eISSN: 1897-4309
ISSN: 1428-2526
Contemporary Oncology/Współczesna Onkologia
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Supplements Addendum Special Issues Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
4/2012
vol. 16
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Review paper

Surveillance programs for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

Krzysztof Simon
,
Sylwia Serafińska
,
Monika Pazgan-Simon

Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (4): 295–299
[Polish version: Wspolczesna Onkol 2012; 16 (4): 300–305]
Online publish date: 2012/09/29
Article files
- Badania przesiewowe.pdf  [0.08 MB]
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma

Growing morbidity and mortality due to primary liver cancer in many regions of the world are mostly attributable to the ageing of populations, increasing prevalence of infections with hepatotropic viruses (HBV and HCV in particular), growing exposure to potentially carcinogenic factors in the environment as well as carcinogenesis-promoting behaviours. Increases in the number of detected and diagnosed cases of HCC are also, paradoxically, a consequence of the progress that has been made in medical diagnostics, with a special emphasis on imaging diagnostics [1–3].

HCC represents 5% of all malignancies worldwide. It is the most common primary malignancy of the liver (~80% in adults, ~35% in children), the third most frequent cause of cancer mortality and the leading cause of death among cirrhosis patients. HCC occurs more frequently in men, nearly always developing in cirrhosis-affected or chronically damaged liver. In children the disease may develop even in pathologically unaffected liver. The incidence of HCC increases with age. In countries with high incidence rates of HCC the disease is diagnosed in younger population groups, even under 20 years of age. In highly industrialized countries, on the other hand, HCC rarely occurs under 50 years of age. The discrepancy may stem from differences in the epidemiological status in terms of occurrence and dissemination of HBV infections (e.g. dominant pattern of perinatal transmission of HBV from carrier mothers to newborns in Asian countries) and HCV infection, as well as local nutritional habits (e.g. exposure to alpha-toxins).

The highest incidence of primary cancer is observed in regions with high rates of infection with hepatotropic viruses. Over 80% of all HCC cases occur in developing countries including China, South-eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. In Eastern Asia and Central Africa, where 10–20% of the population are infected with HBV, the incidence of HCC is 30–120 per 100 000 inhabitants (over 70% of all cases of HCC worldwide). In North and South America, and in Europe, where HBV infections are less common than HCV, the incidence of HCC is 5–10 per 100 000 inhabitants. The incidence of HCC is much lower in highly developed countries (USA, Canada, North-eastern Europe < 5 / 100 000 inhabitants), however in the UK or the USA the incidence rates have doubled over the past 20–30 years, probably due to environmental or metabolic factors. According to IACR data for 2010, the incidence of HCC in Poland is 3.1 per 100 000 men and 1.5 per 100 000 women, respectively, however our own experience shows the values to be substantially underestimated. In recent years, the number of deaths due to HCC in Poland has been higher than the number of diagnosed cases, which points to the inadequacy of Poland’s existing system of cancer registration. At the same time, there are countries (in which routine HBV immunization schemes were introduced) where a slight reduction in HCC incidence has been noted recently [1, 2].

Although cirrhosis alone underlies over 90% of all cases of primary liver cancer, the number of known or potential factors associated with HCC development is constantly on the increase. The most important include: chronic HBV infection regardless of the stage of liver disease (the problem affects as much as one third of the population), chronic HCV infection (in practice the problem only affects patients suffering from cirrhosis), HBV/HCV or HBV/HCV/HIV co-infection, as well as a range of non-infectious causes such as alcoholic liver disease, fatty liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis (where an increase in incidence has been recorded in recent years), hemochromatosis, α1-antitrypsin deficiency, congenital tyrosinemia, aflatoxins, nicotine dependence, anabolic hormones and estrogens. The overlapping of factors, which is typically observed, markedly elevates the risk of cancerogenesis in the liver. Patients who are at a risk of HCC development require constant and comprehensive hepatology monitoring. Early diagnosis increases the chances of successful treatment, especially considering the fact that the expected average doubling time of primary liver cancer is 4 to 5 months [1–4].

HCC formation is a complex and multi-stage process. Hepatocytes in healthy liver, which are considered long-living cells, undergo cell divisions relatively rarely. The situation, however, is markedly different in pathologically changed liver. Recurrent damage to hepatocytes, other cells present in the hepatic parenchyma and extracellular matrix (ECM), which are associated with the chronic necroinflammatory process, lead both to parenchymal regeneration and progressive fibrosis and/or reorganization of the cytoangioarchitectonics of the liver accompanied by the formation of pseudotumours, i.e. liver cirrhosis. Chronic damage can also result in the deactivation of apoptosis and cell death mechanisms, disturbed interactions between individual cells and increased cell divisions in the liver, i.e. induction of one or more proto-oncogenic transformations.

Between 50 and 100 pro-oncogenic mutations have been identified in highly malignant HCC cells, together with alterations and disturbances of multiple signalling pathways within the cells (which, incidentally, was the rationale behind introducing into clinical practice drugs that block specific proteins linked to signal transmission in hepatocytes). Similarly to other malignancies, HCC involves loss of differentiation capacity as well as ability to induce angiogenesis and infiltrate (invade) and metastasize into locations which, under normal conditions, are populated by other cells.

The shared trait of all primary liver malignancies is their increased angiogenesis which provides fast-growing tumour tissues with necessary nutrients, growth factors and oxygen. It is believed that tumour growth beyond 2–3 mm3 (the limit at which cells can be nourished solely by simple diffusion mechanism using the body’s existing network of blood vessels) depends on the tumour’s ability to form new blood vessels. The process of pathological angiogenesis involves a range of factors including hypoxia of tumour cells followed by inactivation of suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes, ultimately resulting in the tumour cells starting to secrete angiogenesis-inducing factors on a permanent basis [1, 4, 5].

Diagnostics – current diagnostic standard (revised in 2011)

Clinical signs



The majority of patients, especially if underlying cirrhosis is present, fail to exhibit any clinical signs of liver cancer. HCC is typically detected accidentally during periodic medical check-ups or during increasingly common screening tests (addressed in the present article). Other HCC patients may develop a sudden instability of liver function, hypoglycaemia, polycythemia, hypercholesterolaemia and feminization (in men).

Advanced stages of HCC, frequently involving multiple foci, are dominated by progressive cachexia, painful sensation in the epigastric region, abdominal discomfort, rarely acute abdomen or haemorrhagic shock (following tumour rupture). Naturally, clinical signs do not always determine the nature of liver disease, or the size or type of cancer, hence the usefulness of clinical signs in HCC diagnostics is doubtful.



Diagnostic standard



The diagnostic standard for HCC has been constantly evolving in recent years [2, 6–13], partly due to improvements in imaging techniques. According to the current criteria, a reliable diagnosis of HCC can be made if one imaging modality (CT/MRI) reveals a mass in the liver, > 2 cm in diameter, accompanied by hypervascularity in the arterial phase and contrast agent washout in the venous phase or equilibrium phase. The current diagnostic standard thus disregards determination of α-fetoprotein (AFP) regardless of the concentration level, which understandably gives rise to concern among many medical practitioners, and contradicts results obtained in an array of clinical trials.

The diagnosis thus made does not require histopathological verification, unless imaging results are inconclusive, in which case tumour biopsy should be performed. Regardless of the above, in a considerable proportion of patients the location of tumour(s), coexisting coagulation disorders or unstable liver function typically accompanying advanced liver cirrhosis make invasive diagnostic procedures not only unnecessary (in the opinion of most practising clinicians) but also technically unfeasible or excessively risky (risk of bleeding, especially with larger tumours, and risk of disseminating tumour cells along the needle insertion channel, estimated at ca. 3%) – and associated with a considerable (40%) risk of falsely negative results (for small tumours). Furthermore, the diagnostic standard outlined above excludes a rare histological variant of hepatocellular carcinoma, i.e. fibromellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FHCC). FHCC occurs typically among young adults without cirrhosis and demonstrates an expansive growth pattern. Also, it is not accompanied by an increase in AFP concentration [7, 9, 11].

The diagnosis of advanced-stage HCC is not usually problematic, however individual small nodules (1–2 cm) detected in cirrhosis patients are not sufficient for a straightforward diagnosis. This has an adverse impact on the status of patients, as only early diagnosis (with an emphasis on patient screening) allows radical treatment, unfortunately only in a proportion of cases. In uncertain cases diagnosis can be facilitated by:

• CT (multi-phase spiral CT scanning) or MRI revealing contrast agent washout in the venous phase or equilibrium phase (differential diagnosis with dysplastic nodule, regenerative nodule or arteriovenous fistula),

• implementing another imaging modality to verify the initial findings (uncertain CT results require MRI and vice versa),

• performing a histopathological assessment of bioptate obtained from the lesion (taking into account the reservations listed above), particularly if imaging results are ambiguous or atypical [11].

If doubts still remain as to the interpretation of imaging test results, especially if tumour growth is observed, biopsy should be repeated and biopsied material should be assessed by a histopathologist experienced in liver pathology.

In patients suffering from cirrhosis, in whom small focal lesions with a diameter of less than 1 cm are detected by ultrasonography, the tests need to be repeated every 4 months in the first year of follow-up, and then twice annually.

Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging

The vital importance of early diagnosis for HCC patients is clearly evident in clinical data forming the basis for BCLC (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer), i.e. the most practical and up-to-date classification of HCC stages, assessment of patient outcomes and therapeutic options, which has been revised several times since 1999 (though several other staging systems are also in use) [2, 11, 13].

The only therapy that provides a chance for patient treatment is early tumour detection and surgical resection of liver tissues together with the tumour (partial hepatectomy, hepatic lobectomy) or liver transplant. Cancer advancement makes surgical intervention possible only in < 20–30% patients (in Poland the figure is ca. 10%), i.e. patients at a very early (< 2 cm) or early stage of cancer, according to the BCLC criteria. For lesions that are limited to only one liver lobe (with normal hepatic function, no portal hypertension) surgical resection (with a 1 cm margin) is an option. Patients with more advanced HCC are eligible for liver transplant as long as no large blood vessels are invaded. Patients with medium and advanced HCC are not eligible for radical surgery, while mean overall survival without treatment is dramatically short, between 3 and 6 months from diagnosis.

Moreover, according to the Milan criteria, identification of a single HCC focus with a diameter > 5 cm, or more than three lesions less than 3 cm in diameter, without underlying cirrhosis, excludes radical surgery in the majority of patients. Smaller tumours, if unfavourably located (e.g. in the perihilar region), also make patients ineligible for surgical treatment. It was not until recently that broader possibilities emerged for palliative procedures and/or therapy with drugs blocking the signalling pathways within the tumour tissues and angiogenesis (sorafenib being the only registered drug in this indication to date) in individuals who are not eligible for radical treatment [7–13].

Possibilities of early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

Guidelines regarding HCC screening specified in standards adopted by major scientific societies: European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG), Japanese Society of Hepatology (JSG), American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD) are quite similar [2, 7–13], though they are systematically revised.

In order to facilitate early diagnosis of HCC, and thus enable radical surgical treatment, abdominal ultrasonography should be performed every six months (AASLD and EASL standards) [10, 11] in adult patients who are at a high risk of HCC development [11] (i.e. individuals suffering from liver cirrhosis regardless of aetiology (Child-Pugh scores A and B); patients with liver cirrhosis regardless of aetiology (Child-Pugh score C, awaiting liver transplant); patients with chronic liver disease and a positive family history of HCC; patients with chronic liver disease infected with HCV and liver fibrosis (minimum grade F3) and, in some reports, infected with HBV in early childhood or many years ago). AFP assay, which used to be performed every 6 months in the diagnostic screening for HCC, has now been excluded from diagnostic standards because of ultimately high costs involved in this screening method and only a small (6–8%) increase in the number of new diagnosed cases of early HCC and a considerable proportion of falsely positive results, when AFP tests were conducted in combination with ultrasonography. AFP in HCC diagnostics has been found to have the cut-off value of 20 ng/ml, sensitivity of 39–64%, specificity of 76–91% and predictive value of 9–42%.

Routine ultrasonography, on the other hand, has a sensitivity in the range of 65–80% and specificity of 90%, though for early lesions the specificity level is only 30%. Furthermore, the final result depends on the experience and skills of the person performing the test, and on the quality of equipment used. The error margin thus continues to be quite significant, hence studies are under way to develop new non-invasive tests and methods of early HCC surveillance.

Patients with a focal lesion detected by ultrasonography and/or with elevated AFP concentrations (as in the previous diagnostics standards) should definitely undergo contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scanning and/or MRI scanning to verify HCC diagnosis. Also, whenever possible, liver biopsy should be performed to confirm the cancer diagnosis. The diagnosis and differentiation of early forms of HCC is facilitated by histochemical assessment of the bioptate (Survivin, LYVE-1) [14–18].

Serological markers useful in the diagnostics

of hepatocellular carcinoma: critical evaluation

-fetoprotein is a major glycoprotein which, in normal physiological conditions, is produced by the yolk sac and the liver during foetal development. Despite being the most common HCC marker, AFP is not specific for HCC. Elevated serum concentrations of AFP are also detected in:

• healthy pregnant women,

• patients with testicular tumours (seminoma, teratoma), embryonal carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal or ovarian cancer (hepatoid cancers), in CCC (cholangiocellular carcinoma, cancer composed of epithelial cells that originate in the bile ducts),

• acute or chronic liver disease (e.g. secondary to HBV or HCV) accompanied by intensive regenerative processes,

• patients with adenocarcinoma metastases into the liver,

• liver cirrhosis complicated by hepatorenal syndrome,

• non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,

• renal failure.

There are also reports on reduced AFP concentrations in HCV-infected patients following effective antiviral therapy [2, 9, 13–15, 17–19].

It has nevertheless been proven that:

• confirmed AFP concentration > 400 ng/ml allows unambiguous diagnosis of HCC if characteristic features are identified in imaging tests,

• confirmed AFP concentration > 500 ng/ml in a patient with liver cirrhosis, regardless of aetiology, is equivalent to HCC diagnosis – 100% test specificity (nevertheless excluded from currently used diagnostic standards),

• steady increase in AFP concentration (> 20 ng/ml) in cirrhosis patients in 2-3 consecutive AFP tests is suggestive of HCC (even if no tumour is evidenced in imaging tests),

• renewed increase in AFP concentration after surgical treatment should be linked to cancer recurrence or formation of a new focus (following tumour removal AFP levels rapidly fall; the half-life is 3,4-5 days),

• there is a correlation between AFP concentration and tumour size; AFP > 400 ng/ml – large tumours located in both liver lobes, infiltrating the portal vein,

• high AFP concentrations are linked to worse prognosis,

• AFP > 1000 ng/ml – an indicator of poor prognosis.

AFP testing in the screening diagnostics of this cancer type, however, is a problematic issue since not all hepatocellular carcinomas produce AFP [up to 40% of patients, particularly with underlying alcoholic cirrhosis and, naturally, with fibromellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FHCC)]. Also, there is no strict correlation between AFP levels and histopathological stage and differentiation of HCC; elevated AFP concentrations are more commonly observed in those patients in whom HCC is preceded by post-inflammatory cirrhosis secondary to HCV than alcoholic cirrhosis.

Summing up, normal AFP concentrations do not rule out HCC, whereas AFP assays fail to fulfil the criteria of a sensitive diagnostic test in HCC detection. In addition, AFP assays have a limited diagnostic specificity. It has been demonstrated that sensitivity decreases and diagnostic specificity increases along with increasing threshold AFP concentrations. At concentration levels  200 ng/ml sensitivity is 22%, with high specificity [7, 15, 18, 19].

Since AFP tests are an imperfect diagnostic method in the detection of early forms of hepatocellular cancer, efforts are under way to identify superior diagnostic and prognostic serological markers of HCC, as discussed below.

AFP-L3 is a fraction of AFP reactive with Lens culinaris agglutinin; it is detected in HCC even if traditional AFP concentrations are within the normal range. The diagnostic technique, however, is still time-consuming and has not found a broader application in clinical practice. The AFP-L3/total AFP indicator has been found particularly useful in clinical applications, as it correlates with HCC stage [15].

Des--carboxy prothrombin (DCP, PIVKA II) – a form of prothrombin induced by the absence of vitamin K in malignant hepatocytes regardless of vitamin K supplementation. Liebman et al. [20] were the first to demonstrate that the serum concentration of DCP was elevated in 69 out of 76 HCC patients, with 53–89% sensitivity and 59–84% specificity.

Mean DCP concentration detected in HCC patients is 900 ng/ml and is thus markedly higher than the 10–42 ng/ml range identified in patients suffering from chronic viral hepatitis and adenocarcinoma metastases to the liver. The observation has led to the suggestion, which has not been implemented in the majority of countries yet, that DCP and AFP levels should be assayed simultaneously as part of HCC screening [15, 16, 18, 20].

Other proteins (e.g. PIVKA VII, IX, X, proteins C and S, osteocalcin) – there have been isolated reports evaluating the usefulness of other proteins induced by the deficiency of vitamin K for early HCC diagnosis. The findings of these studies have not, as yet, been translated into clinical practice to any major extent [15].

-L-fucosidase (AFU) – is synthesized by different cells than AFP and could, in the future, be a useful supplementary test in patients with suspicious focal lesions in the liver (research is in progress) [21].

Soluble glypican 3 (sGPC-3) – concentrations > 2 ng/ml indicate 51% sensitivity and 90% specificity in HCC diagnostics. The sensitivity level has been shown to rise to 72% when sGPC-3 is assayed in combination with AFP. Consequently, SGPC-3 seems to be a promising biomarker for the differential diagnosis between dysplastic tumours and early forms of HCC < 3 cm! [15].

Other potential markers which are currently under study (of undetermined usefulness, with only isolated reports available) include -glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP) isoenzymes, transforming growth factor 1 (TGF-1), antibodies anti-p53, Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GOLPH2/GP73), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-2, human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), chitotriosidase, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (VEGF > 240 pg/ml – independent factor of poor prognosis in HCC) [18, 22–24].

Circulating microRNA-21 – there is evidence to suggest that microRNA-21 concentration is significantly higher in patients with HCC compared with patients suffering from chronic viral hepatitis (61.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity) and with healthy subjects (87.3% sensitivity and 92.0% specificity). Furthermore, it has been shown that the serum concentration of this marker is significantly reduced after successful HCC resection. The findings are novel and interesting, though any practical clinical application of microRNA21 assays in HCC screening is probably still a couple of years away [25].

Tissue markers useful in the diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma

Despite not being useful for the screening diagnosis of HCC, tissue markers are extremely valuable in differential diagnosis. Detection of selected mRNA in the liver tissue allows a precise assessment of the risk of primary liver cancer and, theoretically (sic!), makes it possible to detect individual micrometastases and secondary tumours. For example, analysis of AFP expression is recognized as a gold standard in HCC diagnostics, both at the level of protein expression and mRNA; AFP mRNA status correlates with tumour size and serum AFP concentration, and with the presence of extrahepatic metastases.

GPC-3 mRNA performs a similar function. The expression of glypican-3 in hepatocytes is very limited (even absent

in hyperplasia or cirrhosis), however it rises 5–10-fold in 75–80% of HCC cases compared to healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. Consequently, this tumour marker allows early HCC diagnosis! Intensive studies are also under way to develop new specific markers that would be typical for various cancer types that can develop in the hepatic parenchyma, and would be vital in early and differential diagnostics [15, 26].

Imaging tests

Recent years have seen an enormous progress in the development of advanced imaging modalities. Different imaging techniques are widely discussed in a number of excellent publications, also in Polish, and are thus excluded from the scope of the present study [6–13].

Summary

1. Studies conducted to date have failed to show any of the markers discussed above to be superior to AFP in terms of diagnostic specificity.

2. The majority of suggested serological markers are more

specific in advanced-stage HCC, with large focal lesions, i.e. forms that make patients ineligible for radical therapy.

3. None of the markers discussed above fulfil the criteria of a screening test, which make them unsuitable for early HCC surveillance.

4. Markers which are currently used for early HCC diagnosis (AFP, AFP-L3, DCP) are suboptimal for routine clinical practice.

5. The future of screening diagnosis of HCC probably lies in a combination of markers (diagnostic panels) used together with advanced, though cost-effective, imaging tests. Diagnostic kits should comprise compounds which are involved in different independent pathophysiological pathways of neoplastic transformation, which ensures higher diagnostic accuracy.

References

 1. Gomaa AI, Khan SA, Toledano MB, Waked I, Taylor-Robinson SD. Hepatocellular carcinoma: epidemiology, risk factors and pathogenesis. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14: 4300-8.

 2. Kompendium postępowania w nowotworach wątroby. Simon K, Krzemieniecki K (red.). Termedia, Poznań 2012.

 3. But DY, Lai CL, Yuen MF. Natural history of hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14: 1652-1656.

 4. Schirmacher P. Molecular mechanism of human hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatol Intl 2010; 4 1 suppl: S45-7.

 5. Dragani T. Risk of HCC: genetic heterogeneity and complex genetics. J Hepatol 2010; 52: 252-7.

 6. European Association For The Study Of The Liver. EASL Clinical practice guidelines: management of chronic hepatitis B virus infection. J Hepatol 2012; 57: 167-85.

 7. De Lope RC, Tremosini S, Forner A, Reig M, Briux J. Management of HCC. J Hepatol 2012; 56 (1 suppl): S75-87.

 8. Ryder SD; British Society of Gastroenterology. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in adults. Gut 2003; 52 Suppl 3:iii1-8.

 9. Bialecki E, Di Bisceglie AM. Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. HPB (Oxford) 2005; 7: 26-34.

10. Bruix J, Sherman M; American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: an update. Hepatology 2011; 53: 1020-22.

11. European Association For The Study Of The Liver; European Organisation For Research And Treatment Of Cancer. EASL-EORTC clinical practice guidelines: management of hepatocellular carcinoma. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 908-43.

12. Szurowska E, Nowicki T, Studniarek M. Diagnostyka obrazowa raka pierwotnego wątroby. Onkol Prakt Klin 2011; 7: 73-83.

13. Małkowski P, Wasiak D, Czerwiński J. Rekomendacje dotyczące rozpoznania i leczenia raka wątrobowokomórkowego. Medical Science Review Hepatologia 2009; 4: 27-33.

14. Zhang BH, Yang BH, Tang ZY. Randomized controlled trial of screening for hepatocellular carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 2004; 130: 417-22

15. Wang H. Biomarkers for the diagnosis of HCC. Hepatol Int 2010; 4 (Suppl 1): S77-80.

16. Madaliński K, Jończyk M, Rybczyńska J, Wawrzynowicz-Syczewska M, Boroń-Kaczmarska A. Serological markers for hepatocellular carcinoma – modern trends. Cent Eur J Immunol 2005; 30: 32-35.

17. Marrero JA. Screening tests for hepatocellular carcinoma. Clin Liver Dis 2005; 9: 235-51.

18. International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular NeoplasiaThe International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular Neoplasia. Pathologic diagnosis of early hepatocellular carcinoma: a report of the international consensus group for hepa¬tocellular neoplasia. Hepatology 2009; 49: 658-64.

19. Di Bisceglie AM, Sterling RK, Chung RT, et al. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels in patients with advanced hepatitis C: results from the HALT-C Trial. J Hepatol 2005; 43: 434-41.

20. Liebman HA, Furie BC, Tong MJ, Blanchard RA, Lo KJ, Lee SD, Coleman MS, Furie B. Des-gamma-carboxy (abnormal) prothrombin as a serum marker of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. N Engl J Med 1984; 310: 1427-31.

21. Takahashi H, Saibara T, Iwamura S, Tomita A, Maeda T, Onishi S, Yamamoto Y, Enzan H. Serum alpha-L-fucosidase activity and tumor size in hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatology 1994; 19: 1414-7.

22. Kew MC, Wolf P, Whittaker D, Rowe P. Tumour-associated isoenzymes of gamma-glutamyl transferase in the serum of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Br J Cancer 1984; 50: 451-5.

23. Tsai JF, Jeng JE, Chuang LY, et al. Clinical evaluation of urinary transforming growth factor-beta1 and serum alpha-fetoprotein as tumour markers of hepatocellular carcinoma. Br J Cancer 1997; 75: 1460-6.

24. Villa E, Colantoni A, Cammà C, Grottola A, Buttafoco P, Gelmini R, Ferretti I, Manenti F. Estrogen receptor classification for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with clinical staging systems. J Clin Oncol 2003; 21: 441-6.

25. Tomimaru Y, Eguchi H, Nagano H, et al. Circulating microRNA-21 as a novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 167-75.

26. Stokowska A, Stalke P, Bielawski KP. Molecular markers of micrometastasis in the blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Postępy Hig Med Dośw 2007; 61: 310-9.



Address for correspondence



Krzysztof Simon



Department of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology

Wrocław Medical University

ul. Koszarowa 5

51-149 Wrocław

tel. +48 71 326 13 25

fax +48 71 325 52 42



Submitted: 15.08.2012

Accepted: 10.09.2012

Epidemiologia i etiopatogeneza raka wątrobowokomórkowego

Rejestrowane w wielu regionach świata zwiększenie liczby zachorowań i zgonów z powodu pierwotnych nowotworów wątroby jest niewątpliwie wynikiem starzenia się populacji, rozprzestrzenienia się zakażeń wirusami hepatotropowymi – szczególnie wirusem zapalenia wątroby typu B (hepatitis B virus – HBV) i typu C (hepatitis C virus – HCV), narastania liczby czynników potencjalnie rakotwórczych w środowisku oraz zachowań sprzyjających kancerogenezie. Zwiększona liczba wykrytych i potwierdzonych przypadków raka wątrobowokomórkowego to paradoksalnie także wynik postępu, jaki dokonał się w diagnostyce medycznej, szczególnie diagnostyce obrazującej [1–3].

Rak wątrobowokomórkowy (hepatocellular carcinoma – HCC) stanowi 5% wszystkich nowotworów złośliwych na świecie, jest najczęstszym pierwotnym nowotworem złośliwym wątroby (~80% u dorosłych, ~35% u dzieci). Zajmuje trzecie miejsce, jeśli chodzi o przyczyny zgonów z powodu choroby nowotworowej, i stanowi wiodącą przyczynę zgonów u pacjentów z marskością wątroby, częściej rozwija się u mężczyzn i prawie zawsze w wątrobie marskiej lub przewlekle uszkodzonej. Niestety, u dzieci może się rozwinąć w wątrobie niezmienionej chorobowo. Zapadalność na HCC wzrasta z wiekiem. W krajach o wysokim wskaźniku zapadalności HCC występuje w młodszych wiekowo grupach populacyjnych, nawet przed 20. rokiem życia. W krajach wysoce uprzemysłowionych rzadko pojawia się przed 50. rokiem życia. Różnice te mogą wynikać z odmiennej sytuacji epidemiologicznej, jeśli chodzi o występowanie i sposób szerzenia się zakażeń HBV (np. dominująca droga okołoporodowa w krajach azjatyckich) i HCV, oraz lokalnych zwyczajów żywieniowych (np. narażenie na -toksyny).

Największą zapadalność na raka pierwotnego obserwuje się w rejonach wysokiej zapadalności na zakażenia wirusami hepatotropowymi. Ponad 80% wszystkich przypadków HCC występuje w krajach rozwijających się, takich jak Chiny, Azja Południowo-Wschodnia, Afryka Subsaharyjska. W Azji Wschodniej oraz Afryce Środkowej, gdzie wirusem HBV zakażone jest 10–20% populacji, zapadalność na HCC wynosi 30–120/100 tys. mieszkańców (ponad 70% wszystkich przypadków HCC na świecie); w Ameryce Północnej, Ameryce Południowej oraz Europie, gdzie rzadziej występuje HBV, ale częściej HCV, zapadalność na HCC wynosi 5–10/100 tys. mieszkańców. Zapadalność na HCC jest znacznie mniejsza w krajach wysokorozwiniętych (Stany Zjednoczone, Kanada, Europa Północno-Zachodnia < 5/100 tys. mieszkańców), jednakże w Wielkiej Brytanii czy Stanach Zjednoczonych uległa podwojeniu w ciągu ostatnich 20–30 lat (czynniki środowiskowe? metaboliczne?). Zapadalność na HCC w Polsce wynosi wg danych IACR z 2010 r. odpowiednio: 3,1/100 tys. mężczyzn i 1,5/100 tys. kobiet, jednak z obserwacji własnych wynika, że są to wartości znacznie niedoszacowane. Liczba zgonów z powodu HCC w ostatnich latach w Polsce przewyższa liczbę ustalonych rozpoznań – dowodzi to jedynie niedoskonałości systemu zgłoszeń choroby nowotworowej w naszym kraju. Jednocześnie w wielu krajach (są to państwa, które wdrożyły program szczepień przeciw HBV) w ostatnim czasie odnotowano niewielki spadek zapadalności na HCC [1, 2].

Choć sama marskość wątroby leży u podłoża ponad 90% pierwotnych raków wątroby, to liczba znanych lub potencjalnych czynników związanych z rozwojem HCC stale się zwiększa. Do najważniejszych zalicza się przewlekłe zakażenie HBV niezależnie od stopnia zaawansowania choroby wątroby (problem dotyczy aż 1/3 populacji), przewlekłe zakażenie HCV (w praktyce problem występuje jedynie u pacjentów z marskością wątroby), koinfekcję HBV/HCV, HBV i HCV z zakażeniem HIV oraz przyczyny niezakaźne, takie jak alkoholowa choroba wątroby, choroba stłuszczeniowa wątroby, autoimmunologiczne zapalenie wątroby (istotny wzrost liczby przypadków w ostatnich latach), hemochromatoza, niedobór 1-antytrypsyny, wrodzona tyrozynemia, α-toksyny, nikotynizm, hormony anaboliczne i estrogeny. Typowo obserwowane nakładanie się czynników istotnie zwiększa ryzyko kancerogenezy w wątrobie. Pacjent z ryzykiem rozwoju HCC wymaga stałej kompleksowej kontroli hepatologicznej, a wcześniejsze rozpoznawanie tego nowotworu zwiększa szanse na ewentualny sukces terapeutyczny, tym bardziej że obserwowany czas podwojenia masy pierwotnego raka wątroby wynosi średnio 4–5 miesięcy [1–4].

Proces powstawania HCC ma charakter złożony i wieloetapowy. Komórki wątrobowe w zdrowej wątrobie, uważane za komórki długowieczne, stosunkowo rzadko ulegają podziałom komórkowym. Inaczej sytuacja przedstawia się w wątrobie chorej. Związane z przewlekłym procesem martwiczo-zapalnym powtarzające się uszkodzenia: hepatocytów, innych komórek obecnych w miąższu wątroby oraz struktur macierzy komórkowej (extracellular matrix – ECM), prowadzą zarówno do regeneracji miąższu, jak i postępującego włóknienia i/lub przebudowy cotoangoarchitektoniki wątroby z wytworzeniem guzków rzekomych, czyli marskości wątroby. W konsekwencji przewlekłego uszkodzenia może też dojść do unieruchomienia mechanizmów apoptozy i śmierci komórek, zaburzeń interakcji pomiędzy poszczególnymi komórkami, nasilenia podziałów komórkowych w wątrobie, a więc indukcji jednej lub więcej zmian protoonkogennych.

W komórkach wysoce złośliwych HCC wykazano 50–100 proonkogennych mutacji oraz zmiany i zaburzenia licznych dróg przekazywania sygnałów w obrębie komórki (co zresztą było przyczyną wprowadzenia do praktyki klinicznej leków blokujących określone białka związane z przekazywaniem sygnałów w obrębie hepatocytów). Rak wątrobowokomórkowy podobnie jak inne nowotwory złośliwe cechuje utrata zdolności do różnicowania, zdolność do inicjowania angiogenezy, nabycie zdolności do naciekania (inwazji) oraz przerzutowania do miejsc zasiedlonych w warunkach prawidłowych przez inne komórki.

Wspólną cechą wszystkich pierwotnych nowotworów wątroby jest też nasilona angiogeneza, co umożliwia zaopatrzenie szybko rosnących tkanek guza w niezbędne czynniki odżywcze, czynniki wzrostu oraz tlen. Uważa się, że rozwój guzów powyżej 2–3 mm3 (graniczna wielkość, dla której możliwe jest odżywianie komórek na drodze prostej dyfuzji z wykorzystaniem istniejącej prawidłowej sieci naczyń) jest zależny od wytworzenia nowych naczyń. Proces patologicznej angiogenezy wiąże się z szeregiem zjawisk, takich jak: niedotlenienie komórek nowotworowych, inaktywacja genów supresorowych, aktywacja onkogenów, co prowadzi do powstania sytuacji, w której komórki nowotworowe zaczynają stale wydzielać czynniki pobudzające angiogenezę [1, 4, 5].

Diagnostyka – obecny standard diagnostyczny (zmodyfikowany w 2011 roku)

Objawy kliniczne



U większości pacjentów, szczególnie z marskością, zwykle brakuje jakichkolwiek objawów klinicznych choroby nowotworowej wątroby, a HCC wykrywa się przypadkowo w trakcie okresowych badań kontrolnych lub coraz częściej prowadzonych badań przesiewowych (o czym traktuje niniejszy artykuł). U pozostałych pacjentów z HCC może występować nagłe niewyrównanie funkcji wątroby, hipoglikemia, policytemia, hipercholesterolemia, feminizacja (u mężczyzn).

W postaci zaawansowanej, często wieloogniskowej, dominują postępujące wyniszczenie, pobolewania nadbrzusza, dyskomfort w jamie brzusznej, rzadko objawy ostrego brzucha czy wstrząsu krwotocznego (gdy guz pęknie). Oczywiście objawy kliniczne nie zawsze definiują charakter choroby wątroby, wielkość czy charakter nowotworu, dlatego też przydatność objawów klinicznych w diagnostyce HCC jest wątpliwa.



Standard diagnostyczny



Standard diagnostyczny HCC ulega w ostatnich latach stałej ewolucji [2, 6–13] i wiąże się po części z doskonaleniem technik obrazujących. Według obecnych kryteriów rozpoznanie HCC jest jednoznaczne, jeśli w jednym badaniu wizualizującym – tomografii komputerowej (computed tomography – CT) i magnetycznym rezonansie jądrowym (nuclear magnetic resonance – NMR) – wykazano guz wątroby o średnicy większej niż 2 cm, który charakteryzuje nadmierne unaczynienie w fazie tętniczej; i jednocześnie obserwuje się wypłukiwanie środka kontrastującego w fazie żylnej lub równowagi. Aktualny standard pomija więc oznaczanie α-fetoproteiny i to niezależnie od wartości stężeń, co niewątpliwie budzi wątpliwości wielu lekarzy praktyków, jak również stoi w sprzeczności z wynikami szeregu badań klinicznych.

Tak ustalone rozpoznanie nie wymaga więc potwierdzenia histopatologicznego, chyba że uzyskany obraz jest niejednoznaczny, wtedy należy wykonać biopsję guza. W znacznym odsetku przypadków ze względu na lokalizację guza lub guzów współistniejące zaburzenia krzepnięcia czy niewyrównanie funkcji wątroby, typowe dla zaawansowanej marskości, diagnostyka inwazyjna (zdaniem większości praktyków klinicystów) jest nie tylko niepotrzebna, lecz także często technicznie niemożliwa lub zbyt ryzykowna (możliwość krwawienia szczególnie przy dużych guzach i ryzyko rozsiewu komórek nowotworowych wzdłuż kanału wkłucia igły oceniane na ok. 3%), do tego obarczona ryzykiem 40% fałszywie negatywnych wyników (przy małych guzach). Ponadto z tego standardu diagnostycznego wyłamuje się rzadki histologiczny wariant raka wątrobowokomórkowego – rak włóknisto-blaszkowy (fibrolamellar HCC – FHCC), który pojawia się w wątrobie młodszych pacjentów bez marskości wątroby, rośnie ekspansywnie i w którego przebiegu nie stwierdza się też zwiększenia stężenia AFP [7, 9, 11].

O ile rozpoznanie zaawansowanej postaci HCC nie budzi wątpliwości, o tyle w przypadku pojedynczych niewielkich guzów (1–2 cm) u pacjentów z marskością wątroby nie zawsze jest możliwe jednoznaczne ustalenie rozpoznania, a przecież tylko wczesna diagnoza (rola badań przesiewowych) umożliwia radykalne leczenie, niestety też tylko w części przypadków. W przypadkach wątpliwych rozpoznanie ułatwia:

• stwierdzenie w badaniu CT (wielofazowa spiralna tomografia komputerowa) lub NMR wypłukiwania środka kontrastowego w fazie żylnej lub równowagi (różnicowanie z guzkiem dysplastycznym, guzkiem regeneracyjnym lub przetoką tętniczo-żylną),

• wykonanie badania inną techniką (przy wątpliwościach w badaniu CT należy wykonać NMR i odwrotnie) i/lub

• ocena histopatologiczna bioptatu ze zmiany (z uwzględnieniem zastrzeżeń jak wyżej), szczególnie jeśli wynik badania obrazującego jest niejednoznaczny lub atypowy [11].

W razie dalszych wątpliwości w ocenie wyników badania wizualizującego, szczególnie przy obserwowanym wzroście guza, biopsję należy powtórzyć, a pobrany materiał poddać ocenie doświadczonego w patologii wątroby histopatologa.

U pacjentów z marskością i bardzo małymi zmianami ogniskowymi < 1 cm, wykrytymi w badaniu ultrasonograficznym (USG), badanie USG należy powtarzać co 4 miesiące w pierwszym roku obserwacji, a następnie co 6 miesięcy.

Klasyfikacja Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer

Jak istotne dla losów pacjenta jest wczesne rozpoznanie HCC, świadczą dane kliniczne ujęte w najbardziej praktycznej i dalej aktualnej klasyfikacji oceny stopnia zaawansowania, oceny rokowania, a tym samym możliwości leczenia HCC, jaką jest kilkakrotnie aktualizowana od 1999 r. klasyfikacja Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC); choć stosuje się też kilka innych systemów klasyfikacyjnych [2, 11, 13].

Jedynym sposobem terapii dającym szansę na wyleczenie chorego jest wczesne wykrycie nowotworu i usunięcie go w całości poprzez wycięcie tkanki wątrobowej wraz z guzem (częściowa hepatektomia, lobektomia) lub transplantacja wątroby. Ze względu na zaawansowanie nowotworu operacje można wykonywać jedynie u mniej niż 20–30% chorych (w Polsce ok. 10%), tzn. wg klasyfikacji BCLC u chorych z bardzo wczesną (< 2 cm) lub wczesną postacią raka; w przypadku zmiany ograniczonej do jednego płata wątroby (prawidłowa czynność, brak nadciśnienia wrotnego) zaleca się jego wycięcie (margines 1 cm); w przypadku zmian bardziej zaawansowanych przy braku zajęcia dużych naczyń wskazane jest przeszczepienie wątroby. Pacjenci w stadium średnio zaawansowanym i zaawansowanym HCC nie kwalifikują się do radykalnego postępowania chirurgicznego, a średni czas przeżycia (bez leczenia) jest dramatycznie krótki i wynosi 3–6 miesięcy od momentu ustalenia rozpoznania.

Ponadto zgodnie z klasyfikacją Milano stwierdzenie jednego ogniska HCC > 5 cm lub więcej niż 3 zmian, nie większych od 3 cm, nawet bez marskości wątroby, powoduje w przypadku większości pacjentów odstąpienie od radykalnego leczenia chirurgicznego. Również guzy mniejsze przy niekorzystnej lokalizacji (np. przywnękowe) często nie kwalifikują się do postępowania zabiegowego. Dopiero od niedawna pojawiły się szersze możliwości wykonywania zabiegów paliatywnych i/lub terapia lekami blokującymi drogi sygnałowe w obrębie tkanek guza, jak również angiogenezę (dotychczas zarejestrowany jedynie sorafenib) u osób niekwalifikujących się do leczenia radykalnego [7–13].

Możliwości wczesnego wykrywania raka wątrobowokomórkowego

Wytyczne dotyczące badań przesiewowych w kierunku HCC są bardzo podobne wg standardów większości znanych towarzystw naukowych: Europejskiego Towarzystwa Badań nad Wątrobą (European Association for the Study of the Liver – EASL) i Europejskiej Organizacji na rzecz Badań i Leczenia Raka (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer – EORTC), Brytyjskiego Towarzystwa Gastroenterologicznego (British Society of Gastroenterology – BSG), Japońskiego Towarzystwa Hepatologicznego (Japanese Society of Hepatology – JSG), Amerykańskiego Towarzystwa Badań nad Wątrobą (American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases – AASLD) [2, 7–13], choć ulegają systematycznej ewolucji.

W celu wczesnego wykrycia HCC, co umożliwia radykalne postępowanie terapeutyczne, u pacjentów dorosłych zaliczanych do grup szczególnego ryzyka rozwoju HCC [11] (z marskością wątroby niezależnie od etiologii – w stopniu zaawansowania A i B w skali Childa-Pougha; z marskością wątroby niezależnie od etiologii – w stopniu zaawansowania C w skali Childa-Pougha, oczekujących na przeszczepienie wątroby; z przewlekłym zapaleniem wątroby, ale z rodzinnym wywiadem w kierunku HCC; u pacjentów z przewlekłym zapaleniem wątroby zakażonych HCV i włóknieniem minimum F3 oraz wg niektórych doniesień u zakażonych HBV we wczesnym dzieciństwie lub od wielu lat) zaleca się wykonywanie co 6 miesięcy badania USG jamy brzusznej (AASLD, EASL) [10, 11]. Stosowane od wielu lat w diagnostyce przesiewowej HCC badanie stężenia AFP co 6 miesięcy zostało w najnowszych standardach pominięte z uwagi na ostatecznie wysoki koszt tak prowadzonych badań przesiewowych przy jedynie 6–8-procentowym zwiększeniu liczby nowo wykrytych przypadków wczesnego HCC (przy znacznym odsetku wyników fałszywie dodatnich), jeśli oznaczanie stężeń AFP prowadzono równolegle z badaniem USG. Wykazano, że oznaczanie stężenia AFP w diagnostyce HCC charakteryzuje poziom cut-off 20 ng/ml, czułość 39–64%, swoistość 76–91% i wartość predykcyjna 9–42%.

Z kolei rutynowe badanie USG charakteryzuje czułość 65–80%, swoistość 90%, ale w przypadku zmian wczesnych badanie to jest swoiste jedynie w 30%. Ponadto ostateczny wynik zależy od doświadczenia i umiejętności osoby wykonującej badanie oraz jakości sprzętu. A więc margines błędu jest w dalszym ciągu duży, dlatego też poszukuje się nowych nieinwazyjnych testów i metod umożliwiających wczesną diagnostykę HCC.

U pacjentów ze zmianą ogniskową wykrytą w badaniu USG i/lub – jak w standardach z lat poprzednich – po stwierdzeniu zwiększonych wartości stężeń AFP należy bezwzględnie wykonać badanie CT jamy brzusznej z kontrastem i/lub NMR jako badanie weryfikujące rozpoznanie HCC oraz, jeśli to możliwe, pobrać bioptat wątroby w celu potwierdzenia procesu nowotworowego. Rozpoznanie i różnicowanie wczesnych postaci HCC ułatwia ocena histochemiczna bioptatu (Survivin, LYVE-1) [14–18].

Znaczniki serologiczne przydatne w diagnostyce raka wątrobowokomórkowego – krytyczna ocena

-fetoproteina jest glikoproteiną produkowaną w warunkach fizjologicznych przez wątrobę i woreczek żółtkowy w okresie płodowym. Choć w diagnostyce HCC jest stosowana najczęściej, to niestety nie jest specyficzna wyłącznie dla HCC. Jej zwiększone stężenie w surowicy stwierdza się również:

• u zdrowych ciężarnych,

• u pacjentów z guzami jądra (nasieniak, potworniak), z rakiem zarodkowym, gruczolakorakiem płuca, przewodu pokarmowego lub jajnika (hepatoid cancers), w przebiegu pierwotnego raka wywodzącego się z nabłonka dróg żółciowych (cholangiocellular carcinoma – CCC),

• w przebiegu ostrej lub przewlekłej choroby wątroby (np. związanej z zakażeniem HBV czy HCV), której towarzyszą intensywne procesy regeneracyjne,

• u chorych z przerzutami raka gruczołowego do wątroby,

• w marskości powikłanej zespołem wątrobowo-nerkowym,

• w niealkoholowym stłuszczeniowym zapaleniu wątroby,

• w niewydolności nerek.

Istnieją też doniesienia o zmniejszeniu się stężenia AFP u pacjentów z zakażeniem HCV, poddanych skutecznej terapii przeciwwirusowej [2, 9, 13–15, 17–19].

Niemniej udowodniono, że:

• stwierdzenie stężenia AFP > 400 ng/ml umożliwia jednoznaczne rozpoznanie HCC w przypadku obecności charakterystycznych cech w badaniu obrazowym,

• stwierdzenie stężenia AFP > 500 ng/ml u chorego z marskością wątroby, niezależnie od etiologii jest równoznaczne z rozpoznaniem HCC – swoistość badania wynosi 100% (niemniej pominięte w obowiązujących obecnie standardach diagnostycznych),

• systematyczny wzrost stężenia AFP (> 20 ng/ml) u chorych z marskością wątroby w 2–3 kolejnych badaniach budzi podejrzenie HCC (nawet w sytuacji nieobecności guza w badaniach obrazujących),

• ponowne zwiększenie stężenia AFP po leczeniu chirurgicznym należy wiązać ze wznową guza lub powstaniem nowego ogniska (po usunięciu guza dochodzi do szybkiego zmniejszenia stężenia AFP – czas półtrwania wynosi 3,4–5 dni),

• istnieje korelacja stężenia AFP z wielkością guza; stężenie AFP > 400 ng/ml – duże guzy, zlokalizowane w obu płatach wątroby, naciekające żyłę wrotną,

• duże stężenie AFP koreluje z gorszym rokowaniem,

• wartość AFP > 1000 ng/ml stanowi wskaźnik złego rokowania.

Oznaczanie AFP w diagnostyce przesiewowej tego nowotworu budzi jednakże szereg wątpliwości, ponieważ nie wszystkie HCC wydzielają AFP (do 40% chorych, szczególnie u pacjentów z marskością alkoholową, oraz oczywiście pacjenci z wariantem HCC, jakim jest rak włóknisto-blaszkowy), nie ma ścisłej korelacji stężenia AFP z histopatologicznym zaawansowaniem i zróżnicowaniem HCC, zwiększone stężenie AFP obserwuje się częściej u pacjentów z HCC rozwijającym się na podłożu pozapalnej marskości związanej z HCV niż marskości alkoholowej.

Podsumowując – prawidłowe stężenie AFP nie wyklucza HCC, a oznaczanie AFP nie spełnia kryteriów czułego testu diagnostycznego w wykrywaniu HCC, swoistość diagnostyczna AFP jest również ograniczona. Wykazano, że wraz ze wzrostem progowej wartości stężenia AFP maleje czułość i rośnie swoistość diagnostyczna. Przy wartościach stężenia ≥ 200 ng/ml, czułość wynosi 22%, przy wysokiej swoistości [7, 15, 18, 19].

Z uwagi na niedoskonałości oznaczania stężeń AFP w diagnostyce wczesnych postaci raka wątrobowokomórkowego poszukuje się innych diagnostycznych i prognostycznych markerów serologicznych HCC, które omówiono pokrótce niżej.

Frakcja L3 AFP (AFP-L3) – reaguje z aglutyniną otrzymywaną z Lens culinaris; jest obecna w HCC również przy prawidłowych stężeniach konwencjonalnej AFP. Jednak nadal ta technika diagnostyczna jest czasochłonna i nie znalazła szerszego zastosowania praktycznego. W praktyce klinicznej uznano za szczególnie przydatny wskaźnik AFP-L3 (total AFP), który koreluje z zaawansowaniem HCC [15].

Des--karboksyprotrombina (DCP, PIVKA II) – odmiana protrombiny produkowanej bez udziału witaminy K, przez nowotworowo zmienione hepatocyty, niezależnie od suplementacji witaminy K. Liebmana i wsp. [20] wykazali po raz pierwszy, że stężenie surowicze tego związku było zwiększone u 69 spośród 76 chorych na HCC, czułość wynosiła 53–89%, a specyficzność 59–84%.

Stwierdzane u osób z HCC średnie stężenie DCP wynosiło 900 ng/ml i było zdecydowanie większe od zakresu 10–42 ng/ml, obserwowanego u osób z przewlekłym zapaleniem wirusowym oraz przerzutami gruczolakoraka do wątroby. Dlatego też wysunięto postulat do tej pory niewprowadzony w życie w większości krajów, by w diagnostyce przesiewowej HCC jednocześnie oznaczać DCP i AFP [15, 16, 18, 20].

W pojedynczych doniesieniach oceniono przydatność innych białek (np. PIVKA VII, IX, X, białko C, S, osteokalcyna) indukowanych niedoborem witaminy K w diagnostyce wczesnych postaci HCC. Niemniej obserwacje te do chwili obecnej nie mają istotnego przełożenia na praktykę kliniczną [15].

-L-fukozydaza (AFU) – jest syntetyzowana przez inne komórki niż AFP i mogłaby być w przyszłości dogodnym testem uzupełniającym u osób z podejrzanymi zmianami ogniskowymi w wątrobie (badania w toku) [21].

Rozpuszczalna postać glipikanu 3 (sGPC-3) – stężenie > 2 ng/ml wykazuje 51-procentową czułość i 90-procentową specyficzność w diagnostyce HCC. Wykazano, że jego jednoczesne oznaczanie z AFP zwiększa czułość do 72%. Związek ten wydaje się obiecującym biomarkerem w różnicowaniu guzków dysplastycznych i wczesnych postaci HCC < 3 cm! [15].

Ponadto w trakcie badań (niestety dostępne są pojedyncze doniesienia, a przydatność nieustalona) znajdują się: izoenzymy -glutamylotranspeptydazy (GGTP), transformujący czynnik wzrostu (transforming growth factor 1 – TGF-1), przeciwciała anty-p53, Golgi fosfoproteina 2 (GOLPH2/GP73), insulinopodobny czynnik wzrostu 1 (insulin-like growth factor 1 – IGF-1), IGF-2, ludzki czynnik wzrostu hepatocytów (hepatocyte growth factor – HGF), chitotriozydaza, czynnik wzrostu śródbłonka naczyniowego (vascular endothelial growth factor – VEGF) i zasadowy czynnik wzrostu fibroblastów (basic fibroblast growth factor – bFGF) (VEGF > 240 pg/ml – niezależny czynnik złego rokowania HCC) [18, 22–24].

Krążący microRNA-21 – wykazano, że stężenie microRNA-21 jest znamiennie większe u pacjentów z HCC w porównaniu z pacjentami z przewlekłym wirusowym zapaleniem wątroby (czułość 61,1% i swoistość 83,3%), jak też znamiennie większe u pacjentów z HCC w porównaniu z pacjentami zdrowymi (czułość 87,3% i swoistość 92,0%). Ponadto wykazano, że stężenie tego znacznika w surowicy znamiennie zmniejsza się przy skutecznej resekcji HCC. Są to niezmiernie interesujące i nowatorskie obserwacje, choć na praktyczne oznaczanie microRNA-21 w diagnostyce przesiewowej HCC trzeba będzie poczekać jeszcze wiele lat [25].

Znaczniki tkankowe a diagnostyka raka wątrobowokomórkowego

Znaczniki tkankowe nie są przydatne w diagnostyce przesiewowej HCC, niemniej mogą być niezmiernie pomocne w diagnostyce różnicowej. Detekcja wybranych mRNA w tkance wątrobowej pozwala na precyzyjną ocenę ryzyka rozwoju pierwotnego raka wątroby i teoretycznie (sic!) umożliwia wykrycie pojedynczych mikroprzerzutów, a także wtórnych guzów. Analiza ekspresji AFP jest przyjmowana za „złoty standard” w diagnostyce HCC zarówno na poziomie ekspresji białka, jak i mRNA; stężenie mRNA AFP koreluje z rozmiarem guza i stężeniem surowiczej AFP oraz obecnością przerzutów pozawątrobowych.

Podobne znaczenie ma mRNA GPC-3. Ekspresja glipikanu 3 w hepatocytach jest bardzo mała albo wręcz nieobecna w przypadku hiperplazji czy marskości, ale zwiększona 5–10-krotnie w 75–80% przypadków HCC w porównaniu ze zdrową tkanką otaczającą guz. Jest więc to marker tkankowy umożliwiający wczesne wykrywanie HCC! Obecnie trwają też intensywne badania nad nowymi swoistymi i charakterystycznymi markerami dla różnych nowotworów obserwowanych w miąższu wątroby (istotne znaczenie w diagnostyce wczesnej i różnicowej) [15, 26].

Badania obrazujące

Niewątpliwie ostatnie lata cechuje ogromny postęp w rozwoju nowoczesnych badań obrazujących. Techniki te omówiono w szeregu publikacji, także w języku polskim, i nie są ujęte w tym opracowaniu [6–13].

Podsumowanie

1. W dotychczasowych badaniach żaden z wymienionych znaczników nie przewyższał swoistości diagnostycznej AFP.

2. Większość proponowanych znaczników serologicznych ma większą swoistość dla zaawansowanych postaci, o dużej średnicy ognisk HCC, a więc tych postaci, które nie kwalifikują się do leczenia radykalnego.

3. Żaden z omówionych wyżej znaczników nie spełnia kryteriów badania przesiewowego i nie nadaje się do wczesnego wykrywania, tzw. surveillance HCC.

4. Obecnie stosowane we wczesnej diagnostyce HCC znaczniki (AFP, AFP-L3, DCP) są suboptymalne dla rutynowej praktyki klinicznej.

5. Przyszłość diagnostyki przesiewowej prawdopodobnie należy do kombinacji znaczników (panele diagnostyczne) równocześnie stosowanych z nowoczesnymi, ale też tanimi metodami obrazującymi. Zestawy diagnostyczne powinny obejmować związki z odmiennych, niezależnych dróg patofizjologicznych transformacji nowotworowej, co gwarantuje wyższą dokładność diagnostyczną.

Piśmiennictwo

 1. Gomaa AI, Khan SA, Toledano MB, Waked I, Taylor-Robinson SD. Hepatocellular carcinoma: epidemiology, risk factors and pathogenesis. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14: 4300-8.

 2. Kompendium postępowania w nowotworach wątroby. Simon K, Krzemieniecki K (red.). Termedia, Poznań 2012.

 3. But DY, Lai CL, Yuen MF. Natural history of hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14: 1652-6.

 4. Schirmacher P. Molecular mechanism of human hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatol Intl 2010; 4 1 suppl: S45-S7.

 5. Dragani T. Risk of HCC: genetic heterogeneity and complex gene-tics. J Hepatol 2010; 52: 252-7.

 6. European Association For The Study Of The Liver. EASL Clinical practice guidelines: management of chronic hepatitis B virus infection. J Hepatol 2012; 57: 167-85.

 7. De Lope RC, Tremosini S, Forner A, Reig M, Briux J. Management of HCC. J Hepatol 2012; 56 (1 suppl): S75-S87.

 8. Ryder SD; British Society of Gastroenterology. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in adults. Gut 2003; 52 Suppl 3: iii1-8.

 9. Bialecki E, Di Bisceglie AM. Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. HPB (Oxford) 2005; 7: 26-34.

10. Bruix J, Sherman M; American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma: an update. Hepatology 2011; 53: 1020-2.

11. European Association For The Study Of The Liver; European Organisation For Research And Treatment Of Cancer. EASL-EORTC clinical practice guidelines: management of hepatocellular carcinoma. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 908-43.

12. Szurowska E, Nowicki T, Studniarek M. Diagnostyka obrazowa raka pierwotnego wątroby. Onkol Prakt Klin 2011; 7: 73-83.

13. Małkowski P, Wasiak D, Czerwiński J. Rekomendacje dotyczące rozpoznania i leczenia raka wątrobowokomórkowego. Medical Science Review Hepatologia 2009; 4: 27-33.

14. Zhang BH, Yang BH, Tang ZY. Randomized controlled trial of screening for hepatocellular carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 2004; 130: 417-22.

15. Wang H. Biomarkers for the diagnosis of HCC. Hepatol Int 2010; 4 (Suppl 1): S77-80.

16. Madaliński K, Jończyk M, Rybczyńska J, Wawrzynowicz-Syczewska M, Boroń-Kaczmarska A. Serological markers for hepatocellular carcinoma – modern trends. Cent Eur J Immunol 2005; 30: 32-5.

17. Marrero JA. Screening tests for hepatocellular carcinoma. Clin Liver Dis 2005; 9: 235-51.

18. International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular NeoplasiaThe International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular Neoplasia. Pathologic diagnosis of early hepatocellular carcinoma: a report of the international consensus group for hepatocellular neoplasia. Hepatology 2009; 49: 658-64.

19. Di Bisceglie AM, Sterling RK, Chung RT, et al. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels in patients with advanced hepatitis C: results from the HALT-C Trial. J Hepatol 2005; 43: 434-41.

20. Liebman HA, Furie BC, Tong MJ, Blanchard RA, Lo KJ, Lee SD, Coleman MS, Furie B. Des-gamma-carboxy (abnormal) prothrombin as a serum marker of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. N Engl J Med 1984; 310: 1427-31.

21. Takahashi H, Saibara T, Iwamura S, Tomita A, Maeda T, Onishi S, Yamamoto Y, Enzan H. Serum alpha-L-fucosidase activity and tumor size in hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatology 1994; 19: 1414-7.

22. Kew MC, Wolf P, Whittaker D, Rowe P. Tumour-associated isoenzymes of gamma-glutamyl transferase in the serum of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Br J Cancer 1984; 50: 451-5.

23. Tsai JF, Jeng JE, Chuang LY, et al. Clinical evaluation of urinary transforming growth factor-beta1 and serum alpha-fetoprotein as tumour markers of hepatocellular carcinoma. Br J Cancer 1997; 75: 1460-6.

24. Villa E, Colantoni A, Cammà C, Grottola A, Buttafoco P, Gelmini R, Ferretti I, Manenti F. Estrogen receptor classification for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with clinical staging systems. J Clin Oncol 2003; 21: 441-6.

25. Tomimaru Y, Eguchi H, Nagano H, et al. Circulating microRNA-21 as a novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 167-75.

26. Stokowska A, Stalke P, Bielawski KP. Molecular markers of micrometastasis in the blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Postępy Hig Med Dośw 2007; 61: 310-9.



Adres do korespondencji



Krzysztof Simon




Zakład Chorób Zakaźnych i Hepatologii

Uniwersytet Medyczny we Wrocławiu

ul. Koszarowa 5

51-149 Wrocław

tel. +48 71 326 13 25

faks +48 71 325 52 42



Praca wpłynęła: 15.08.2012

Zaakceptowano do druku: 10.09.2012
Copyright: © 2012 Termedia Sp. z o. o. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
Quick links
© 2019 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe