eISSN: 2449-8238
ISSN: 2392-1099
Clinical and Experimental Hepatology
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
2/2019
vol. 5
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Risk factors predicting nosocomial, healthcare-associated and community-acquired infection in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and survival outcome

Mayank Jain
,
Uday Sanglodkar
,
Jayanthi Venkataraman

Clin Exp HEPATOL 2019; 5, 2: 133–139
Online publish date: 2019/05/14
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Aim of the study
To determine risk factors predicting nosocomial, healthcare-associated and community-acquired infection in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and survival outcome.

Material and methods
This prospective observational study included confirmed cases of cirrhosis with ascites requiring paracentesis, age > 18 years, either gender, any aetiology and Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) stage, with or without cirrhosis-related complications. Patient data included age, gender, co-morbidity, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, CTP score, cirrhosis-related complications, details of previous hospitalization, ascitic tapping and antibiotics instituted. SBP was diagnosed as ascitic fluid polymorphonuclear leucocyte count greater than 250/mm3 (0.25 × 109/l) and/or culture positivity for a single organism. Statistics – chi square test, Mann-Whitney U test, ANOVA, survival plot. A p value < 0.05 was statistically significant.

Results
610 cases fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. 122 (20%) patients had SBP: community-acquired SBP 37 (30.3%), nosocomial SBP 19 (16.5%) and healthcare-associated SBP 66 (54.5%). The majority were men (106; 86%) with median age of 51.5 (27-78) years. A significantly higher percentage of community-acquired SBP belonged to CTP class B. Thirtytwo and 7 patients respectively were blood and ascitic fluid culture positive. Significant nosocomial SBP were blood culture positive (p < 0.02). The most common isolates were E. coli followed by Klebsiella. Survival plot analysis at 3 months showed the worst survival for nosocomial SBP (p = 0.0009).

Conclusions
Prevalence of SBP in our study was 20%, the majority with healthcare-associated SBP belonging to CTP C. Patients with nosocomial SBP had significant bacteremia with high mortality.

keywords:

infection, ascites, cirrhosis

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