eISSN: 1689-3530
ISSN: 0867-4361
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction/Alkoholizm i Narkomania
Current issue Archive Articles in press About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
1/2020
vol. 33
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Original article

Review and analysis of the functionality of mobile applications in the field of alcohol consumption

Michał Wróblewski
1
,
Justyna Iwona Klingemann
2
,
Łukasz Wieczorek
2

1.
Institute of Sociology, Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland
2.
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Studies on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Warsaw, Poland
Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33 (1): 1-18
Online publish date: 2020/06/09
Article file
- AIN-Wroblewski.pdf  [0.50 MB]
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

The increasing popularity of various devices in the Internet of Things (IoT) and the rising demand for mobile phone apps has not failed to affect current medical practice. There are specialised devices and apps available on the market for the treatment of various conditions, and also there are those applied in daily practice dedicated to supporting a healthy lifestyle (e.g. walking distance trackers and smartwatches). This increasingly popular trend for various mHealth solutions is often described as a promising direction in medical development. Indicated are mobile technology potentials like promoting healthy lifestyles and effective health-risk alarms [1], deepening individual motivation to change harmful habits [2], increasing health service availability [3] and improving clinical practice [4].

Also recognised is the positive role of modern technologies in overcoming alcohol abuse related problems. It seems that mHealth solutions can improve the system of addiction treatment by facilitating constant contact with the therapeutic facility in the long term, by overcoming stigma and geographical barriers. Thus, patients may enjoy a stronger connection with the therapeutic institution in the knowledge that their condition is being carefully monitored and they have not been forgotten by the therapist [5, 6]. The mHealth phone apps can be used by people who, for various reasons (limited availability of treatment, time and financial barriers, stigma, lack of possibility to provide childcare), do not seek therapeutic help despite their experienced problems [7, 8]. The article reviews publicly available, free-of-charge telephone apps related to alcohol consumption. Researchers focused their attention on software that helps to reduce the consumption of alcoholic beverages in various ways, analysing it according to its nature, purpose, functionality, popularity and scope of impact.

Material and methods

The analysed data was collected from September to December 2018, with the last update taking place on 13.12.2018. The analysis was conducted using phones with Android and iOS operating systems. The source of apps search were Google Play and AppStore databases. The first treated Android apps and the second iOS. The following keywords were used: drinking, drink, sobriety, alcoholism, alcohol, alcohol addiction. The analysis included 200 apps assigned to pro-drinking (n = 100) and pro-health (n = 100) general categories. The first category includes the 100 most popular apps that, in various forms, encourage people to drink alcohol by facilitating access (e.g. alcohol purchase) or supporting consumption (e.g. drinks recipes). The second category contains the 100 most popular apps that discourage the use of alcohol (e.g. support alcohol-related problem therapy or help reduce consumption) or monitor level of consumption (e.g. alcohol-consumption trackers). Paid apps were excluded from the research, apps that had zero downloads and so-called unpublished apps for testers.

The next stage of the review was to create a typology of apps within each category. The typology was created on the basis of the analysis of app descriptions, which include a short explanation of the functionalities, number of ratings and average rating, approximate number of installations and date of the last update. The apps were classified according to dominant functionality. For example, if monitoring of drinking was the main app feature, it was classified as a tracker app even though some additional information about dependence was provided. Apps with several dominant functionalities were classified as comprehensive.

Results

Below we present our two-category typology of apps that encourage drinking (pro-alcohol apps) and those discouraging alcohol use and supporting the process of coping with excessive alcohol-use problems (pro-health apps). We focus on the latter and present their characteristics.
Pro-drinking apps (n = 100)
• Buying/purchasing alcohol – 4 apps
• Information on alcohol – 5 apps
• Alcohol preparing – 24 apps
• Games – 53 apps
• Drink simulators – 12 apps
• Phone wallpapers – 2 apps
Among the 100 most popular pro-drinking apps, the majority (53%) were games. These are various types of quizzes or challenges, which are supposed to be additional entertainment during alcohol consumption among friends. Another extremely popular group (24%) are apps containing recipes for making alcohol drinks and information on how to prepare alcohol at home (e.g. homemade beer). The third most popular group of apps were drink simulators (12%). They change the screen of a smartphone into a glass or a mug, so the user can pretend to consume alcohol directly from their phone. In the group of 100 most popular apps there were also those containing information about alcohol, e.g. guides to wine and beer types (5%) and apps facilitating the purchase or ordering of alcohol, e.g. internet shops (4%) and phone wallpapers about alcohol (2%).
Pro-health apps (n = 100)
• Educational – 14 apps
• Trackers (problem diagnosis and consumption monitoring) – 26 apps
• Breathalysers (determination of blood alcohol concentration, BAC) – 17 apps
• Overcoming dependence – 17 apps
• Community – 8 apps
• Games – 2 apps
• Comprehensive (combining functionalities from different categories) – 16 apps
Educational: These apps make up 14% of the most popular pro-health category. They provide users with basic information on the harmful effects of alcohol on human health. The main purpose of the apps is education so they do not contain therapeutic information and are not oriented towards user interaction. In fact, you cannot interact with these apps other than by reading their content.

An example of a typical informational app is Alcohol. Its only functionality is to provide the user with information on types of alcohol, the consequences of drinking and risk factors.
Trackers: These are the most popular type of pro-health app (26%). Trackers are primarily used to monitor and reduce the amount of consumed alcohol, and work in a similar way to apps that record users sport activities, reporting on kilometres travelled or calories burned. The name comes from the English word for tracking. In the context of mobile apps or Internet of Things devices, we also talk about self-tracking, i.e. monitoring yourself. Trackers are addressed to all alcohol users. They show how long a user remains sober, how many units of alcohol they have consumed in a period of time. They often have a gamification element (incorporating elements and logic of games into various processes, activities and systems not connected with games) as for a certain sober period the user is rewarded with points, badges or information about achieving a threshold or level (e.g. not drinking for a week, month or year). The result is often shown on an ongoing basis as the app constantly counts down seconds and minutes. Some generate periodic reports and in many the time of staying sober is additionally converted into the money saved to further motivate towards reducing alcohol consumption. These apps include social aspects in various forms, allowing users to share their “results” in social media or to contact other people who follow their drinking habits.

This category includes the apps that use various types of tests to identify alcohol related problems. The common denominator of trackers and apps with diagnostic tools is that they are designed to allow the user initial estimation of their own condition by resolving the test or becoming aware of the amount of alcohol they drink.

Quitzilla is an example of a tracker app that allows to monitor various addictions, determine average weekly expenses or time lost due to a dependence. On the main screen there is a counter that measures every second of abstinence time. If we happen to break abstinence, we can reset the counter and also make a note that will be in future useful information about the circumstances of any relapse. The motivation component are quotations to help maintain resolve and various forms of gamification by point-gaining and the opportunity to reach successive levels of experience. The app shows to what extend users have persevered in sobriety over a specific time e.g. at 15 days of no drinking, users are informed they have achieved 50% of their goal. Another form of gamification is the so-called Trophy Room, where badges for reaching successive levels are on display. The app also informs of minimum, maximum and average abstinence time, which may be shared on social media. Another functionality is so-called Investment. This treats the time saved while not drinking as capital that may be invested in various activities like reading books (we set ourselves the names of these activities and the value of a single investment). Summarising, this app has several widely understood counting functionalities. Also, once the data has been entered (type of dependence, number of days, money or time), it allows users to analyse their condition.

Breathalysers: Pro-health apps include various virtual breathalysers (17%) estimating sobriety levels. The main purpose of these apps is to estimate whether users are sober at a given time by entering units of alcohol consumed and time of consumption. One of the analysed apps included a database of popular drinks alcohol content.

The Alcodroid is an example of the above app type as it allows users to continuously monitor the state of alcohol intoxication and the approximate sobering-up time. When users have a drink, a beer or a glass of wine they can record this and get information on the current level of alcohol in the blood. The app collects this data in the form of a calendar, and also enables users to analyse their drinking style, e.g. determine the maximum daily dose and weekly or monthly average. The data can be presented in the form of a graph. The app allows users to set their own drinking limit, as well as to discover how human behaviour changes after a certain level of alcohol in the blood has been exceeded.

Overcoming dependence: This category includes apps for users with alcohol related problem (17%) and they encourage change in addictive behaviour in a complementary (n = 2) or alternative (n = 15) manner as well as use professional therapy. Most of the apps in this group are based on the AA 12 Steps programme and are mainly informative, that is, they explain AA philosophy and its individual components. The information is presented in the form of texts or audio recordings. This group also includes apps encouraging the use of unconventional methods of dependence treatment like meditation or hypnosis.

An example is the AA Speakers app, which contains audiobooks with recordings from therapeutic workshops, stories of AA community participants or ways of coping with addiction (e.g. a guide on how to get through the first 30 days of non-drinking). In addition, the app contains sounds supporting meditation like rain, a burning fireplace or ocean waves. Users can create their own playlist.

Community: This includes apps designed to establish and maintain contact with people experiencing similar problems (8%). These apps use the classic chat formula (the user can “enter” the theme rooms and talk to people there), or the social medium (the user creates an account, shares photos and sets up statuses). The main function is to assist the user in the sobering-up process and provide support in crisis situations through quick contact with other users going through alcohol-related problems. Several apps also offer contact with a therapist.

An example is Sober Grid – Social Network. The app can be connected to a social media account like Facebook. It is a combination of an internet forum with social media. Users “chat” in groups they choose to join and concurrently it features a timeline structure with photos and descriptions of other users (which users can comment on or like). Here users can not only write a few words, but also set their status as check-in or triggered. “Check-in” signals that everything is fine and users are not thinking about returning to the habit, while “triggered” indicates something is wrong. If we check this status, the app will offer contact with the recovery couch. This app allows users to find each other with its geolocation function and measures the distance between them. It also has built-in tracking and rewarding functions. The latter take the form of daily challenges like reading motivating quotes, marking the check-in status, writing a “thank you letter” and commenting on another user’s status.

Games: Two apps in our sample were classified as games (2%). Sobering Thoughts is designed to create negative associations with alcohol. The user chooses a word he or she associates with a picture presenting alcohol in a negative light. Points are gained for speed of word to picture association. The aim of the second app, Ray’s Night Out alcohol drinking simulator, is to teach the user when to stop drinking. He or she plays the role of a red panda named Ray, who has successive drinks and answers questions about using alcohol. Comprehensive: Sixteen percent of apps with a range of functionalities qualified to this group, supporting users work to change their behaviour with a variety of different techniques. Most included a sobriety tracker to monitor abstinence and share results on social media. Badges are awarded for reaching a certain level of sobriety, daily reminders received and graphs created based on user data. Many also featured motivational (sentences, prayers, proverbs), educational (knowledge about dependence, its manifestations and effects) and social (creating support networks) elements.

The Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) app features a range of functionalities that normally are available as single functions in other apps like trackers, motivational sentences or achievement sharing. Its characteristic feature is personalised information on the health impact of alcohol. The app demonstrates after how many days of non-drinking our nerve cells start to regenerate or when withdrawal symptoms may appear. Sobriety Counter also features a slow-quit mode programme.

Analysis of the available quantitative indicators
In addition to creating a typology of the most popular pro-drinking and pro-health apps, we also conducted a more detailed impact analysis on the basis of indicators available in the Google Play database. Unfortunately, the AppStore database contained too little data. One of the available indicators is the total number of user ratings, reflecting not only the popularity of the app but also its impact. A large number of ratings indicates that the app has aroused interest and users are willing to share their opinions on it. Comparison of ratings totals indicates pro-drinking apps are much more likely to engage users (Fig. 1), while the pro-health app was in a lowly sixth place.

The fact that apps encouraging users to drink alcohol in various ways are more popular than those discouraging it is also demonstrated by the number of downloads (Fig. 2). In our sample, the most frequently downloaded app is Drink Cocktail Real Sim (10,000,000 downloads or more). The app turns a user’s smartphone into a glass with a cocktail, so one can pretend to drink alcohol. Apps containing recipes for making drinks are also very popular (range 5,000,000+). The first pro-health app was only in the third download range (1,000,000 downloads and more).

In the pro-health apps group, most often evaluated are those in the tracker category (Fig. 3), which may be due to their being aimed at all alcohol consumers. They serve not only to maintain abstinence, but also to reduce drinking regardless of the amount of consumption or intensity of the problems experienced. The same is true for alcohol tester apps. However, as can be seen, two out of the three most frequently evaluated pro-health apps belong to the comprehensive group.

Analysis of average user ratings (Fig. 4) reveals that the highest-rated app from the Google Play database is Sobriety Counter Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) from the comprehensive category, which, in addition to the tracker, contains a number of functionalities supporting the coping with alcohol dependence. It is also the third most frequently evaluated app, which means that it is very popular among customers of the Google Play database. The last available indicator is the app download total (Fig. 5), although Google Play provides only ranges of downloads, not the exact number. The most frequently downloaded pro-health app is AlcoDroid Alcohol Tracker (a breathalyser with alcohol monitor function), which has been downloaded to mobile phones over a million times. In the second range (more than half a million downloads) was CleanTime Counter, which is a typical tracker, and in the third range (one hundred thousand downloads) were trackers, breathalysers, educational and comprehensive category. It is worth noting that in the last group there is Quitzilla (the first in the list of the most frequently rated) and Sobriety Counter Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) (the first in the list of the best rated). It may be assumed these apps are very popular among users interested in reducing drinking or quitting.

Discussion

A review of publicly available free telephone apps in the field of alcohol consumption has shown that pro-drinking apps are more popular than the pro-health. They also engage users more and have a greater impact. Similarly, in the review by Cohn et al. [9], apps encouraging drinking constituted 71% of alcohol-related apps available on the market. As in our review, these were entertainment apps (e.g. alcohol games, motor coordination tests and “breathalysers” encouraging users to blow on the phone), instructions on how to prepare alcoholic beverages, apps supporting the purchase of alcohol (e.g. help in finding the nearest bar), information (e.g. presentation of various types of alcohol, advice on hangover cures) and organisational apps (creating a catalogue of favourite wines and beers and places to buy them) [9].

It is worth noting that pro-drinking apps usually place alcohol in a folk context. Game apps “support” the alcohol drinking by offering social games. In turn, simulators give the opportunity to joke about drinking alcohol directly from mobile phones. In addition, there is also a hobby context in which users are supported by information and skills about appropriate consumption of beers, wines or drinks (these are apps in the information and creation category). Alcohol consumption is presented as a practice requiring semi-professional competence and appropriate preparation.

Analysis of apps that in various ways help reduce alcohol consumption leads to several conclusions. Firstly, health-oriented apps are more frequently addressed to alcohol abusers than dependent persons. Therapeutic and comprehensive apps constitute 1/3 of the analysed pro-health category. Their use may contribute to the medicalisation of alcohol consumption in the general population. Thanks to the monitoring of consumption levels and the diagnostic tools built into the apps, alcohol consumption may stop being perceived as a routine practice and instead become accepted as a risky behaviour.

Secondly, trackers and alcohol-habit monitoring functionalities are very popular. The recording of alcohol units consumed on an ongoing basis or the counting of sober days is a common feature of apps devoted to reducing drinking. However, the popularity of alcohol trackers ought to be taken in the broader context of modern quantification practice. The concept of the quantified self (QS) is based on the use of modern technologies to monitor various aspects of functioning from body performance to daily habits. As research shows, health broadly understood as wellbeing care, is an important motivation for engaging in quantification practices related to the use of trackers [10]. The fashion for “self-monitoring” is associated with the growing popularity of mHealth technologies in non-medical (i.e. not institutionalised medicine) contexts and the healthy lifestyle trend [11, 12].

Apps that record moments of alcohol consumption and analyse time trends individualise alcohol problems and thus assign responsibility to the user. This gives the individual a sense of control over his or her behaviour and may increase the motivation to break away from harmful behaviours. On the other hand, an important element of these apps is their social function. Almost every tracker (and many apps in other categories) allows users to share their achievements with others. Many apps also have a built-in chat function or a structure similar to the Facebook or Twitter timeline. Thus, trackers are also a tool for creating virtual communities, connected with the desire to reduce alcohol consumption.

Another element that seems to always accompany the pro-health apps we have examined is gamification. Almost every tracker allows users to collect points, gain levels of sobriety or engage in some form of competition. The literature assumes that the elements of gamification in the context of mHealth are a scoreboard (a place where users can share their results), levels and digital rewards (in the form of badges or points), real-world rewards, competition and social pressure (related to comparing users results) [13]. In the case of the pro-health apps we studied, the most common manifestations of gamification were the existence of digital rewards and levels, which the user achieved after persevering in sobriety for a certain number of days or social pressure in the form of social functions. A good example is the Polish app Alky Recovery, which even contains an option directly called “gamification”. The user collects points for forum participation and regularly keeping an alcohol craving diary. In turn, users move up levels (in the form of successive badges) by being sober for a certain amount of time and by earning points for posting in the chat and using the diary. The popularity of the gamification elements can be explained by the pleasure the user derives from engaging in activities based on competition, gaining achievements or setting goals [11]. Gamification makes activities that are sometimes perceived as boring and repetitive more exciting and thus more engaging [14]. There is also a socialising and educational potential as the user is encouraged to communicate with others and can more easily learn about the mechanisms of certain processes or phenomena [15].

Edwards et al. link the gamification elements present in mHealth apps to psychological practice with the purpose of effective altering behaviour [16]. In their review of the apps, the most common elements of gamification, which can also be considered as behavioural change techniques, were among others, the opportunity to compare users’ results and awards. In turn, Johnson et al. place gamification in the context of self-determination theory, which distinguishes between internal and external motivation [17]. From the perspective of pro-health behaviours, internal motivation is crucial, as it stimulates action for their own sake and on one’s own initiative rather than acting under the influence of external factors. According to the researchers, gamification may increase the internal motivation and thus the chance of supporting the desired behaviour pattern. There are studies show not only the potential of gamification, but also its real, positive impact on health-related activities. In the study by Cafazzo et al. [18], the introduction of the gamification element (scoring and rewarding) helped diabetic patients to control their glucose levels more successfully. In Dennis and O’Toole’s studies [19], cognitive bias modification (CBM) with elements of gamification proved to reduce anxiety symptoms more effectively among respondents than in a control group where CBM without gamification was applied. The potential of gamification was also studied in the context of excessive alcohol consumption. Boyle et al. [20] showed that by introducing gamification elements (points, avatars, randomisation), the effectiveness of one of the tools used to correct the perception of alcohol consumption was increased. In turn, Cook et al. [21] presented the results of research on the effectiveness of the social campaign addressed to American sailors, the purpose of which was to reduce incidents related to excessive drinking. One of the elements was a mobile game designed to raise awareness of the consequences of risky drinking. In addition to elements typical of classic games (narration, role-playing), the app introduced the possibility of collecting points and sharing results.

Conclusions

The great popularity of pro-drinking apps raises questions about their role in contributing to the spread of harmful habits. Apps of this type may indeed not be an insignificant spur to alcohol consumption, but due to their ease of use or their aforementioned folk character, they may in fact encourage consumption. Drinking is presented as an innocent playful practice, without negative consequences.

Although pro-drinking apps are more popular than their pro-health equivalents, analysis of the latter, taking into account their nature, purpose, functionality, popularity and scope of impact, has shown their potential as a tool for altering risk behaviour. Both individualistic and pro-social elements of pro-health apps may prove to be important tools for reducing alcohol consumption. They encourage reflective management of one’s own habits, allow one to take responsibility for one’s own behaviour and encourage self-control. At the same time, entering a community of other users can raise awareness of one’s own problem and encourage one to seek professional help.

The limitations of this type of app are also worth emphasising. The success of their use depends largely on the determination of the user. Users can quickly get bored of apps therefore stop using them. It would therefore seems clear that apps cannot fully replace the therapeutic process. Even the best constructed app is never going to be the only solution to alcohol-related problems.

Conflict of interest

None declared. Financial support The project “Use of new technologies in the process of recovering from addiction (mWSPARCIE 2018-2020)” is financed by the State Agency for the Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems as part of the implementation of the National Health Programme 2016-2020 (agreement 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Ethics

The work described in this article has been carried out in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) on medical research involving human subjects, Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals and the ethical principles defined in the Farmington Consensus of 1997.

References

1. Catford J. The new social learning: connect better for better health. Health Promotion International 2011; 26(2): 133-5.
2. Laakso EL, Armstrong K, Usher W. Cyber-management of people with chronic disease: a potential solution to eHealth challenges. Health Education Journal 2011; 5(3): 1-8.
3. Piette JD, Lun KC, Moura LA Jr, Fraser SFH, Mecheal PN, Powell J, et al. Impacts of e-health on the outcomes of care in low-and middle-income countries: where do we go from here? Bull World Health Organ 2012; 90: 365-72.
4. Ganasegeran K, Renganathan P, Rashid A, Al-Dubai SAR. The m-Health revolution: exploring perceived benefits of WhatsApp use in clinical practice. Int J Med Inform 2017; 97: 145-51.
5. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
6. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an evidence-based, theoretically informed, mobile technology-based system to improve outcomes for people in recovery for alcohol dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111.
7. Hoeppner BB, Schick MR, Kelly LM, Hoeppner SS, Bergman B, Kelly JF. There is an app for that – or is there? A content analysis of publicly available smartphone apps for managing alcohol use. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 82: 67-73.
8. Ramsey AT. Integration of technology-based behavioral health interventions in substance abuse and addiction services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80.
9. Cohn AM, Hunter-Reel D, Hagman BT, Mitchell J. Promoting behavior change from alcohol use through mobile technology: the future of ecological momentary assessment. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2011; 35(12): 2209-15.
10. Choe EK, Lee NB, Lee B, Pratt W, Kientz JA. Understanding quantified-selfers’ practices in collecting and exploring personal data. In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Toronto: ACM; 2014; p. 1143-52.
11. Lupton D. The Quantified Self. Cambridge: Polity; 2016.
12. Wróblewski M. Nowe szaty healthismu. Self-tracking, neoliberalizm i kapitalizm kognitywny. Folia Sociologica 2016; 58: 7-25.
13. Lister C, West JH, Cannon B, Sax T, Brodegard D. Just a fad? Gamification in health and fitness apps. JMIR Serious Games 2014; 2: e9. DOI: 10.2196/games.3413.
14. Maturo A. Doing Things with Numbers. The quantified self and the gamification of health. Eä Journal 2015; 7(1): 87-105.
15. Pereira P, Duarte E, Rebero F, Noriega P. A Review of gamification for health-related contexts. In: Marcus A (ed.). Design, User Experience and Usability, Part II. Springer; 2014, p. 742-53.
16. Edwards EA, Lumsden J, Rivas C, Steed L, Edwards LA, Thiyagarajan A, et al. Gamification for health promotion: systematic review of behaviour change techniques in smartphone app. BMJ Open 2016; 6: e012447. DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012447.
17. Johnson D, Deterding S, Kuhn KA, Staneva A, Stoyanov S, Hides L. Gamification for health and wellbeing: a systematic review of the literature. Internet Interv 2016; 6: 89-106.
18. Caffazo JA, Casselman M, Hamming N, Katzman DK, Palmert MR. Design of an mHealth app for the self-management of adolescent type 1 diabetes: a pilot study. J Med Internet Res 2012; 14(3): e70. DOI: 0.2196/jmir.2058.
19. Dennis TA, O’Toole L. Mental health on the go: effects of a gamified attention bias modification mobile application in trait anxious adults. Clin Psychol Sci 2014; 2(5): 576-90.
20. Boyle SC, Earle AM, LaBrie JW, Smith DJ. PNF 2.0? Initial evidence that gamification can increase the efficacy of brief, web-based personalized normative feedback alcohol interventions. Addict Behav 2017; 67: 8-17.
21. Cook K, Brennan E, Colleen G, Kennard T. „Keep what you’ve earned”: encouraging sailors to drink responsibly. In: Marcus A (ed.). Design, User Experience and Usability, Part II. Springer; 2014, p. 575-86.

Wprowadzenie

Rosnąca popularność urządzeń z zakresu internetu rzeczy (IoT) i powiększający się rynek aplikacji telefonicznych nie pozostaje bez wpływu na współczesną medycynę. Na rynku są dostępne urządzenia i aplikacje specjalnie przeznaczone do leczenia różnych schorzeń, a także takie, które są wykorzystywane w codziennych, nastawionych na utrzymanie zdrowego trybu życia praktykach (np. krokomierze, inteligentne zegarki). Ten trend upowszechniania się różnych rozwiązań z zakresu mZdrowia jest często opisywany jako obiecujący kierunek rozwoju medycyny. Wskazuje się na takie potencjały technologii mobilnych, jak promowanie zdrowego trybu życia i skuteczne alarmowanie o ryzyku związanym z zagrożeniami dla zdrowia [1], pogłębianie indywidualnej motywacji do zmiany szkodliwych nawyków [2], poszerzanie dostępu do usług medycznych [3] i usprawnienie praktyki klinicznej [4].

Dostrzega się również pozytywną rolę nowoczesnych technologii w pokonywaniu problemów wynikających z nadużywania alkoholu. Wydaje się, że rozwiązania z zakresu mZdrowia mogą usprawnić system lecznictwa uzależnień przez ułatwienie utrzymywania w dłuższym czasie stałego kontaktu z placówką terapeutyczną, przezwyciężanie barier geograficznych i związanych ze stygmatyzacją. Dzięki tym narzędziom pacjenci mogą czuć silniejszą łączność z placówką terapeutyczną i mieć poczucie, że ich choroba jest starannie monitorowana, a oni sami nie zostali zapomniani przez terapeutę [5, 6]. Po aplikacje telefoniczne z zakresu mZdrowia mogą sięgnąć osoby, które z różnych powodów (ograniczona dostępność leczenia, bariery czasowe i finansowe, stygmatyzacja, brak możliwości zapewnienia opieki nad dzieckiem) nie szukają pomocy terapeutycznej pomimo doświadczanych problemów [7, 8].

W artykule przestawiono przegląd ogólnodostępnych i bezpłatnych aplikacji telefonicznych związanych z konsumpcją alkoholu. Badacze skoncentrowali uwagę na aplikacjach, które w różny sposób pomagają ograniczyć konsumpcję napojów alkoholowych, analizując je ze względu na ich charakter, cel, funkcjonalności, popularność i zakres oddziaływania.

Materiał i metody

Dane zbierano od września do grudnia 2018 r., ostatnia aktualizacja bazy miała miejsce 13 grudnia 2018 r. Analizę prowadzono z użyciem telefonów wyposażonych w systemy operacyjne Android oraz iOS. Źródłem wyszukiwania aplikacji były bazy Google Play oraz AppStore. W pierwszej dostępne są aplikacje działające w systemie Android, w drugiej natomiast – w systemie iOS. Wykorzystano następujące słowa kluczowe: drinking, drink, sobriety, alcoholism, alcohol, alcohol addiction.

Do analizy włączono 200 aplikacji przyporządkowanych do dwóch ogólnych kategorii: proalkoholowej (n = 100) i prozdrowotnej (n = 100). Pierwsza kategoria zawiera 100 najpopularniejszych aplikacji, które w różnej formie zachęcają do picia alkoholu przez ułatwianie dostępu (np. kupna alkoholu) czy też wspomaganie konsumpcji (np. podawanie przepisów na drinki). Druga kategoria zawiera 100 najpopularniejszych aplikacji, które zniechęcają do używania alkoholu (np. wspomagają terapię problemów alkoholowych lub pomagają ograniczyć spożycie) bądź monitorują poziom jego konsumpcji (np. trackery śledzące liczbę wypitych drinków). Z wyszukiwania wykluczono aplikacje płatne, z zerową liczbą ściągnięć oraz tzw. aplikacje nieopublikowane, przeznaczone dla testerów.

Kolejnym etapem przeglądu było stworzenie typologii aplikacji w ramach poszczególnych kategorii. Typologię tworzono na podstawie analizy opisów aplikacji, które zawierają: krótki opis funkcjonalności, liczbę i średnią ocen użytkowników, przybliżoną liczbę instalacji i datę ostatniej aktualizacji. Aplikacje klasyfikowano według dominującej funkcjonalności. Dla przykładu, jeżeli monitorowanie picia stanowiło główną cechę aplikacji, była ona klasyfikowana jako aplikacja typu tracker, nawet jeśli zawierała dodatkowo informacje na temat uzależnienia. Aplikacje, które miały kilka dominujących funkcjonalności, klasyfikowano jako aplikacje kompleksowe.

Wyniki

Poniżej prezentujemy stworzoną przez nas typologię aplikacji w dwóch kategoriach – aplikacji zachęcających do picia (aplikacje proalkoholowe) oraz aplikacji zniechęcających do używania alkoholu i wspomagających proces radzenia sobie z problemami wynikającymi z nadmiernej konsumpcji alkoholu (aplikacje prozdrowotne). Koncentrujemy się na tych ostatnich i przedstawiamy ich charakterystykę.
Aplikacje proalkoholowe (n = 100)
• Kupowanie/zamawianie alkoholu – 4 aplikacje
• Informacje na temat alkoholu – 5 aplikacji
• Wytwarzanie alkoholu – 24 aplikacje
• Gry – 53 aplikacje
• Symulatory drinków – 12 aplikacji
• Tapety na telefon – 2 aplikacje
Wśród 100 najpopularniejszych aplikacji proalkoholowych większość (53%) stanowiły gry. Są to różnego rodzaju quizy czy wyzwania, które mają w założeniu być dodatkową rozrywką podczas konsumpcji alkoholu w gronie znajomych. Kolejną niezwykle popularną grupą (24%) są aplikacje zawierające przepisy na sporządzanie drinków alkoholowych oraz informacje, jak wytwarzać alkohol w domu (np. piwo domowej roboty). Trzecią pod względem popularności grupą aplikacji były symulatory drinków (12%). Zmieniają one ekran smartfona w szklankę bądź kufel, dzięki czemu użytkownik może udawać, że spożywa alkohol wprost ze swojego telefonu. W grupie 100 najpopularniejszych aplikacji znalazły się też aplikacje zawierające informacje na temat alkoholu, np. przewodniki po gatunkach wina i piwa (5%), aplikacje ułatwiające kupowanie lub zamawianie alkoholu, np. sklepy internetowe (4%), oraz tapety na telefon o tematyce alkoholowej (2%).
Aplikacje prozdrowotne (n =100)
• Edukacyjne – 14 aplikacji
• Trackery (diagnoza problemu i monitorowanie konsumpcji) – 26 aplikacji
• Alkomaty (określanie poziomu alkoholu we krwi, BAC) – 17 aplikacji
• Przezwyciężanie uzależnienia – 17 aplikacji
• Społecznościowe – 8 aplikacji
• Gry – 2 aplikacje
• Kompleksowe (łączące funkcjonalności z różnych kategorii) – 16 aplikacji
Edukacyjne: Aplikacje tej kategorii stanowią 14% najpopularniejszych aplikacji prozdrowotnych. Przekazują użytkownikom podstawowe informacje dotyczące szkodliwego wpływu alkoholu na zdrowie człowieka. W tej grupie znalazły się aplikacje, których głównym celem jest edukacja – nie zawierają one informacji na temat terapii, nie są też nastawione na interakcję z użytkownikiem. Właściwie nie można korzystać z tych aplikacji inaczej, niż czytając zawarte w nich treści.

Przykładem aplikacji typowo informacyjnej jest Alkohol. Jej jedyna funkcjonalność to przekazywanie użytkownikowi wiedzy o rodzajach alkoholu, konsekwencjach picia i czynnikach ryzyka. Trackery: Aplikacje z tej kategorii są najpopularniejszym rodzajem aplikacji prozdrowotnych (26%). Trackery służą przede wszystkim do monitorowania wypijanego alkoholu i ograniczania jego ilości. Działają podobnie jak aplikacje rejestrujące aktywności sportowe zbierające dane o przebiegniętych kilometrach czy spalonych kaloriach. Nazwa pochodzi od angielskiego słowa oznaczającego śledzenie. W kontekście aplikacji mobilnych czy urządzeń z zakresu internetu rzeczy mówi się również o zjawisku self-tracking, czyli monitorowaniu samego siebie. Trackery kierowane są do wszystkich osób spożywających alkohol. Pokazują, przez jaki czas użytkownik pozostaje trzeźwy, ile porcji alkoholu spożył i w jakim czasie. Często zawierają element gamifikacji, co polega na włączaniu elementów i logiki gier do różnych procesów, aktywności oraz systemów niezwiązanych z grami (w języku polskim czasem używa się niezbyt fortunnego określenia „grywalizacja”) – za określony czas niepicia użytkownik jest nagradzany punktami, odznakami czy informacją o przekroczeniu progu bądź poziomu (np. niepicie przez tydzień, miesiąc, rok). Wynik często pokazywany jest na bieżąco – aplikacja odlicza bezustannie sekundy i minuty. W niektórych z nich możliwe jest tworzenie raportów okresowych, w wielu dodatkowo przelicza się czas pozostawania w trzeźwości na zaoszczędzone w ten sposób pieniądze, by jeszcze bardziej zmotywować do ograniczenia spożywania alkoholu. W tych aplikacjach występuje element społecznościowy i to w różnych formach. Pozwala to na dzielenie się swoimi „wynikami” w mediach społecznościowych bądź na kontaktowanie z innymi osobami śledzącymi swoje nawyki alkoholowe. W tej kategorii umieściliśmy również aplikacje wykorzystujące różnego rodzaju testy w celu rozpoznania u siebie problemu z alkoholem. Wspólnym mianownikiem trackerów i aplikacji zawierających narzędzia diagnostyczne jest to, że mają za zadanie umożliwić użytkownikowi wstępne oszacowanie własnego stanu (przez rozwiązanie testu lub uświadomienie sobie ilości wypijanego alkoholu).

Przykładem aplikacji typu tracker jest aplikacja Quitzilla. Pozwala ona na monitorowanie różnych uzależnień, określenie średnich tygodniowych wydatków czy czasu straconego na skutek uzależnienia. Na ekranie głównym widzimy licznik, który odmierza co do sekundy czas abstynencji. Jeżeli zdarzy nam się przerwać abstynencję, możemy nie tylko zresetować licznik, ale również zrobić notatkę, która będzie użyteczna w przyszłości jako informacja o okolicznościach, w jakich dochodzi do nawrotu. Motywowanie opiera się na codziennym wyświetlaniu cytatów, które mają pomóc w utrzymaniu postanowień, oraz na różnych formach gamifikacji przez zdobywanie punktów i możliwość osiągania kolejnych poziomów doświadczenia. Aplikacja pokazuje, w jakim stopniu wytrwaliśmy w abstynencji w określonym czasie, np. jeżeli nie pijemy od 15 dni, dostajemy informację, że osiągnęliśmy cel w 50%. Inną formą gamifikacji jest tzw. Pokój Trofeów, w którym umieszczone są odznaki za zdobycie kolejnych poziomów. Aplikacja pozwala też na poznanie minimalnego, maksymalnego i średniego czasu abstynencji oraz upowszechnienie wyniku w mediach społecznościowych. Kolejną funkcjonalnością są tzw. Inwestycje: aplikacja traktuje czas zaoszczędzony na niepiciu jako kapitał możliwy do zainwestowania w różne czynności, np. czytanie książek (sami ustawiamy nazwy tych czynności i wartość pojedynczej inwestycji). Podsumowując, ta aplikacja ma kilka funkcjonalności, które sprowadzają się do szeroko rozumianego liczenia. Umożliwia również, po wprowadzeniu danych (rodzaj uzależnienia, liczba dni, ilość pieniędzy czy czasu), analizowanie swojego stanu.

Alkomaty: Za aplikacje prozdrowotne uznaliśmy wszelkiego rodzaju wirtualne alkomaty (17%), które pozwalają na szacunkowe określenie poziomu trzeźwości. Główny cel tych aplikacji to oszacowanie, przez wpisywanie wypitych jednostek i czasu spożycia, czy jest się w danym momencie trzeźwym. Jedna z analizowanych aplikacji zawierała bazę zawartości alkoholu w najpopularniejszych drinkach.

Przykładem jest aplikacja Alcodroid. Pozwala na bieżąco monitorować stan upojenia alkoholowego i przybliżony czas wytrzeźwienia. Gdy wypijemy drinka, piwo czy kieliszek wina, możemy każdorazowo zanotować ten fakt w aplikacji i uzyskać informację na temat aktualnego poziomu alkoholu we krwi. Aplikacja zbiera te dane w formie kalendarza, a także umożliwia przeprowadzanie analizy naszego stylu picia, np. określenie maksymalnej dziennej dawki, średniej dla tygodnia czy miesiąca. Dane można przedstawiać w formie wykresu. Aplikacja pozwala ustawić własny limit picia, a także dowiedzieć się, jak zmienia się zachowanie człowieka po przekroczeniu określonego poziomu alkoholu we krwi.

Przezwyciężanie uzależnienia: W tej kategorii znalazły się aplikacje skierowane do osób z problemem alkoholowym (17%), które zachęcają do zmiany zachowania nałogowego w sposób komplementarny (n = 2) lub alternatywny (n = 15) i do korzystania z terapii prowadzonej przez profesjonalistę. Podstawę większości aplikacji w tej grupie stanowi program 12 Kroków AA; mają one charakter głównie informacyjny – zapoznają z filozofią AA i wyjaśniają jej poszczególne komponenty. Wiedza jest prezentowana w formie tekstów lub nagrań audio. Do tej grupy włączono również aplikacje zachęcające do korzystania z niekonwencjonalnych metod leczenia uzależnienia, takich jak medytacja czy hipnoza.

Przykładem jest aplikacja AA Speakers zawierająca audiobooki – nagrania z warsztatów terapeutycznych, historie uczestników wspólnoty AA czy sposoby radzenia sobie z nałogiem (np. przewodnik, jak przejść przez pierwsze 30 dni niepicia). Dodatkowo aplikacja zawiera dźwięki umożliwiające medytację, np. deszcz, palące się ognisko, fale oceanu. Użytkownik może układać sobie własną playlistę.

Społecznościowe: Kategoria ta objęła aplikacje, w których główną funkcjonalnością było nawiązywanie i podtrzymywanie relacji z osobami doświadczającymi podobnych problemów (8%). Te aplikacje wykorzystują formułę klasycznego czata (użytkownik może „wchodzić” do pokojów tematycznych i rozmawiać ze znajdującymi się tam osobami) bądź medium społecznościowego (użytkownik tworzy swoje konto, dzieli się zdjęciami, ustawia statusy). Ich główną funkcją jest wspomaganie użytkownika w trzeźwieniu i pomoc w kryzysowych sytuacjach przez szybki kontakt z innymi osobami zmagającymi się z problemem alkoholowym. Kilka z nich oferuje również kontakt z terapeutą.

Przykładem takiej aplikacji jest Sober Grid – Social Network. Aplikację można połączyć z kontem w mediach społecznościowych, np. na Facebooku. Jest ona połączeniem forum internetowego z mediami społecznościowymi. Pozwala na „czatowanie” w wybranych przez użytkownika grupach, ale jednocześnie zawiera strukturę w rodzaju osi czasu ze zdjęciami i opisami innych użytkowników (które można komentować czy polubić). Mamy tutaj możliwość nie tylko napisania kilku słów, lecz także ustawienia statusu check-in albo triggered. Ten pierwszy pokazuje innym, że wszystko u nas w porządku i nie myślimy o powrocie do nałogu, ten drugi natomiast sygnalizuje, że coś jest nie tak. Jeżeli zaznaczymy ten status, aplikacja zaproponuje nam kontakt z recovery couch (z terapeutą). Dzięki aplikacji (i funkcji geolokalizacji) możemy znaleźć innych użytkowników – aplikacja pokazuje, jak daleko się od nas znajdują. Ma również wbudowane funkcje śledzenia i gratyfikacyjne. Te ostatnie przyjmują formę codziennych wyzwań: przeczytania motywującego cytatu, zaznaczenia statusu check-in, napisania „listy wdzięczności”, skomentowania statusu innego użytkownika. Gry: Dwie aplikacje w naszej próbie zaklasyfikowaliśmy jako gry (2%). Jedną z nich jest Sobering Thoughts, która ma za zadanie stworzyć negatywne skojarzenia z alkoholem. Użytkownik wybiera słowo, które kojarzy mu się z obrazkiem przedstawiającym w negatywnym świetle picie alkoholu. Im szybciej to zrobi, tym więcej dostaje punktów. Celem drugiej – Ray’s Night Out – symulatora picia alkoholu, jest nauczenie użytkownika, kiedy należy przestać pić. Wciela się on w czerwoną pandę o imieniu Ray, która pije kolejne drinki i odpowiada na pytania dotyczące spożywania alkoholu.

Kompleksowe: Do tej grupy zakwalifikowano 16% aplikacji. Miały one szereg funkcjonalności i zachęcały użytkowników do zmiany zachowania przy wykorzystaniu różnych technik. Większość z nich zawierała trackera trzeźwości umożliwiającego monitorowanie abstynencji i dzielenie się wynikami w mediach społecznościowych, uzyskiwanie odznak za osiągnięcie określonego poziomu trzeźwości, otrzymywanie codziennych przypomnień czy tworzenie wykresów na podstawie danych użytkownika. Wiele z nich posiadało również element motywacyjny (sentencje, modlitwy, przysłowia), edukacyjny (wiedza o uzależnieniu, jego przejawach i skutkach) oraz społecznościowy (tworzenie sieci wsparcia).

Przykładem jest aplikacja Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit). Zawiera wiele funkcjonalności, które pojedynczo występują w innych aplikacjach: trackery, sentencje motywacyjne, udostępnianie osiągnięć. Jej cechą charakterystyczną jest spersonalizowane przekazywanie informacji na temat wpływu alkoholu na nasze zdrowie. Aplikacja pokazuje, po ilu dniach niepicia nasze komórki nerwowe zaczną się regenerować albo kiedy pojawią się symptomy odstawienia. Sobriety Counter umożliwia również stworzenie programu stopniowego wychodzenia z nałogu (slow mode).

Analiza dostępnych wskaźników ilościowych
Poza stworzeniem typologii najpopularniejszych aplikacji proalkoholowych i prozdrowotnych przeprowadziliśmy też bardziej szczegółową analizę ich wpływu oraz oddziaływania na podstawie wskaźników dostępnych w bazie Google Play. Niestety baza AppStore zawierała zbyt mało danych. Jednym z dostępnych wskaźników jest liczba ocen użytkowników – ten wskaźnik stanowi nie tylko odzwierciedlenie popularności danej aplikacji, lecz także jej oddziaływania. Duża liczba ocen świadczy o tym, że aplikacja wzbudziła zainteresowanie, a użytkownicy są chętni do dzielenia się opiniami na jej temat. Jak wynika z porównania liczby ocen, aplikacje proalkoholowe znacznie częściej angażują użytkowników (ryc. 1). Aplikacja prozdrowotna znalazła się dopiero na szóstym miejscu.

O tym, że aplikacje na różne sposoby zachęcające do picia alkoholu są bardziej popularne niż te zniechęcające świadczy również liczba pobrań (ryc. 2). W naszej próbie najczęściej ściągana aplikacja to Drink Cocktail Real Sim (przedział 10 000 000 pobrań i więcej). Zmienia ona telefon w szklankę z koktajlem, można zatem za pomocą smartfonu udawać, że pije się alkohol. Dużą popularnością (przedział 5 000 000+) cieszą się także aplikacje zawierające przepisy na sporządzanie drinków. Pierwsza aplikacja prozdrowotna znalazła się dopiero w trzecim przedziale (1 000 000 pobrań i więcej).

W grupie aplikacji prozdrowotnych najczęściej oceniane są te z kategorii tracker (ryc. 3). Może się to wiązać z faktem, że są skierowane do wszystkich konsumentów alkoholu. Służą nie tylko utrzymywaniu abstynencji, ale również ograniczaniu picia bez względu na wielkość konsumpcji czy nasilenie doświadczanych problemów. Podobnie jest z aplikacjami typu alkomaty. Jak jednak widać, dwie z trzech najczęściej ocenianych aplikacji prozdrowotnych należą do grupy kompleksowych.

Analiza średniej wysokości ocen użytkowników (ryc. 4) pokazuje, że najwyżej ocenianą aplikacją z bazy Google Play jest Sobriety Counter Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) z kategorii kompleksowych, która oprócz trackera zawiera szereg funkcjonalności wspomagających radzenie sobie z uzależnieniem od alkoholu. Jest również trzecią najczęściej ocenianą aplikacją, co oznacza, że cieszy się dużą popularnością wśród klientów bazy Google Play.

Ostatni dostępny wskaźnik stanowi liczba pobrań aplikacji (ryc. 5), choć baza Google Play nie udostępnia dokładnej liczby pobrań, a jedynie przedziały. Najczęściej pobieraną wśród aplikacji prozdrowotnych jest AlcoDroid Alcohol Tracker (alkomat z funkcją monitorowania picia), która została pobrana na telefony komórkowe ponad milion razy. W drugim przedziale (ponad pół miliona razy) znalazła się aplikacja CleanTime Counter, będąca typowym trackerem, w trzecim zaś (sto tysięcy razy) – aplikacje z kategorii: trackery, alkomaty, edukacyjne, kompleksowe. Warto zauważyć, że w ostatniej grupie znajdują się aplikacje Quitzilla (pierwsza w zestawieniu najczęściej ocenianych) i Sobriety Counter Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) (pierwsza w zestawieniu najlepiej ocenianych). Jak można sądzić, te aplikacje cieszą się dużą popularnością wśród użytkowników zainteresowanych ograniczaniem lub zaprzestaniem picia.

Omówienie

Przegląd ogólnodostępnych i bezpłatnych aplikacji telefonicznych związanych z konsumpcją alkoholu pokazał, że aplikacje proalkoholowe cieszą się większą popularnością niż prozdrowotne, bardziej angażują użytkowników i w większym stopniu na nich oddziałują. Podobnie w przeglądzie autorstwa Cohn i wsp. [9] aplikacje zachęcające do picia stanowiły 71% dostępnych na rynku aplikacji związanych z konsumpcją alkoholu. Tak jak w naszym przeglądzie były to aplikacje rozrywkowe (m.in. gry alkoholowe, testy koordynacji ruchowej, „alkomaty” zachęcające do dmuchnięcia w telefon), instrukcje dotyczące przygotowywania drinków alkoholowych, aplikacje wspomagające zakup alkoholu (np. pomoc w znalezieniu najbliższego baru), aplikacje informacyjne (np. prezentacja różnych typów alkoholi, porady jak wyleczyć „kaca”) oraz organizacyjne (tworzenie katalogu ulubionych win i piw oraz miejsc, gdzie można je kupić) [9]. Warto zauważyć, że aplikacje proalkoholowe umieszczają alkohol najczęściej w kontekście ludycznym. Aplikacje typu gry „wspomagają” picie alkoholu przez oferowanie zabaw towarzyskich. Z kolei symulatory dają okazję do robienia żartów z picia alkoholu wprost z telefonu. Ponadto występuje tu również kontekst hobbystyczny, w którym użytkownicy dostają wsparcie w postaci wiedzy i umiejętności odpowiedniego spożywania piwa, wina czy drinków (są to aplikacje z kategorii informacje i wytwarzanie). Konsumpcja alkoholu jest przedstawiana jako praktyka wymagająca półprofesjonalnych kompetencji oraz odpowiedniego przygotowania.

Analiza aplikacji, które w różny sposób pomagają ograniczyć konsumpcję napojów alkoholowych, skłania do kilku wniosków. Po pierwsze, aplikacje prozdrowotne są częściej kierowane do osób nadużywających alkoholu niż do uzależnionych. Przypomnijmy, że aplikacje terapeutyczne i kompleksowe stanowią 1/3 wszystkich analizowanych aplikacji prozdrowotnych. Korzystanie z nich może prowadzić do medykalizacji konsumpcji alkoholu w populacji generalnej. Dzięki monitorowaniu poziomu konsumpcji i wbudowanym w aplikacje narzędziom diagnozującym spożywanie alkoholu może przestać być postrzegane jako rutynowa praktyka, a raczej jako zachowanie ryzykowne.

Po drugie, trackery i funkcjonalności pozwalające na monitorowanie nawyków alkoholowych cieszą się dużą popularnością. Możliwość bieżącego rejestrowania spożywanych jednostek alkoholu lub liczenia dni trzeźwych jest często występującą funkcjonalnością aplikacji mających na celu ograniczenie picia. Nie sposób jednak nie umieścić popularności trackerów alkoholowych w szerszym kontekście, związanym ze współczesnymi praktykami kwantyfikacyjnymi. Koncepcja policzalnego ja (QS) polega na wykorzystaniu nowoczesnych technologii do monitorowania różnych aspektów funkcjonowania – od wydolności organizmu po codzienne nawyki. Jak pokazują badania, zdrowie – rozumiane szeroko jako dbanie o dobrostan – jest ważną motywacją kryjącą się za angażowaniem się w praktyki kwantyfikacyjne związane z wykorzystywaniem trackerów [10]. Moda na „monitorowanie siebie” wiąże się z rosnącą popularnością technologii z zakresu mZdrowia w pozamedycznych (tzn. niezwiązanych z instytucjonalizowaną medycyną) kontekstach i z modą na prowadzenie zdrowego trybu życia [11, 12].

Aplikacje umożliwiające zapisywanie momentów konsumpcji alkoholu i analizowanie trendów czasowych indywidualizują problemy alkoholowe, a więc przypisują odpowiedzialność za nie użytkownikowi. Daje to jednostce poczucie kontroli nad swoim zachowaniem i może zwiększać motywację do zerwania z zachowaniami szkodliwymi dla zdrowia. Z drugiej strony, ważnym elementem tych aplikacji są funkcje społecznościowe. Niemal każdy tracker (a także wiele aplikacji z innych kategorii) pozwala na dzielenie się swoimi osiągnięciami z innymi użytkownikami. Dużo aplikacji ma ponadto wbudowany czat lub strukturę podobną do charakterystycznej dla Facebooka czy Twittera osi czasu. Tym samym trackery są też narzędziem tworzenia wirtualnych wspólnot związanych z chęcią ograniczenia spożycia alkoholu.

Innym elementem, który nieodłącznie towarzyszy badanym przez nas aplikacjom prozdrowotnym, jest gamifikacja. Niemal każdy tracker pozwala na zbieranie punktów, zdobywanie poziomów trzeźwości czy konkurowanie z innymi. W literaturze przyjmuje się, że elementami gamifikacji w kontekście mZdrowia są: tablica wyników (miejsce, na którym użytkownicy mogą dzielić się swoimi wynikami), poziomy i nagrody w postaci cyfrowej (w formie odznak czy punktów), nagrody w świecie realnym, konkurencja, presja społeczna (związana z porównywaniem swoich wyników z wynikami innych) [13]. W przypadku badanych przez nas aplikacji prozdrowotnych najczęstszymi przejawami gamifikacji było istnienie nagród cyfrowych i poziomów, które użytkownik osiągał po wytrwaniu w trzeźwości przez określoną liczbę dni, czy presja społeczna w formie funkcji społecznościowych. Dobrym przykładem jest polska aplikacja Alky Recovery, która zawiera nawet opcję wprost nazwaną „grywalizacja”. Użytkownik zbiera punkty za udzielanie się na forum i regularne wypełnianie dzienniczka głodu alkoholowego. Z kolei poziomy (w formie kolejno uzyskiwanych odznaczeń) osiąga przez bycie trzeźwym przez określony czas oraz zdobycie punktów za pisanie na czacie i używanie dzienniczka. Popularność elementów gamifikacji można tłumaczyć przyjemnością, jaką użytkownik czerpie z angażowania się w aktywności oparte na konkurencji, zdobywaniu osiągnięć czy wyznaczaniu sobie celów [11]. Gamifikacja sprawia, że czynności, które bywają postrzegane jako nudne i powtarzalne, stają się bardziej ekscytujące, a tym samym bardziej angażujące [14]. Ma ona również potencjał uspołeczniający oraz edukacyjny, ponieważ użytkownik jest nakłaniany do komunikowania się z innymi i może z większą łatwością poznać mechanizmy pewnych procesów czy zjawisk [15].

Edwards i wsp. wiążą obecne w aplikacjach mZdrowia elementy gamifikacji z technikami wykorzystywanymi w psychologii, służącymi do skutecznej zmiany zachowania [16]. W ich przeglądzie aplikacji najczęstszymi elementami gamifikacji, które zarazem można uznać za techniki zmiany zachowania, były m.in. możliwość porównywania swoich wyników z wynikami innych osób i nagrody. Z kolei Johnson i wsp. umieszczają gamifikację w kontekście teorii autodeterminacji, w której rozróżnia się motywację wewnętrzną i zewnętrzną [17]. Z perspektywy zachowań prozdrowotnych kluczowa jest motywacja wewnętrzna, sprawia ona bowiem, że podejmuje się działania ze względu na nie same i z własnej inicjatywy, a nie pod wpływem czynników zewnętrznych. Jak twierdzą badacze, gamifikacja może oddziaływać na pogłębianie motywacji wewnętrznej, a tym samym zwiększać szansę na podtrzymanie pożądanego zachowania. Istnieją badania pokazujące nie tylko potencjał gamifikacji, lecz także jej realny, pozytywny wpływ na czynności związane ze zdrowiem. W studium Cafazzo i wsp. [18] wprowadzenie elementu gamifikacji (zdobywanie punktów i nagród) sprawiło, że cierpiący na cukrzycę pacjenci lepiej kontrolowali stężenie glukozy. Z kolei w badaniach Dennis i O’Toole [19] trening tendencyjności uwagi (CBM) z elementami gry redukował objawy lękowe wśród badanych bardziej skutecznie niż w grupie kontrolnej, w której zastosowano CBM bez gamifikacji. Potencjał gamifikacji był również badany w kontekście problemu nadmiernego picia alkoholu. Boyle i wsp. [20] za pomocą wprowadzenia elementów gamifikacji (punkty, awatary, losowość) zwiększyli skuteczność oddziaływania jednego z narzędzi używanych do korygowania percepcji spożywania alkoholu. Z kolei Cook i wsp. [21] przedstawili wyniki badań nad skutecznością kampanii społecznej skierowanej do marynarzy amerykańskich, która miała na celu ograniczenie incydentów związanych z nadmiernym piciem. Jednym z elementów była gra mobilna mająca uświadomić konsekwencje nierozważnego picia. Oprócz elementów typowych dla klasycznych gier (narracja, wcielanie się w rolę), w aplikacji wprowadzono możliwość gromadzenia punktów i dzielenia się wynikami z innymi użytkownikami.

Wnioski

Duża popularność aplikacji proalkoholowych rodzi pytania o ich rolę w upowszechnianiu szkodliwych nawyków. Aplikacje tego typu mogą bowiem nie tyle być nieznaczącym dodatkiem do i tak podejmowanych czynności spożywania alkoholu, ale z uwagi na łatwość obsługi czy wspomniany wcześniej ludyczny charakter zachęcać do konsumpcji. Picie jest tutaj rozumiane jako niewinna praktyka zabawowa pozbawiona negatywnych konsekwencji.

Pomimo że aplikacje proalkoholowe cieszą się większą popularnością niż prozdrowotne, to analiza tych ostatnich, uwzględniająca ich charakter, cel, funkcjonalności, popularność i zakres oddziaływania, pokazała ich potencjał jako narzędzia zmiany zachowań ryzykownych. Ważnym narzędziem na drodze do ograniczenia konsumpcji alkoholu mogą okazać się zarówno indywidualizujące, jak i prospołeczne elementy aplikacji prozdrowotnych. Aplikacje prozdrowotne zachęcają do refleksyjnego zarządzania własnymi nawykami, pozwalają na wzięcie odpowiedzialności za swoje zachowanie i skłaniają do samokontroli. Jednocześnie wchodzenie w społeczność składającą się z innych użytkowników może zwiększyć świadomość własnego problemu i zachęcić do poszukiwania profesjonalnej pomocy.

Warto również podkreślić ograniczenia tego typu aplikacji. Sukces ich stosowania zależy bowiem w dużej mierze od determinacji użytkownika. Aplikacjami można szybko się znudzić, a w związku z tym przestać je używać. Wydaje się zatem, że nie mogą one w pełni zastąpić procesu terapeutycznego. Sama aplikacja, nawet najlepiej skonstruowana, nie jest w stanie być jedynym rozwiązaniem problemów związanych z alkoholem.

Konflikt interesów

Nie występuje.

Finansowanie

Projekt „Wykorzystanie nowych technologii w procesie zdrowienia z uzależnienia (mWSPARCIE 2018–2020)” finansowany przez Państwową Agencję Rozwiązywania Problemów Alkoholowych w ramach realizacji zadań Narodowego Programu Zdrowia 2016–2020 (umowa 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Etyka

Treści przedstawione w pracy są zgodne z zasadami Deklaracji Helsińskiej odnoszącymi się do badań z udziałem ludzi, ujednoliconymi wymaganiami dla czasopism biomedycznych oraz z zasadami etycznymi określonymi w Porozumieniu z Farmington w 1997 roku.

Piśmiennictwo

1. Catford J. The new social learning: connect better for better health. Health Promotion International 2011; 26(2): 133-5.
2. Laakso EL, Armstrong K, Usher W. Cyber-management of people with chronic disease: a potential solution to eHealth challenges. Health Education Journal 2011; 5(3): 1-8.
3. Piette JD, Lun KC, Moura LA Jr, Fraser SFH, Mecheal PN, Powell J, et al. Impacts of e-health on the outcomes of care in low-and middle-income countries: where do we go from here? Bull World Health Organ 2012; 90: 365-72.
4. Ganasegeran K, Renganathan P, Rashid A, Al-Dubai SAR. The m-Health revolution: exploring perceived benefits of WhatsApp use in clinical practice. Int J Med Inform 2017; 97: 145-51.
5. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
6. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an evidence-based, theoretically informed, mobile technology-based system to improve outcomes for people in recovery for alcohol dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111.
7. Hoeppner BB, Schick MR, Kelly LM, Hoeppner SS, Bergman B, Kelly JF. There is an app for that – or is there? A content analysis of publicly available smartphone apps for managing alcohol use. J Subst Abuse Treat 2017; 82: 67-73.
8. Ramsey AT. Integration of technology-based behavioral health interventions in substance abuse and addiction services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80.
9. Cohn AM, Hunter-Reel D, Hagman BT, Mitchell J. Promoting behavior change from alcohol use through mobile technology: the future of ecological momentary assessment. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2011; 35(12): 2209-15.
10. Choe EK, Lee NB, Lee B, Pratt W, Kientz JA. Understanding quantified-selfers’ practices in collecting and exploring personal data. In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Toronto: ACM; 2014; p. 1143-52.
11. Lupton D. The Quantified Self. Cambridge: Polity; 2016.
12. Wróblewski M. Nowe szaty healthismu. Self-tracking, neoliberalizm i kapitalizm kognitywny. Folia Sociologica 2016; 58: 7-25.
13. Lister C, West JH, Cannon B, Sax T, Brodegard D. Just a fad? Gamification in health and fitness apps. JMIR Serious Games 2014; 2: e9. DOI: 10.2196/games.3413.
14. Maturo A. Doing Things with Numbers. The quantified self and the gamification of health. Eä Journal 2015; 7(1): 87-105.
15. Pereira P, Duarte E, Rebero F, Noriega P. A Review of gamification for health-related contexts. In: Marcus A (ed.). Design, User Experience and Usability, Part II. Springer; 2014, p. 742-53.
16. Edwards EA, Lumsden J, Rivas C, Steed L, Edwards LA, Thiyagarajan A, et al. Gamification for health promotion: systematic review of behaviour change techniques in smartphone app. BMJ Open 2016; 6: e012447. DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012447.
17. Johnson D, Deterding S, Kuhn KA, Staneva A, Stoyanov S, Hides L. Gamification for health and wellbeing: a systematic review of the literature. Internet Interv 2016; 6: 89-106.
18. Caffazo JA, Casselman M, Hamming N, Katzman DK, Palmert MR. Design of an mHealth app for the self-management of adolescent type 1 diabetes: a pilot study. J Med Internet Res 2012; 14(3): e70. DOI: 0.2196/jmir.2058.
19. Dennis TA, O’Toole L. Mental health on the go: effects of a gamified attention bias modification mobile application in trait anxious adults. Clin Psychol Sci 2014; 2(5): 576-90.
20. Boyle SC, Earle AM, LaBrie JW, Smith DJ. PNF 2.0? Initial evidence that gamification can increase the efficacy of brief, web-based personalized normative feedback alcohol interventions. Addict Behav 2017; 67: 8-17.
21. Cook K, Brennan E, Colleen G, Kennard T. „Keep what you’ve earned”: encouraging sailors to drink responsibly. In: Marcus A (ed.). Design, User Experience and Usability, Part II. Springer; 2014, p. 575-86.
This is an Open Access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), allowing third parties to download and share its works but not commercially purposes or to create derivative works.
Quick links
© 2020 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe