eISSN: 2299-551X
ISSN: 0011-4553
Journal of Stomatology
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3/2020
vol. 73
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Photographic, radiographic, and microscopic assessment of dental implants after simulated heating, burial, and immersion in water

Carolina de Souza Bonetti
1
,
Ana Carolina Taveira Bachur
1
,
Christiano de Oliveira-Santos
1
,
Ricardo Henrique A. da Silva
1
,
Fernanda de C. P. Pires-de-Souza
2

1.
Department of Stomatology, Public Health and Forensic Odontology, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto – University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
2.
Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto – University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
J Stoma 2020; 73, 3: 118-122
Online publish date: 2020/06/30
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Introduction
In complex cases of human identification, such as those with charred, putrefied, and mutilated cadavers as well as teeth, dental materials, and implants, play an essential role because of their highly resistance to postmortem environmental conditions. The present study aimed to analyze photographic, radiographic, and microscopic images of dental implants in three common situations in forensic practice: heating, burial, and water immersion.

Material and methods
Twenty-seven dental implants were installed into nine pig ribs that were sectioned into three fragments and divided into three groups. Each group underwent a different simulation process: heating at 200°C, 400°C, and 600°C for 30 minutes; burial for 30, 60, and 90 days; and immersion in water for 30, 60, and 90 days. Before and after simulation, the specimens were analyzed via photographs, periapical radiographs, and scanning electron microscopy for comparison purposes.

Results
The results demonstrate that there was no significant damage in the dental implant’s structure. On the other hand, the surrounding bone was affected in all groups. Detachment of the implant from the bone was observed in the samples, except in those least exposed to water submersion and heat.

Conclusions
This study confirms the high resistance of dental implants to environmental changes that are commonly found in the forensic practice.

keywords:

dental implants, forensic anthropology, dental radiography, scanning electron microscopy

 
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