06–0,37; β = –0,799; p = 0,122). Nie odnotowano różnic między grupą eksperymentalną a kontrolną w średniej liczbie dni picia, liczbie drinków wypijanych podczas typowego dnia picia i liczbie dni picia ryzykownego, podczas którego wypijano więcej niż sześć standardowych dawek alkoholu. Skuteczność wsparcia z wykorzystaniem wiadomości SMS jest wyższa w przypadku osób, które piją mniej. Dla osób pijących alkohol w dużych ilościach tego rodzaju wsparcie może być niewystarczające. Jedynie 20% wiadomości przesłanych od pacjentów wymagało interwencji terapeutycznej. Dwóch konsultantów było w stanie wspierać 42 osoby, jeden wykonywał średnio niecałe dwa połączenia dziennie [30].

Gonzales i wsp. [31] analizowali wpływ wiadomości tekstowych na funkcjonowanie osób w wieku 12–24 lat uzależnionych od substancji psychoaktywnych, które ukończyły leczenie. Do respondentów wysyłano trzy rodzaje wiadomości: 1) proponowanie monitorowania picia i funkcjonowania, 2) przekazywanie wskazówek dotyczących poprawy stanu zdrowia, 3) dostarczanie wiedzy na temat używania substancji psychoaktywnych i informowanie, gdzie można uzyskać pomoc w trudnych sytuacjach. Wiadomości na temat monitorowania picia i funkcjonowania odnosiły się do sytuacji i zachowań mogących spowodować nawrót, m.in. małej pewności siebie, stresu, złego nastroju, braku zaangażowania w aktywności, których celem jest utrzymywanie abstynencji. Tego typu wiadomości były wysyłane codziennie po południu. Jeśli respondent odpowiedział na wiadomość, system generował automatyczną odpowiedź motywującą lub zawierającą wskazówki, jak radzić sobie w trudnych sytuacjach. Pula wiadomości zwrotnych była duża – 600, tak aby żadna nie mogła się powtórzyć w trakcie 12-tygodniowej interwencji. Do użytkowników, którzy nie udzielili odpowiedzi, były wysłane dwa powiadomienia – pierwsze wieczorem tego samego dnia, drugie do południa dnia następnego. Wiadomości, których celem była poprawa stanu zdrowia, miały charakter wskazówek i były wysyłane codziennie w południe. Dotyczyły zmiany zachowania nałogowego, poprawy funkcjonowania, np. „Dzisiaj jest kolejny dzień twojego zdrowienia, zastanów się nad zmianą, nad którą pracujesz”. Wiadomości edukacyjne – na temat używania substancji i z informacjami o możliwościach uzyskania pomocy w trudnych sytuacjach – były wysyłane w weekendy. Teksty edukacyjne mówiły o konsekwencjach wynikających z używania danej substancji. Informacje o źródłach pomocy w trudnych sytuacjach dotyczyły instytucji ją świadczących w miejscu zamieszkania respondenta.

Młodzież, która otrzymywała wiadomości SMS, rzadziej wracała do wzoru picia reprezentowanego przed rozpoczęciem leczenia w porównaniu z grupą kontrolną (OR = 0,52; p = 0,002). Osoby z grupy eksperymentalnej zgłaszały znacznie mniej problemów wynikających z używania substancji (β = –0,46; p = 0,03) i chętniej uczestniczyły w aktywnościach dodatkowych związanych z leczeniem (β = 1,63; p = 0,03) w porównaniu z respondentami z grupy kontrolnej [31].

Skuteczność wiadomości tekstowych była testowana również w grupie studentów. Interwencję SMS-ową prowadzono przez 6 tygodni, wykorzystując łącznie 62 wiadomości. Miały one motywować do ograniczenia używania alkoholu, zwiększać umiejętność samokontroli, zwiększać poczucie własnej skuteczności i uświadamiać, że można uzyskać wsparcie społeczne, w tym ze strony profesjonalistów. Przez pierwsze 4 tygodnie interwencji wiadomości tekstowe były wysyłane częściej – dziewięć w każdym tygodniu, z czasem ich liczba malała. Uczestnicy interwencji byli proszeni o przesłanie wiadomości zwrotnej informującej o liczbie drinków wypitych w poprzednim tygodniu. W odpowiedzi otrzymywali kolejną wiadomość tekstową z informacją zwrotną o realizacji celów – czy ich picie mieściło się w ustalonym na początku interwencji limicie. Raportowanie ilości wypijanego alkoholu i otrzymywanie informacji zwrotnej odbywało się raz w tygodniu, w niedzielę. W tym badaniu nie odnotowano żadnych istotnych statystycznie różnic między grupą eksperymentalną a kontrolną, w której prowadzono standardowe oddziaływania [32].

Ograniczenia metodologiczne badań
Autorzy przeglądów literatury wskazują na ograniczenia metodologiczne publikowanych badań dotyczących wykorzystania interwencji z obszaru mZdrowia. Lui i wsp. [33] zauważają, że w wypadku żadnej spośród 21 publikacji uwzględnionych w przeglądzie nie zweryfikowano skuteczności aplikacji, testując je ponownie na podobnej grupie odbiorców. Stanowi to istotne ograniczenie – bez niezależnych badań replikacyjnych trudno mówić, że efektywność aplikacji telefonicznych w obszarze zdrowia psychicznego została wystarczająco udokumentowana [33].

Problemem jest także to, że postęp technologiczny w obszarze mZdrowia jest niezwykle szybki: w momencie, kiedy dostępne będą potwierdzone przez kilka źródeł wyniki o skuteczności konkretnej aplikacji, jej technologia może być już przestarzała [15]. Ponadto aplikacje są bytami niezwykle efemerycznymi – w wypadku przeglądu Ramsey [7] 35% opisywanych w nim aplikacji nie było już dostępnych w momencie ukończenia przeglądu.

Badania prowadzone przez Quanbeck i wsp. [21] nad implementacją aplikacji SEVA na poziomie podstawowej opieki zdrowotnej pokazały, że po zakończeniu interwencji i zaprzestaniu opłacania abonamentu jej używanie było mniej intensywne. Może to oznaczać, że darmowe aparaty telefoniczne, które dostawali respondenci, i opłacany w ramach projektu abonament miały wpływ na intensywność używania aplikacji. Podobne spostrzeżenia ma Andersson [34], który podkreśla, że dla uczestników interwencji korzystne może być otrzymanie telefonu, co wpływa na postrzeganie aplikacji. Tym samym motywacją do uczestnictwa w badaniu może być bezpłatne otrzymanie telefonu, a nie poprawa funkcjonowania społecznego bądź zmiana zachowania nałogowego.

Niewykluczone, że na intensywność korzystania z aplikacji ma także wpływ doświadczenie w posługiwaniu się telefonem. Osoby, które nie miały wcześniej smartfona, mogą częściej korzystać z aplikacji niż osoby, które mają doświadczenie z tego typu urządzeniami, co może przekładać się na ocenę skuteczności aplikacji. Na efektywność mogą również wpływać kontakty z badaczami spowodowane awarią telefonu – bywa, że respondenci traktują te kontakty jako wzmocnienie zachęcające do dalszego zdrowienia [34].

Omówienie

Celem niniejszego przeglądu literatury było zidentyfikowanie aplikacji telefonicznych służących do ograniczania picia, przedstawienie sposobu ich działania i określenie ich skuteczności. Przegląd pokazał, że w ciągu 8 lat opisano w czasopismach naukowych 10 różnych aplikacji telefonicznych, których celem było ograniczenie używania alkoholu, oraz dwie strony internetowe będące platformami, na których osoby uzależnione mogły znaleźć pomoc. W tym czasie przeprowadzono również badania z wykorzystaniem wiadomości tekstowych jako formy interwencji mającej na celu ograniczenie picia. Badania, które uwzględniono w niniejszym przeglądzie, pokazały, że interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia mogą być skuteczną formą wsparcia w terapii uzależnień i istotnie przyczynić się do zwiększenia liczby dni utrzymywania abstynencji oraz poprawy funkcjonowania społecznego.

Można wskazać szereg korzyści wynikających ze stosowania interwencji z obszaru mZdrowia dla ograniczania używania alkoholu i poprawy funkcjonowania społecznego. Aplikacje telefoniczne i inne tego typu interwencje poszerzają dostępną ofertę leczenia dla osób uzależnionych i pozwalają na poprawę skuteczności terapii [22]. Dzięki nim picie staje się mniej ryzykowne [34]. Aplikacje przyczyniają się do większej akceptacji dla utrzymywania abstynencji, poprawiają także komunikację między pacjentem a profesjonalistą. Wykorzystanie aplikacji w terapii osób uzależnionych może przyczynić się do wzmocnienia więzi między pacjentem a instytucjami świadczącymi pomoc dla tej grupy odbiorców. Może to być korzystne dla osób kończących terapię w placówkach stacjonarnych i podejmujących leczenie w systemie ambulatoryjnym. Korzystanie ze wsparcia w postaci aplikacji, np. A-CHESS, sprawiało, że jej użytkownicy odnotowywali mniej dni, w których pili alkohol, co przekładało się na częstsze nieprzerywanie leczenia ambulatoryjnego [35]. Nawet wówczas, gdy efekty działania aplikacji nie są spektakularne, to korzystanie z nich ma pozytywne skutki, gdyż zmniejsza koszty wynikające z używania alkoholu, np. koszty leczenia [22, 34]. Wymierne korzyści ekonomiczne stosowania interwencji z obszaru mZdrowia wynikają z ograniczenia liczby kontaktów z terapeutami, czyli mniejszej liczby konsultacji. Szczególnie istotne jest to w krajach, w których odchodzi się od konsultacji indywidualnych na rzecz wsparcia grupowego, a czas terapii ulega skróceniu. Wykorzystanie aplikacji może być atrakcyjną formą wsparcia dla osób uzależnionych [17, 36]. Wedle badania Gustafsona i wsp. [12] koszt używania aplikacji A-CHESS w ciągu 8 miesięcy przez jednego pacjenta wyniósł 597 dolarów amerykańskich, z uwzględnieniem kosztów doradcy, administratora systemu, ułożenia planu dla każdego użytkownika oraz telefonów. W przypadku aplikacji SEVA, implementowanej na poziomie podstawowej opieki zdrowotnej, koszt wsparcia jednego pacjenta przez 12 miesięcy oszacowano na 1400 dolarów amerykańskich [21]. Koszty interwencji prowadzonych w formie aplikacji telefonicznych będą się jednak stale zmniejszać, podobnie jak maleją ceny urządzeń elektronicznych i oprogramowania [12].

Użytkownicy aplikacji telefonicznych mogą z nich korzystać w dowolnym miejscu i czasie, dostosowując aktywność do swojego planu dnia. Dla osób, które miałyby utrudniony dostęp do placówki z powodu barier geograficznych, obowiązków zawodowych czy rodzinnych lub które nigdy nie trafiłyby do lecznictwa z uwagi na różne bariery, interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia mogą być dobrą alternatywą. Rozwój aplikacji telefonicznych i innego rodzaju nowych technologii pozwala objąć oddziaływaniami większe grono odbiorców, także po zakończeniu leczenia w placówce, i podtrzymać jego efekty [36]. Istotną zmienną związaną z korzystaniem z aplikacji jest możliwość pozostania anonimowym. Obawa przed utratą anonimowości stanowi jedną z barier w podejmowaniu leczenia, na którą trafiają osoby uzależnione od alkoholu [37]. Niektóre aplikacje zawierają również komponent społecznościowy – fora, czaty. Zaangażowanie w społeczność pozwala na wymianę doświadczeń, udzielanie rad, tworzenie sieci wsparcia, co może być pomocne w wychodzeniu z uzależnienia [5, 12].

Obiecujące wyniki uzyskano, wykorzystując wiadomości tekstowe. Wiadomości SMS mają szereg zalet – mogą być przeczytane od razu po otrzymaniu, w każdym miejscu, a ich przeczytanie trwa tylko chwilę, i tym samym niewiele jest barier utrudniających kontakt z zainteresowanymi. Dzięki wiadomościom tekstowym można dotrzeć do dużej populacji, która posiada telefony komórkowe. Interwencje z użyciem SMS-ów należą również do niskokosztowych [30, 32].

Interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia mają pewne ograniczenia. Osoby z ograniczeniami poznawczymi mogą mieć trudności z wykorzystaniem aplikacji do wspomagania leczenia. Techniczna obsługa smartfona i aplikacji wydaje się w ich przypadku skomplikowana i przez to może nie przynosić pozytywnych rezultatów [22]. Korzystanie z samej aplikacji bez osobistych kontaktów z terapeutą może także obniżać skuteczność leczenia [17]. Badania pokazują, że zaangażowanie w używanie aplikacji wspomagającej leczenie spada wraz z ograniczeniem używania alkoholu. Użytkownicy mogą przypuszczać, że skoro ograniczyli picie, mogą również ograniczyć korzystanie z aplikacji, co niesie ze sobą ryzyko nawrotu [16].

Wnioski

Interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia są coraz częściej stosowane jako forma wsparcia w leczeniu uzależnienia od alkoholu. Najczęściej wykorzystywane są w tym celu aplikacje instalowane na telefonie komórkowym, jednak dość dużą popularnością cieszą się także interwencje z użyciem wiadomości tekstowych. Wyniki badań pokazują, że interwencje z obszaru mZdrowia stanowią skuteczną formę wsparcia w dążeniu do zmiany zachowania nałogowego. Ich skuteczność obniża się jednak, kiedy nie są utrzymane osobiste kontakty z terapeutą. Stosowanie aplikacji w grupie młodzieży nie przynosi tak spektakularnych rezultatów jak w grupie dorosłych, co wskazuje na potrzebę pogłębienia analiz w tym obszarze i poznania przyczyn obniżonej skuteczności.

Konflikt interesów

Nie występuje.

Finansowanie

Projekt „Wykorzystanie nowych technologii w procesie zdrowienia z uzależnienia (mWSPARCIE 2018–2020)” finansowany przez Państwową Agencję Rozwiązywania Problemów Alkoholowych w ramach realizacji zadań Narodowego Programu Zdrowia 2016–2020 (umowa 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Etyka

Treści przedstawione w pracy są zgodne z zasadami Deklaracji Helsińskiej odnoszącymi się do badań z udziałem ludzi, ujednoliconymi wymaganiami dla czasopism biomedycznych oraz z zasadami etycznymi określonymi w Porozumieniu z Farmington w 1997 roku.

Piśmiennictwo

1. Payne HE, Lister C, West JH, Bernhardt JM. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015; 3(1). DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.3335.
2. Fox S, Duggan M. Tracking for Health. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. Washingon, DC: PewResearchCenter; 2013.
3. Zadarko-Domaradzka M, Zadarko E. Aplikacje zdrowotne na urządzenia mobilne w edukacji zdrowotnej społeczeństwa. Edukacja – Technika – Informatyka 2016; 7(4): 291-93. DOI: 10.15584/eti.2016.4.37.
4. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
5. Gustafson DH, Boyle MG, Shaw BR, Isham A, McTavish F, Richards S, et al. An E-Health Solution for People With Alcohol Problems. Alcohol Res Health 2011; 33(4): 327-37.
6. Hoeppner BB, Schick MR, Kelly LM, Hoeppner SS, Bergman B, Kelly JF. There is an app for that – Or is there? A content analysis of publicly available smartphone apps for managing alcohol use. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 82: 67-73. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.09.006.
7. Ramsey A. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80. DOI: 10.1007/s11469-015-9551-4.
8. Cohn AM, Hunter-Reel D, Hagman BT, Mitchell J. Promoting behavior change from alcohol use through mobile technology: the future of ecological momentary assessment. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2011; 35(12): 2209-15. DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01571.x.
9. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an Evidence-Based, Theoretically Informed, Mobile Technology-Based System to Improve Outcomes for People in Recovery for Alcohol Dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111. DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2011.521413.
10. Gustafson DH, Landucci G, McTavish F, Kornfield R, Johndon RA, Mare M-L, et al. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial. Trials 2016; 17: 592. DOI: 10.1186/s13063-016-1726-1.
11. McTavish FM, Chih MY, Shah D, Gustafson DH. How Patients Recovering From Alcoholism Use a Smartphone Intervention. J Dual Diagn 2012; 8(4): 294-304.
12. Gustafson DH, McTavish FM, Chih M-Y, Atwood AK, Johnson RA, Boyle MG, et al. A smartphone application to support recovery from alcoholism: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry 2014; 71(5): 566-72. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4642.
13. Scott CK, Dennis ML, Gustafson DH. Using ecological momentary assessments to predict relapse after adult substance use treatment. Addict Behav 2018; 82: 72-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.02.025.
14. Yoo W, Shah DV, Chih M-Y, Gustafson DH. Predicting changes in giving and receiving emotional support within a smartphone-based alcoholism support group. Computers in Human Behavior 2018; 78: 261-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.10.006.
15. Quanbeck AR, Gustafson DH, Marsch LA, Mc Tavish F, Brown RT, Mares ML, et al. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study. Implement Sci 2014; 9: 65. DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-9-65.
16. Gonzalez VM, Dulin PL. Comparison of a smartphone app for alcohol use disorders with an Internet-based intervention plus bibliotherapy: A pilot study. J Consult Clin Psychol 2015; 83(2): 335-45. DOI: 10.1037/a0038620.
17. Mellentin AI, Stenager E, Nielsen B, Nielsen AS, Yu F. A Smarter Pathway for Delivering Cue Exposure Therapy? The Design and Development of a Smartphone App Targeting Alcohol Use Disorder. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2017; 5(1): e5. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.6500.
18. Tait RJ, Kirkman JJL, Schaub MP. A Participatory Health Promotion Mobile App Addressing Alcohol Use Problems (The Daybreak Program): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Res Protoc 2018; 7(5): e148. DOI: 10.2196/resprot.9982.
19. Aharonovich E, Stohl M, Cannizzaro D, Hasin D. HealthCall delivered via smartphone to reduce co-occurring drug and alcohol use in HIV-infected adults: A randomized pilot trial. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 83: 15-26. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.09.013.
20. Quanbeck A, Chih MY, Isham A, Gustafson D. Mobile Delivery of Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorders: A Review of the Literature. Alcohol Res 2014; 36(1): 111-22.
21. Quanbeck A, Gustafson DH, Marsch LA, Chih MY, Kornfield R, Mc Tavish F, et al. Implementing a Mobile Health System to Integrate the Treatment of Addiction Into Primary Care: A Hybrid Implementation-Effectiveness Study. J Med Internet Res 2018; 20(1): e37. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.8928.
22. Barrio P, Ortega L, Bona X, Gual A. Development, Validation, and Implementation of an Innovative Mobile App for Alcohol Dependence Management: Protocol for the SIDEAL Trial. JMIR Res Protoc 2016; 5(1): e27. DOI: 10.2196/resprot.5002.
23. You C-W, Chen Y-C, Chen C-H, Lee C-H, Kuo P-H, Huang M-C, et al. Smartphone-based support system (SoberDiary) coupled with a Bluetooth breathalyser for treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent patients. Addict Behav 2017; 65: 174-78. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.10.017.
24. Hides L, Quinn C, Cockshaw W, Stoyanov SR, Zelenko O, Johnson D, et al. Efficacy and outcomes of a mobile app targeting alcohol use in young people. Addict Behav 2018; 77: 89-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.09.020.
25. Gajecki M, Andersson C, Rosendahl I, Sinadinovic K, Fredriksson M, Berman AH. Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Int J Behav Med 2017; 24(5): 778-88. DOI: 10.1007/s12529-016-9629-9.
26. Bergman BG, Kelly NW, Hoeppner BB, Vilsaint CL, Kelly JF. Digital recovery management: Characterizing recovery-specific social network site participation and perceived benefit. Psychol Addict Behav 2017; 31(4): 506-12. DOI: 10.1037/adb0000255.
27. Hester RK, Lenberg KL, Campbell W, Delaney HD. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-based application, and SMART Recovery, an online and in-person mutual help group for problem drinkers, part 1: three-month outcomes of a randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res 2013; 15(7): e134. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.2565.
28. Campbell W, Hester RK, Lenberg KL, Delaney HD. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 2: Six-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Feedback From Participants. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2016; 18(10): e262. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.5508.
29. Muench F, Weiss RA, Kuerbis A, Morgenstern J. Developing a theory driven text messaging intervention for addiction care with user driven content. Psychol Addict Behav 2013; 27(1): 315-21. DOI: 10.1037/a0029963.
30. Lucht MJ, Hoffman L, Haug S, Meyer C, Pussehl D, Quellmalz A, et al. A surveillance tool using mobile phone short message service to reduce alcohol consumption among alcohol-dependent patients. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2014; 38(6): 1728-36. DOI: 10.1111/acer.12403.
31. Gonzales R, Ang A, Murphy DA, Glik DC, Anglin MD. Substance use recovery outcomes among a cohort of youth participating in a mobile-based texting aftercare pilot program. J Subst Abuse Treat 2014; 47(1): 20-26. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.01.010.
32. Thomas K, Müssener U, Linderoth C, Karlsson N, Bendtsen P, Bendtsen M. Effectiveness of a Text Messaging–Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR mHealth and uHealth 2018; 6(6): e146. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.9642.
33. Lui JHL, Marcus DK, Barry CT. Evidence-based apps? A review of mental health mobile applications in a psychotherapy context. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2017; 48(3): 199-210. DOI: 10.1037/pro0000122.
34. Andersson G. Smartphone applications can help in treatment for alcoholism. Evidence-Based Mental Health 2015; 18(1): 27-7. DOI: 10.1136/eb-2014-101927.
35. Glass JE, McKay JR, Gustafson DH, Kornfield R, Rathouz PJ, Mc Tavish FM, et al. Treatment seeking as a mechanism of change in a randomized controlled trial of a mobile health intervention to support recovery from alcohol use disorders. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 77: 57-66. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.03.011.
36. Mellentin AI, Nielsen B, Nielsen AS, Yu F, Stenager E. A randomized controlled study of exposure therapy as aftercare for alcohol use disorder: study protocol. BMC Psychiatry 2016; 16: 112. DOI: 10.1186/s12888-016-0795-8.
37. Wieczorek Ł. Barriers in the access to alcohol treatment in outpatient clinics in urban and rural community. Psychiatr Pol 2017; 51(1): 125-38.
This is an Open Access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), allowing third parties to download and share its works but not commercially purposes or to create derivative works.
Quick links
© 2020 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe