eISSN: 1689-3530
ISSN: 0867-4361
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction/Alkoholizm i Narkomania
Current issue Archive Articles in press About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
1/2020
vol. 33
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
Review article

The effect of ethanol on the mechanisms of liver antioxidant defence – a review of rodent model studies

Aleksandra Kołota
1

1.
The Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Department of Dietetics, Warsaw, Poland
Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33 (1): 79-94
Online publish date: 2020/06/09
Article file
- AIN-Kolota.pdf  [0.40 MB]
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

The liver is a multifunctional organ, and the neutralisation of harmful compounds like ethanol and its metabolites is one of the most important. During these reactions, free radicals are produced and under normal conditions there is a balance between their production and elimination by antioxidant substances, neutralising free radicals thus maintaining the oxidative-antioxidant balance in the liver [1]. When this balance is disrupted we have a condition defined as oxidative stress, which may arise as a result of many factors, including inadequate diet, consumption of alcoholic beverages, drug use and exposure to environmental pollutants like heavy metals. Excessive amounts of free radicals impair the efficiency of antioxidant defence mechanisms by decreasing their productivity which causes damage mainly to hepatocytes where the free radicals arise [2]. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the physical aging process and pathogenesis of many diseases including cardiovascular, chronic kidney and neurodegenerative diseases [3] as well as alcoholic liver disease or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis [4]. In order to protect cells against free radicals, systems covering the action of two types of antioxidants have been created in the body: antioxidant enzymes (e.g. catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) and low molecular-weight substances (α-tocopherol, β-carotene, vitamin C, glutathione, flavonoids). Antioxidants operate by preventing the formation of free radicals, their inactivation, and also by repairing damaged cells [5]. Thanks to these properties, antioxidant substances have also found application in the treatment of liver diseases, while in recent years the main direction of research has been to determine the therapeutic effect of antioxidant substances found in plants [4]. Given that alcohol consumption is increasing in many countries [6], understanding mechanism of the effect of ethanol on liver antioxidant defence may support the planning of therapy for those with damage to this organ caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

The study aim was to document, on the bases of the available literature, the effect of ethanol consumption on selected parameters of liver antioxidant defence considered in rodent model studies and to explain the mechanisms of enzymatic and non-enzymatic liver antioxidant defence.

Review of literature

The effect of ethanol on superoxide dismutase activity The main antioxidant enzyme is superoxide dismutase (SOD), which catalyses the dismutation reaction of the highly toxic superoxide radical anion to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, thanks to which the level of the compound does not exceed levels sufficient to cause cell damage [7]. The active SOD centre may contain metals like copper in combination with zinc, iron, manganese and nickel, which is the basis for distinguishing four groups of so-called SOD metalloenzymes [8]. With age, the natural resources of SOD in the body decrease [9] and it was observed that, although the level of SOD protein in the liver of older rats was significantly lower than in young individuals, enzyme activity did not differ significantly between groups [10]. The use of a binge drinking model in adolescent rats, by intraperitoneal administration of 20% ethanol solution, caused a significant increase of SOD activity in the liver, which, according to the authors, indicates an increase in oxidative stress probably as a result of secretion after injection of cortisol (stress hormone) [11]. An increase of SOD activity in the liver was also noted by Das and Vasudevan [12], who gave rats ethanol in doses of 1.2 to 2 g/kg body mass. Increasing the activity of this enzyme may indicate the pro-oxidative effect of ethanol, i.e. the increased free-radical production as a result of its metabolism [13].

In another experiment, young rats voluntarily consumed 10% ethanol solution for 2, 4 or 6 weeks, which did not affect the SOD activity in the liver [14], as was the case for adult rats receiving 12% ethanol solution for 6 weeks [15]. It can be suspected that the ethanol concentration was too low to cause changes in SOD activity. In other experiments using laboratory animals, a decrease in liver SOD activity was noted, compared to control groups, both as a result of short one-hour exposure to various doses of ethanol (2, 4 to 6 g/kg body mass) [16], and longer exposure to it, namely administration of ethanol for a month at a dose of 4 g/kg body mass (18% solution) [17], 6 g/kg body mass/day [18], or 7 g/kg body mass/day [19]. Reduced SOD activity may affect the reduction of cellular efficiency in free radical detoxification, thus leading to increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, as confirmed in numerous studies [18-22].

A decrease in SOD activity was also observed at higher ethanol solution concentrations: 20% [23, 24], 30% [25, 26], 35% [27], as well as 40% [28] and 50% [22]. According to Scott et al. [16], SOD activity may have decreased because of the inactivation of this enzyme by free radicals produced in the liver during ethanol metabolism and the observed changes reflect insufficient liver capacity to remove free radicals, which leads to oxidative stress.

It is also worth emphasising that the method of administering ethanol to rats was different, because high concentrations of ethanol were most often administered intragastrically. This causes inflammation and erosions in the stomach wall [29-31], undoubtedly also changing the profile of antioxidant defence, which may be associated with cortisol secretion. In addition, the procedure for inducing alcoholic liver damage in rats is the administration of 30% alcohol solution (7 g/kg body mass) once a day for 28 days [32]. Using this procedure will not only lead to morphological changes in the organ, but also to changes in the activity or level of markers of antioxidant defence in the liver.

The effect of ethanol on catalase activity

Catalase is an enzyme that acts together with SOD as it decomposes hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water molecules, also exhibiting peroxidase activity in the oxidation of organic compounds like ethanol, methanol or formate, associated with the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water [33]. A single exposure to increasing doses of ethanol (2, 4 or 6 g ethanol/kg body mass) did not cause differences in the activity of this enzyme in the liver [16], which can also be explained by the insufficient amount of ethanol the metabolism of which did not cause excessive production of hydrogen peroxide, which is the main activator of peroxidase catalase activity [16]. Other authors’ experience indicates that acute ethanol intoxication causes a significant increase of catalase activity in liver in both young rats [11] and adult mice [34], contributing to increased oxidation of lipids and proteins in the liver. Prolonged alcohol consumption increases the activity of this enzyme in the liver [35], which is confirmed by the results of experiments by Radic et al. [15] using a 12% ethanol solution in rats, and Oh et al. [36] using a diet of which 36% of energy value was ethyl alcohol. High alcohol concentration leads to an increase in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a result of the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde, and in addition, hydrogen peroxide is formed during ethanol transformation. Excessive amounts of both of these compounds may increase peroxidase activity of catalase, which leads to a decrease in said enzyme substrate concentration. This may explain the increase in catalase activity observed in the above studies as a result of the consumption of ethanol.

In turn, the results of other studies indicate a decrease in catalase activity as a result of prolonged exposure to ethanol e.g. for 4 weeks at doses of 5, 8, 10 and 12 g/kg body mass [37], an 18% solution at a dose of 4 g/kg body mass [17] and a 20% solution at a dose of 7.9 g/kg body mass [24] or a 30% solution [25]. Similar effects were observed when the exposure to 30% ethanol solution was extended to 3 months [26] and when administering more concentrated ethanol solutions as 35% [20, 27], 40% [28], or 50% [22]. Also, the intragastric ethanol administration to rats (7 g/kg body mass) resulted in a significant decrease in catalase activity [19], during which the animals were exposed to strong stressors, which probably changed the body’s response, manifesting, among other things, a reduction of catalase activity. Bindu and Annamalai [17] explain the reduced activity of catalase as a result of the harmful effects of free radicals produced in the course of ethanol transformation or the direct impact of acetaldehyde resulting from the ethanol oxidation. In turn, Popovic et al. [38] believe that a decrease in catalase activity as a result of exposure to ethanol leads to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which may contribute to the intensification of lipid oxidation processes as well as tissue damage.

Based on the above-mentioned studies, it is difficult to unequivocally determine the impact of ethanol consumption on catalase activity, although most reports indicate that in animals using ethanol the activity of this enzyme is lower than in animals not exposed to it.

The effect of ethanol on glutathione level

Glutathione is a co-factor for the antioxidant enzymes: glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione transferase, and also participates in the elimination of free radicals and regeneration of other antioxidants (vitamins C and E) as well as in the repair of damaged cell elements (proteins, cell membrane lipids, DNA) [5, 39]. Glutathione synthesis takes place in all cells, but the highest concentration is in the liver, from which it is released into the blood and bile. It occurs in reduced or oxidised form, and the concentration ratio of both these forms is an indicator of the oxidative-reductive balance of the cellular environment [40]. The reduced form of glutathione dominates in the cell, however the thiol group easily undergoes oxidation processes with the participation of glutathione peroxidase catalysing the reduction of hydrogen peroxide or organic peroxides. Glutathione disulfide, which is harmful to cells, is formed in this reaction, and can form disulfides with proteins containing thiol groups and oxidise them. Therefore in order to its elimination its reduction takes place in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and glutathione reductase [33, 41]. The main function of glutathione is to maintain thiol protein groups in a reduced state, thus ensuring their functional activity [42].

Studies on the hepatotoxicity of ethanol have shown that long-term alcohol intoxication reduces the glutathione concentration in mitochondria. Then transport of ethanol from the cytoplasm is limited, so the ability of cells to reduce glutathione is decreased. In turn it contributes to the accumulation of its oxidised form in the cytosol which is removed from the cell or reacts with thiol groups of proteins causing a decrease in intracellular glutathione concentration. This leads to oxidative damage to hepatocytes and the entire organ [43]. Alcohol consumption depletes glutathione resources and contributes to reduction of the body’s antioxidant capacity [44] while the reduction of glutathione resources by over 20% weakens cellular defence mechanisms against free radicals and causes damages of hepatocytes [45]. Therefore determining the degree of glutathione resources depletion in the liver may provide an indicator of damage to this organ caused by alcohol consumption.

Study on young female rats receiving a 10% ethanol solution over a longer period of time, reveal significantly reduced total glutathione levels in the liver compared to control females [46, 47], although it should be noted that susceptibility to liver damage is much higher in females than in males [48]. Other authors [49-52] also point to a decrease in glutathione concentration as a result of alcohol consumption from a single administration of increasing doses of ethanol [16], and also after prolonged exposure to various concentrations of ethanol at 18% [17], 20% [24], 30% [25, 26] and 35% [20, 27]. The reason for the observed changes may be the binding of acetaldehyde by glutathione, which leads to a decrease in the level of the latter. In addition, the higher glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity observed in ethanol consuming rats may indicate an increase in these enzymes’ utilisation of glutathione [17]. A decrease in the concentration of glutathione leads to the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and thus possibly causing an increase in the activity of catalase, which at high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide takes over the detoxifying function of glutathione peroxidase [38, 53]. In turn, according to Łuczaj et al. [54], increasing the level of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides contributes not only to lowering glutathione concentration, but also to reducing glutathione peroxidase activity.

It is worth mentioning that depletion of intracellular glutathione resources may affect not only the liver but also other organs as well, e.g. the brain [55]. In the opinion of some researchers, high-dose ethanol exposure causes changes in the endogenous thiol pool, which is associated with the induction of stress proteins in various areas of the liver and brain [56]. According to Zhou et al. [57], reconstitution of glutathione resources by increasing the body’s antioxidant capacity may inhibit ethanol liver damage that can find potential application in the treatment of people with alcoholic liver disease.

The effect of ethanol on glutathione-dependent enzyme activity

Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), like catalase, reduces hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water molecules, and due to the greater affinity for this compound, it is responsible for the catabolism of most of the hydrogen peroxide formed in cells [58]. In addition, GPx plays a dominant role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide at its low concentrations, and when its concentration increases, this function is taken over by catalase [59]. GPx, together with glutathione reductase, maintains the intracellular oxidative-reductive status in balance [60]. A single dose of various concentrations of ethanol (2, 4 or 6 g/kg body mass) administered intragastrically to rats did not cause significant differences in GPx activity [16]. GPx plays a key role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide at low concentrations, which is why the observed lack of activity change may mean that hydrogen peroxide resulting from ethanol metabolism was effectively removed in young rats. At the same time, intraperitoneal administration of a strong ethanol solution causes peritoneal inflammation, and an increase in GPx activity is one of its consequences, which is confirmed by the results of an experiment conducted by Oh et al. [61]. Also, the administration of ethanol to rats over a longer period of time leads to a significant increase in GPx activity in the liver [17], which may be the defence mechanism against excess free radicals. Other researchers assessing the effect of long-term administration of ethanol on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, observed in relation to control animals, significantly lower GPx activity in the liver, regardless of the ethanol solution concentration and mode of administration (per os, oral tube, intragastrically, intraperitoneally) [18-20, 25-28, 37]. The decrease in the activity of this enzyme as a result of prolonged exposure to alcohol may be associated with exhaustion or inactivation of this enzyme by reactive oxygen species, excessive amounts of which are formed in the course of ethanol transformation [62]. It should also be emphasised that the body’s response mechanism may be different when the ethanol solution, in addition to its high concentration, is applied directly to the stomach (which can damage mucosa and lead to inflammation), and different in a low ethanol concentration model.

Glutathione reductase (GR) occurs in cytoplasm and mitochondria, and its main function is to maintain the intracellular correct concentration of reduced glutathione by converting oxidised glutathione to its reduced derivative with simultaneous oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. This enzyme, together with GPx, the activity of which depends on the ratio of reduced form to oxidised glutathione, maintains the balance of intracellular oxidative-reductive status [60]. In the course of reactions catalysed by both these enzymes, the level of total glutathione does not change [63]. In contrast, lowering the level of the reduced form of glutathione leads to the accumulation of significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which can cause cell damage, while an excess of the oxidised form of glutathione can inhibit enzyme activity [64]. In the available literature, the results of studies on the effect of ethanol on GR activity are contradictory. On the one hand, there were no changes in the GR activity in rats liver after a single administration of ethanol solution [16]. On the other hand, there was a significant decrease in its activity observed after a single administration of 30% ethanol in relation to the control group [61]. Probably the decrease in activity resulted from the action of a strong stress factor, which in this case was the high ethanol solution concentration. In turn, higher GR activity was found during long-term administration of increasing ethanol solution concentrations to rats (5, 8, 10 and 12 g/kg body mass) [28] or 40% ethanol solution [37]. The increase in GR activity intensifies the processes of glutathione reuse, so that detoxification of xenobiotics is more effective [36]. In the experiment by Ojeda et al. [65] conducted on young rats that were exposed to a 20% ethanol solution during the foetal period and during lactation, a higher GR activity was observed than in the control group. According to the authors, it may indicate the adaptation of cells to oxidative stress towards maintaining normal levels of glutathione or decreasing the amount of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, the level of which increases as a result of exposure to ethanol. Augustyniak et al. [66] demonstrated a much higher level of glutathione as a result of a five-week period of ethanol-rich diet in rats (representing 36% of the diet’s energy value). In addition, the authors observed a significantly higher GR activity in rats on a diet supplemented by ethanol for 5 weeks compared to the control group. In this case, an increase in GR activity and glutathione levels in the liver may also be a manifestation of the cell adaptation to oxidative stress. What is more, a consequence of excessive consumption of ethanol are niacin deficiencies, which may amplify the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Niacin deficit in organism may also lead to a decrease in the level of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, and this in turn may contribute to a decrease in GR activity and glutathione level [67].

Conclusions

The presence of ethanol is one of the factors inducing the production of free radicals, with the liver being the organ that is particularly vulnerable to their effects. The impact of ethanol on the parameters of antioxidant defence is a complex issue, as there is no single pattern of change that occurs as a result of ethanol consumption. This study attempts to analyse changes in antioxidant defence parameters based on available literature. There are few experiments in which only the effect of ethanol is analysed as most studies have a broader focus and include the action of other harmful substances like tobacco smoke in combination with exposure to ethanol [17], or the action of substances potentially protecting against, or countering, the effects of exposure to ethanol [15, 28, 32]. In summary, the consumption of ethanol over a longer period of time contributed to a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione resources, an increase in the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), while in the case of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), both the increase and decrease of the activity of these enzymes were noted. It is possible that this was influenced by different experimental conditions, varying doses and concentrations of the ethanol solution administered, exposure time, age and sex of animals, and the method of ethanol administration, which makes interpretation of the results difficult. It is worth noting that the observed relationships may have been affected by the applied animal models designed to reflect binge drinking, alcohol dependence or stages of alcoholic liver disease [68]. In addition, chronic consumption of ethanol blocks the liver’s regeneration processes, which is still a poorly understood issue [69], though it is known that liver regeneration capacity decreases with age [70]. This may also be the case with the effectiveness of antioxidant defence mechanisms, as Yang et al. [10] showed changes in the activity of liver catalase and SOD are age-related. Furthermore, although the available literature is dominated by male rat and mice experiments, it is worth emphasising that, on the one hand, females are more susceptible to damage caused by alcohol consumption [48] and on the other, they are less susceptible to oxidative stress [71].

It seems necessary to conduct further research not only related to changes in the activity/concentration of compounds involved in antioxidant defence, but also to deepen knowledge of these compounds’ properties and possibilities of their therapeutic use. Indeed, there are premises for the use of SOD in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, neurodegenerative diseases or diabetes [8], though as yet there is no data suggesting any such possibilities in liver diseases caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

Conflict of interest

None declared.

Financial support

None declared

Ethics

The work described in this article has been carried out in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) on medical research involving human subjects, EU Directive (210/63/EU) on protection of animals used for scientific purposes, Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals and the ethical principles defined in the Farmington Consensus of 1997.

References

1. Casas-Grajales S, Muriel P. Antioxidants in liver health. World J Gastrointest Pharmacol Ther 2015; 6: 59-72.
2. Jadeja RN, Devkar RV, Nammi S. Oxidative stress in liver diseases: pathogenesis, prevention, and therapeutics. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2017; 8341286.
3. Liguori I, Russo G, Curcio F, Bulli G, Aran L, Della-Morte D, et al. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clin Interv Aging 2018; 13: 757-72.
4. Li S, Tan HY, Wang N, Zhang ZJ, Lao L, Wong CW, et al. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in liver diseases. Int J Mol Sci 2015; 16: 26087-124.
5. Arauz J, Ramos-Tovar E, Muriel P. Redox state and methods to evaluate oxidative stress in liver damage: From bench to bedside. Ann Hepatol 2016; 15: 160-73.
6. Zima T. Alcohol abuse. EJIFCC 2018; 29(4): 285-89.
7. Wang Y, Branicky R, Noë A, Hekimi S. Superoxide dismutases: Dual roles in controlling ROS damage and regulating ROS signaling. J Cell Biol 2018; 217: 1915-28.
8. Younus H. Therapeutic potentials of superoxide dismutase. Int J Health Sci (Qassim) 2018; 12(3): 88-93. 9. Inal ME, Kanbak G, Sunal E. Antioxidant enzyme activities and malondialdehyde levels related to aging. Clin Chim Acta 2001; 305: 75-80.
10. Yang W, Burkhardt B, Fischer L, Beirow M, Bork N, Wönne EC, et al. Age-dependent changes of the antioxidant system in rat livers are accompanied by altered MAPK activation and a decline in motor signaling. EXCLI J 2015; 14: 1273-90.
11. Nogales F, Rua RM, Ojeda ML, Murillo ML, Carreras O. Oral or intraperitoneal binge drinking and oxidative balance in adolescent rats. Chem Res Toxicol 2014; 27(11): 1926-33.
12. Das SK, Vasudevan DM. Effect of ethanol on liver antioxidant defense systems: a dose dependent study. Indian J Clin Biochem 2005; 20: 80-4.
13. Guemouri L, Artur Y, Herbeth B, Jeandel C, Cuny G, Siest G. Biological variability of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in blood. Clin Chem 1991; 37: 1932-37.
14. Kołota A, Głąbska D, Oczkowski M, Gromadzka-Ostrowska J. Influence of alcohol consumption on body mass gain and liver antioxidant defense in adolescent growing male rats. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019; 16(13). pii: E2320.
15. Radic I, Mijovic M, Tatalovic N, Mitic M, Lukic V, Joksimovic B, et al. Protective effects of whey on rat liver damage induced by chronic alcohol intake. Hum Exp Toxicol 2019; 38: 632-45.
16. Scott RB, Reddy KS, Husain K, Schlorff EC, Rybak LP, Somani SM. Dose response of ethanol on antioxidant defense system of liver, lung, and kidney in rat. Pathophysiology 2000; 7: 25-32.
17. Bindu MP, Annamalai PT. Combined effect of alcohol and cigarette smoke on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in rats. Indian J Biochem Biophys 2004; 41: 40-4.
18. Ozaras R, Tahan V, Aydin S, Uzun H, Kaya S, Santurk H. N-acetylcysteine attenuates alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat. World J Gastroenterol 2003; 9: 125-8.
19. Cheng D, Kong H. The effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on alcohol-induced oxidative stress in rats. Molecules 2011; 16: 2542-50.
20. Kasdallah-Grissa A, Mornagui B, Aouani E, Hammami M, May M, Gharbi N, et al. Resveratrol, a red wine polyphenol, attenuates ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Life Sci 2007; 80: 1033-39.
21. Xu L, Yu Y, Sang R, Li J, Ge B, Zhang X. Protective effects of Taraxasterol against ethanol-induced liver injury by regulating CYP2E1/Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways in mice. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2018; 2018: 8284107.
22. Liu X, Hou R, Yan J, Xu K, Wu X, Lin W, et al. Purification and characterization of Inonotus hispidus exopolysaccharide and its protective effect on acute alcoholic liver injury in mice. Int J Biol Macromol 2019; 129: 41-9.
23. Velvizhi S, Nagalashmi I, Essa MM, Dakshayani KB, Subramanian P. Effects of α-ketoglutarate on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status during chronic ethanol administration in Wistar rats. Pol J Pharmacol 2002; 54: 231-6.
24. Devipriya N, Srinivasan M, Sudheer AR, Menon VP. Effect of ellagic acid, a natural polyphenol, on alcohol-induced prooxidant and antioxidant imbalance: a drug dose dependent study. Singapore Med J 2007; 48: 311-8.
25. Pushpakiran G, Mahalakshmi K, Anuradha CV. Taurine restores ethanol-induced depletion of antioxidants and attenuates oxidative stress in rat tissues. Amino Acids 2004; 27: 91-6.
26. Yao P, Li K, Jin Y, Song F, Zhou S, Sun X, et al. Oxidative damage after chronic ethanol intake in rat tissues: Prophylaxis of Ginkgo biloba extract. Food Chem 2006; 99: 305-14.
27. Kasdallah-Grissa A, Nakbi A, Koubaa N, El-Fazaâ S, Gharbi N, Kamoun A, et al. Dietary virgin olive oil protects against lipid peroxidation and improves antioxidant status in the liver of rats chronically exposed to ethanol. Nutr Res 2008; 28: 472-9.
28. Dahiru D, Obidoa O. Evaluation of the antioxidant effects of Ziziphus mauritiana lam. leaf extracts against chronic ethanol-induced hepatotoxicty in rat liver. Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med 2008; 5: 39-45.
29. Hwang HJ, Kim IH, Nam TJ. Protective effect of polysaccharide from Hizikia fusiformis against ethanol-induced toxicity. Adv Food Nutr Res 2011; 64: 143-61.
30. Ning JW, Lin GB, Ji F, Xu J, Sharify N. Preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on rat ethanol-induced gastritis. World J Gastroenterol 2012; 18: 2262-9.
31. Gomi A, Harima-Mizusawa N, Shibahara-Sone H, Kano M, Miyazaki K, Ishikawa F. Effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum BF-1 on gastric protection and mucin production in an acute gastric injury rat model. J Dairy Sci 2013; 96: 832-7.
32. de Carvalho TG, Garcia VB, de Araújo AA, da Silva Gasparotto LH, Silva H, Guerra GCB, et al. Spherical neutral gold nanoparticles improve anti-inflammatory response, oxidative stress and fibrosis in alcohol-methamphetamine-induced liver injury in rats. Int J Pharm 2018; 548: 1-14.
33. Nagababu E, Chrest FJ, Rifkind JM. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced heme degradation in red blood cells: the protective roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Biochim Biophys Acta 2003; 16201: 211-7.
34. Yang L, Wu D, Wang X, Cederbaum AI. Cytochrome P4502E1, oxidative stress, JNK, and autophagy in acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Free Radical Biol Med 2012; 53: 1170-80.
35. Misra UK, Bradford BU, Handler JA, Thurman RG. Chronic ethanol treatment induces H2O2 production selectively in pericentral regions of the liver lobule. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1992; 16: 839-42.
36. Oh SI, Kim CI, Chun HJ, Park SC. Chronic ethanol consumption affects glutathione status in rat liver. J Nutr 1998; 128: 758-63. 37. Tahir M, Sultana S. Chrysin modulates ethanol metabolism in Wistar rats: a promising role against organ toxicities. Alcohol Alcohol 2011; 46: 383-92.
38. Popovic M, Janicijevic-Hudomal S, Kaurinovic B, Rasic J, Trivic S. Antioxidant effects of some drugs on ethanol-induced ulcers. Molecules 2009; 14: 816-26.
39. Marnett LJ, Riggins JN, West JD. Endogenous generation of reactive oxidants and electrophiles and their reactions with DNA and protein. J Clin Invest 2003; 111: 583-93.
40. Dröge W. Free radicals in the physiological control of cell function. Physiol Rev 2002; 82: 47-95.
41. Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E, Piemonte F. Analysis of glutathione: implication in redox and detoxification. Clin Chim Acta 2003; 333: 19-39.
42. Jones DP, Mody VCJr, Carlson JL, Lynn MJ, Sternberg P Jr. Redox analysis of human plasma allows separation of pro-oxidant events of aging from decline in antioxidant defenses. Free Radic Biol Med 2002; 33: 1290-300.
43. Cederbaum AI. Hepatoprotective effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine against alcohol- and cytochrome P450 2E1-induced liver injury. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16: 1366-76.
44. Das SK, Vasudevan DM. Alcohol-induced oxidative stress. Life Sci 2007; 81: 177-87.
45. Deleve SM, Kaplowitz N. Importance and regulation of hepatic glutathione. Semin Liver Dis 1990; 10: 251-6.
46. Chopra A, Pereira G, Gomes T, Pereira J, Prabhu P, Krishnan S, et al. A study of chromium and ethanol toxicity in female Wistar rats. Toxicol Environ Chemi 1996; 53: 91-106.
47. Acharya S, Mehta K, Krishnan S, Rao CV. A subtoxic interactive toxicity study of ethanol and chromium in male Wistar rats. Alcohol 2001; 23: 99-108.
48. Shukla SD, Restrepo RJ, Aroor AR, Liu X, Lim RW, Franke JD, et al. Binge alcohol is more injurious to liver in female than male rats: histopathological, pharmacological, and epigenetic profiles. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2019; pii: jpet.119.258871.
49. Song Z, Zhou Z, Chen T, Hill D, Kang J, Barve S, et al. S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) protects against acute alcohol induced hepatotoxicity in mice small star, filled. J Nutr Biochem 2003; 14: 591-7.
50. Zhou Z, Wang L, Song Z, Lambert JC, McClain CJ, Kang YJ. A critical involvement of oxidative stress in acute alcohol-induced hepatic TNF-α production. Am J Pathol 2003; 16: 1137-46.
51. Song Z, Deaciuc I, Song M, Lee DY, Liu Y, Ji X, et al. Silymarin protects against acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2006; 30: 407-13.
52. Zamani E, Mohammadbagheri M, Fallah M, Shaki F. Atorvastatin attenuates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Res Pharm Sci 2017; 12: 315-21.
53. Wu D, Cederbaum A. Alcohol, oxidative stress, and free radical damage. Alcohol Res Health 2003; 27: 277-84.
54. Łuczaj W, Zapora E, Skrzydlewska W. Influence of green tea on erythrocytes antioxidant status of different age rats intoxicated with ethanol. Phytoter Res 2010; 24: 424-8.
55. Calabrese V, Spadaro F, Dinotta F, Ravagna A, Randazzo F, Randazzo G, et al. Long-term ethanol administration enhances urinary ultraweak luminescence and age-dependent modulation of redox in central and peripheral organs of the rat. Int J Tissue React 1998; 20: 57-62.
56. Calabrese V, Renis M, Calderone A, Russo A, Barcellona ML, Rizza V. Stress proteins and SH-groups in oxidant-induced cell damage after acute ethanol administration in rat. Free Radic Biol Med 1996; 20: 391-8.
57. Zhou Z, Sun X, Kang Y. Metallothionein protection against alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of oxidative stress. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2002; 227: 214-22.
58. Rhee SG, Yang KS, Kang SW, Woo HA, Chang TS. Controlled elimination of intracellular H(2)O(2): regulation of peroxiredoxin, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase via post-translational modification. Antioxid Redox Signal 2005; 7: 619-26.
59. Carpena X, Wiseman B, Deemagarn T, Singh R, Switala J, Ivancich A, et al. A molecular switch and electronic circuit modulate catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases. EMBO Rep 2005; 6: 1156-62.
60. Kulkarni SR, Ravindra KP, Dhume CY, Rataboli P, Rodrigues E. Levels of plasma testosterone, antioxidants and oxidative stress in alcoholic patients attending de-addiction centre. Biol Med 2009; 1: 11-20.
61. Oh SI, Kim CI, Chun HJ, Lee MS, Park SC. Glutathione recycling is attenuated by acute ethanol feeding in rat. J Korean Med Sci 1997; 12: 316-21.
62. Zima T, Fialova L, Mestek O, Janebova M, Crkovska J, Malbohan I, et al. Oxidative stress, metabolism of ethanol and alcohol-related diseases. J Biomed Sci 2001; 8: 59-70.
63. Dringen A. Metabolism and functions of glutathione in brain. Progr Neurobiol 2000; 62: 649-71.
64. Martin M, Macias M, Escames G, Leon J, Acuna-Castroviejo D. Melatonin but not vitamin C and E maintains glutathione homeostasis in t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress. FASEB J 2000; 14: 1677-9.
65. Ojeda L, Nogales F, Vázquez B, Delgado J, Murillo M, Carreras O. Pharmacology and cell metabolism. Alcohol, gestation and breastfeeding: Selenium as an antioxidant therapy. Alcohol Alcohol 2009; 44: 272-7.
66. Augustyniak A, Waszkiewicz E, Skrzydlewska E. Preventive action of green tea from changes on the liver antioxidant abilities of different aged rats intoxicated with ethanol. Nutrition 2005; 21: 925-32.
67. Pollak N, Dolle C, Ziegler M. The power to reduce: pyridine nucleotidesdsmall molecules with a multitude of functions. Biochem J 2007; 402: 205-18.
68. Ghosh Dastidar S, Warner JB, Warner DR, McClain CJ, Kirpich IA. Rodent models of alcoholic liver disease: role of binge ethanol administration. Biomolecules 2018; 8(1): 3. DOI: 10.3390/biom8010003.
69. Juskeviciute E, Dippold RP, Antony AN, Swarup A, Vadigepalli R, Hoek JB. Inhibition of miR-21 rescues liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in ethanol-fed rats. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2016; 311: G794-G806.
70. Pibiri M. Liver regeneration in aged mice: new insights. Aging (Albany NY) 2018; 10: 1801-24.
71. Kander MC, Cui Y, Liu Z. Gender difference in oxidative stress: a new look at the mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases. J Cell Mol Med 2017; 21: 1024-32.

Wprowadzenie

Wątroba jest narządem pełniącym wiele funkcji, wśród których ważne miejsce zajmuje neutralizacja szkodliwych związków, m.in. alkoholu etylowego oraz produktów jego metabolizmu. W trakcie tych przemian wytwarzane są wolne rodniki, przy czym w prawidłowych warunkach istnieje równowaga między ich produkcją a eliminacją przez substancje o działaniu przeciwutleniającym, neutralizujące wolne rodniki i utrzymujące w ten sposób równowagę oksydacyjno-antyoksydacyjną w wątrobie [1]. Zachwianie tej równowagi jest definiowane jako stres oksydacyjny, który może powstawać w następstwie działania wielu czynników, m.in. nieodpowiedniej diety, spożywania napojów alkoholowych, używania narkotyków czy narażenia na zanieczyszczenia środowiska, np. na metale ciężkie. Nadmierne ilości wolnych rodników upośledzają mechanizmy obrony antyoksydacyjnej, obniżając ich wydajność, co powoduje uszkodzenia komórek, głównie hepatocytów, w których wolne rodniki powstają [2]. Stres oksydacyjny odgrywa istotną rolę w procesach starzenia się organizmu i patogenezie wielu schorzeń, w tym chorób układu krążenia, przewlekłej chorobie nerek, chorób neurodegeneracyjnych [3], jak również alkoholowej chorobie wątroby czy niealkoholowym stłuszczeniowym zapaleniu wątroby [4]. W celu ochrony komórek przed wolnymi rodnikami w organizmie zostały wytworzone systemy obejmujące działanie dwóch rodzajów antyoksydantów: enzymów antyoksydacyjnych (m.in. katalazy, dysmutazy ponadtlenkowej, peroksydazy glutationowej) oraz substancji niskocząsteczkowych (α-tokoferolu, β-karotenu, witaminy C, glutationu, flawonoidów). Działanie antyoksydantów polega na zapobieganiu powstawania wolnych rodników, ich inaktywacji, ale także naprawie uszkodzonych przez nie komórek [5]. Dzięki tym właściwościom substancje antyoksydacyjne znalazły także zastosowanie w leczeniu schorzeń wątroby, przy czym w ostatnich latach głównym kierunkiem badań jest określenie terapeutycznego efektu występujących w roślinach substancji o działaniu antyoksydacyjnym [4]. Biorąc pod uwagę, że spożycie alkoholu w wielu krajach wzrasta [6], poznanie mechanizmów wpływu etanolu na obronę antyoksydacyjną w wątrobie może pomóc w planowaniu terapii osób z uszkodzeniami tego narządu spowodowanymi przez nadmierne spożywanie alkoholu.

Celem pracy jest scharakteryzowanie, na podstawie dostępnych danych literaturowych, wpływu spożywania alkoholu etylowego na wybrane parametry obrony antyoksydacyjnej w wątrobie w badaniach modelowych oraz wyjaśnienie mechanizmów enzymatycznej i nieenzymatycznej obrony antyoksydacyjnej w wątrobie.

Przegląd literatury

Wpływ alkoholu etylowego na aktywność dysmutazy ponadtlenkowej
Głównym enzymem o działaniu przeciwutleniającym jest dysmutaza ponadtlenkowa (SOD), katalizująca reakcję dysmutacji wysoce toksycznego związku – anionorodnika ponadtlenkowego – do tlenu i nadtlenku wodoru, dzięki czemu obniża ona poziom związku, którego nadmierne ilości powodują uszkodzenia komórki [7]. W centrum aktywnym SOD mogą występować metale: miedź w połączeniu z cynkiem, żelazo, mangan i nikiel. Stanowi to podstawę do wyodrębnienia czterech grup tzw. metaloenzymów SOD [8]. Wraz z wiekiem zmniejszają się naturalne zasoby SOD w organizmie [9]. Co ciekawe, choć poziom białka SOD w wątrobie starszych szczurów był znacząco niższy niż u młodych, to, jak wynika z obserwacji, aktywność enzymu nie różniła się istotnie między grupami [10]. Zastosowanie u dorastających szczurów modelu nadmiernego picia, przez dootrzewnowe podawanie 20% roztworu etanolu, spowodowało znaczący wzrost aktywności SOD w wątrobie, co według autorów świadczy o nasileniu stresu oksydacyjnego, prawdopodobnie w wyniku wydzielania po iniekcji kortyzolu (hormonu stresu) [11]. Wzrost aktywności SOD w wątrobie odnotowali również Das i Vasudevan [12], którzy podawali szczurom etanol w dawkach od 1,2 do 2 g/kg masy ciała. Zwiększenie aktywności tego enzymu może wskazywać na efekt prooksydacyjnego działania etanolu, czyli zwiększoną produkcję wolnych rodników w wyniku jego metabolizmu [13].

W innym doświadczeniu młode szczury w sposób dobrowolny spożywały 10% roztwór alkoholu etylowego przez 2, 4 lub 6 tygodni, co nie wpłynęło na aktywność SOD w wątrobie [14]. Podobne zjawisko miało miejsce u dorosłych szczurów otrzymujących 12% roztwór etanolu przez 6 tygodni [15]. Można podejrzewać, że stężenie etanolu było zbyt niskie, aby wywołać zmiany w aktywności SOD. W innych doświadczeniach prowadzonych z wykorzystaniem zwierząt laboratoryjnych odnotowano, w porównaniu z grupami kontrolnymi, obniżenie aktywności SOD w wątrobie – zarówno w wyniku krótkiej, jednogodzinnej ekspozycji na różne dawki etanolu (2, 4 do 6 g/kg masy ciała) [16], jak i dłuższej ekspozycji na alkohol etylowy, a mianowicie podawanie go przez miesiąc w dawce 4 g/kg masy ciała (18% roztwór) [17], 6 g/kg masy ciała/dobę [18] lub 7 g/kg masy ciała/dobę [19]. Zmniejszona aktywność SOD może wpływać na obniżenie skuteczności komórek w detoksykacji wolnych rodników, prowadząc w ten sposób do zwiększonego poziomu produktów peroksydacji lipidów. Potwierdzają to wyniki licznych prac [18–22].

Zmniejszenie aktywności SOD obserwowano także w doświadczeniach, w których stosowano roztwory o wyższym stężeniu etanolu: 20% [23, 24], 30% [25, 26], 35% [27], a także 40% [28] i 50% [22]. Według Scott i wsp. [16] przyczyną obniżenia aktywności SOD może być inaktywacja tego enzymu przez wolne rodniki wytwarzane w wątrobie w trakcie przemian metabolicznych etanolu, a obserwowane zmiany są odzwierciedleniem niewystarczającej zdolności wątroby do usuwania wolnych rodników, co prowadzi do powstania stresu oksydacyjnego.

Warto również podkreślić, że sposób podawania szczurom etanolu był odmienny, wysokie stężenia etanolu podawano bowiem najczęściej dożołądkowo. Powodowało to powstawanie stanów zapalnych i nadżerek w ścianie tego narządu [29–31] i niewątpliwie zmieniało także profil obrony antyoksydacyjnej, co – jak już wcześniej wspomniano – mogło mieć związek z wydzielaniem kortyzolu. Ponadto w celu wywołania alkoholowego uszkodzenia wątroby szczurom podawano 30% roztwór alkoholowy (7 g/kg masy ciała) raz dziennie przez 28 dni [32]. Stosowanie takiej procedury będzie prowadziło zatem nie tylko do zmian morfologicznych narządu, lecz także do zmian aktywności lub poziomu markerów obrony antyoksydacyjnej w wątrobie.

Wpływ alkoholu etylowego na aktywność katalazy

Katalaza jest enzymem współdziałającym z SOD, gdyż rozkłada nadtlenek wodoru do cząsteczki tlenu i wody, a oprócz tego wykazuje też aktywność peroksydazową w reakcjach utlenienia takich związków organicznych, jak etanol, metanol czy mrówczan, którym to reakcjom towarzyszy redukcja nadtlenku wodoru do wody [33]. Jednorazowe narażenie na wzrastające dawki etanolu (2, 4 lub 6 g/kg masy ciała) nie spowodowało różnic w aktywności tego enzymu w wątrobie [16], co również można tłumaczyć zbyt małą ilością etanolu, którego metabolizm nie spowodował nadmiernej produkcji nadtlenku wodoru, będącego głównym aktywatorem peroksydazowej aktywności katalazy [16]. Doświadczenia innych autorów wskazują, że ostre zatrucia etanolem powodują znaczący wzrost aktywności katalazy w wątrobie zarówno młodych szczurów [11], jak i dorosłych myszy [34], przyczyniając się do nasilonego utleniania lipidów i białek w wątrobie. Długotrwałe spożywanie alkoholu wzmaga aktywność tego enzymu w wątrobie [35], co potwierdzają wyniki doświadczeń zespołu Radic i wsp. [15] (szczury otrzymywały 12% roztwór etanolu), a także Oh i wsp. [36] (alkohol etylowy stanowił 36% wartości energetycznej diety szczurów). Wysokie stężenie alkoholu prowadzi do wzrostu zredukowanej formy dinukleotydu nikotynamidoadeninowego w wyniku konwersji etanolu do aldehydu octowego, ponadto w toku przemian etanolu powstaje, wspomniany wcześniej, nadtlenek wodoru. Nadmierne ilości obu tych związków mogą zwiększyć aktywność peroksydazową katalazy, co prowadzi do zmniejszenia stężenia substratu dla tego enzymu. Tłumaczyłoby to obserwowany w powyższych badaniach wzrost aktywności katalazy na skutek spożywania alkoholu etylowego.

Z kolei wyniki innych prac wskazują na obniżenie aktywności katalazy w efekcie dłuższego narażenia na alkohol etylowy, a mianowicie ekspozycji przez 4 tygodnie na dawki alkoholu etylowego 5, 8, 10 oraz 12 g/kg masy ciała [37], na 18% roztwór alkoholu etylowego w dawce 4 g/kg masy ciała [17] i 20% roztwór w dawce 7,9 g/kg masy ciała [24] czy 30% roztwór [25]. Podobne efekty obserwowano przy wydłużeniu narażenia na 30% roztwór etanolu do 3 miesięcy [26] i przy zastosowaniu bardziej stężonego, bo 35% [20, 27], 40% [28] czy 50% roztworu etanolu [22]. Również podawanie szczurom etanolu (7 g/kg masy ciała) sondą do żołądka wpłynęło na istotne zmniejszenie aktywności katalazy [19], przy czym była to sytuacja, w której zwierzęta poddano działaniu silnych stresorów, co zapewne zmieniło odpowiedź organizmu manifestującą się m.in. obniżeniem aktywności katalazy. Bindu i Annamalai [17] tłumaczą obniżoną aktywność katalazy jako efekt szkodliwego działania wolnych rodników produkowanych w toku przemian etanolu lub bezpośredniego wpływu aldehydu octowego powstałego w wyniku utleniania alkoholu etylowego. Z kolei Popovic i wsp. [38] uważają, że obniżenie aktywności katalazy w wyniku ekspozycji na alkohol etylowy prowadzi do kumulacji reaktywnych form tlenu, co może przyczyniać się do intensyfikacji procesów utleniania lipidów, a także uszkodzenia tkanek. Na podstawie przytoczonych powyżej badań trudno w sposób jednoznaczny określić, czy alkohol etylowy ma wpływ na aktywność katalazy, aczkolwiek większość doniesień wskazuje, że aktywność tego enzymu u zwierząt spożywających alkohol jest niższa niż u zwierząt, które nie były narażone na jego działanie.

Wpływ alkoholu etylowego na poziom glutationu

Glutation jest kofaktorem dla enzymów antyoksydacyjnych: peroksydazy glutationowej, reduktazy glutationowej oraz transferazy glutationowej, a także uczestniczy w eliminacji wolnych rodników i regeneracji innych antyoksydantów (witaminy C i E), jak również w naprawianiu uszkodzonych elementów komórek (białek, lipidów błon komórkowych, DNA) [5, 39]. Synteza glutationu odbywa się we wszystkich komórkach, jednak najwyższe jego stężenie wykazano w wątrobie, z której jest on uwalniany do krwi i żółci. Występuje w formie zredukowanej lub utlenionej, a stosunek stężeń obu tych form stanowi wskaźnik równowagi oksydoredukcyjnej środowiska komórkowego [40]. Zredukowana forma glutationu dominuje w komórce, jednakże grupa tiolowa łatwo ulega procesom oksydacji z udziałem peroksydazy glutationowej katalizującej redukcję nadtlenku wodoru lub nadtlenków organicznych. W tej reakcji powstaje szkodliwy dla komórek disulfid glutationu, który może tworzyć disiarczki z białkami zawierającymi grupy tiolowe i je utleniać; w celu jego eliminacji jest redukowany w obecności fosforanu dinukleotydu nikotynamidoadeninowego i reduktazy glutationowej [33, 41]. Podstawową funkcją glutationu jest utrzymywanie grup tiolowych wielu białek w stanie zredukowanym, zapewniającym im w ten sposób aktywność funkcjonalną [42].

Badania nad hepatotoksycznością alkoholu etylowego wykazały, że stan długotrwałej intoksykacji alkoholowej powoduje obniżenie stężenia glutationu w mitochondriach. Transport etanolu z cytoplazmy ulega wówczas ograniczeniu, co obniża zdolność komórek do redukcji glutationu. To z kolei przyczynia się do nagromadzenia w cytozolu jego formy utlenionej, która jest usuwana z komórki lub reaguje z grupami tiolowymi białek, powodując obniżenie wewnątrzkomórkowego stężenia glutationu. W ten sposób dochodzi do oksydacyjnych uszkodzeń hepatocytów i całego narządu [43].

Spożywanie alkoholu uszczupla zasoby glutationu i przyczynia się do zmniejszenia zdolności antyoksydacyjnych organizmu [44], przy czym obniżenie zasobów glutationu wynoszące ponad 20% osłabia komórkowe mechanizmy obronne przed wolnymi rodnikami i powoduje uszkodzenia hepatocytów [45]. Określenie stopnia zubożenia zasobów glutationu w wątrobie może być zatem wskaźnikiem uszkodzenia tego narządu przez spożywanie alkoholu.

W doświadczeniach przeprowadzonych na młodych samicach szczurów, otrzymujących przez dłuższy okres 10% roztwór alkoholu etylowego, odnotowano znacznie niższy, w stosunku do samic z grupy kontrolnej, poziom glutationu całkowitego w wątrobie [46, 47], choć należy zaznaczyć, że podatność na uszkodzenia wątroby jest znacznie większa u samic niż u samców [48]. Inni autorzy [49–52] wskazują na obniżenie stężenia glutationu w efekcie spożywania jednorazowej dawki wzrastających stężeń etanolu [16], a także w efekcie długotrwałej ekspozycji na działanie różnych stężeń alkoholu etylowego: 18% [17], 20% [24], 30% [25, 26] oraz 35% [20, 27]. Przyczyną obserwowanych zmian może być wiązanie aldehydu octowego przez glutation, co prowadzi do obniżenia poziomu tego ostatniego. Ponadto odnotowana u szczurów spożywających etanol wyższa aktywność S-transferazy glutationowej (GST) i peroksydazy glutationowej (GPx) wskazywałaby na wzrost wykorzystania glutationu przez te enzymy [17]. Obniżenie stężenia glutationu prowadzi do akumulacji nadtlenku wodoru i w ten sposób może powodować wzrost aktywności katalazy, która przy wysokim poziomu nadtlenku wodoru przejmuje detoksykacyjne funkcje peroksydazy glutationowej [38, 53]. Z kolei według Łuczaj i wsp. [54] zwiększenie poziomu nadtlenku wodoru i nadtlenków lipidów przyczynia się nie tylko do obniżenia stężenia glutationu, lecz także do zmniejszenia aktywności peroksydazy glutationowej.

Warto nadmienić, że uszczuplenie wewnątrzkomórkowych zasobów glutationu może dotyczyć nie tylko wątroby, ale również innych narządów, np. mózgu [55]. W opinii niektórych badaczy ekspozycja na duże dawki etanolu powoduje zmiany w endogennej puli tioli, co ma związek z indukcją białek stresowych w różnych obszarach wątroby oraz mózgu [56]. Według Zhou i wsp. [57] odtworzenie zasobów glutationu, dzięki zwiększaniu zdolności antyoksydacyjnych organizmu, hamuje uszkodzenia wątroby spowodowane przez działanie etanolu, co może mieć potencjalne zastosowanie w terapii osób z alkoholową chorobą wątroby.

Wpływ alkoholu etylowego na aktywność enzymów zależnych od glutationu

Peroksydaza glutationowa (GPx), podobnie jak katalaza, redukuje nadtlenek wodoru do cząsteczki tlenu i wody, przy czym, z uwagi na większe powinowactwo do tego związku, odpowiada za katabolizm większości powstającego w komórkach nadtlenku wodoru [58]. Ponadto GPx odgrywa dominującą rolę w detoksykacji nadtlenku wodoru przy jego niskich stężeniach, a gdy jego stężenie wzrasta – funkcję tę przejmuje katalaza [59]. Peroksydaza glutationowa, wspólnie z reduktazą glutationową, utrzymuje w równowadze wewnątrzkomórkowy status oksydoredukcyjny [60].

Jednorazowa dawka różnych stężeń alkoholu etylowego (2, 4 lub 6 g/kg masy ciała) podawanego dożołądkowo szczurom nie spowodowała istotnych różnic w aktywności GPx [16]. Peroksydaza glutationowa odgrywa kluczową rolę w detoksykacji nadtlenku wodoru przy jego niskich stężeniach, dlatego obserwowany brak zmian aktywności może oznaczać, że nadtlenek wodoru powstający w wyniku przemian metabolicznych etanolu był u młodych szczurów skutecznie usuwany. Jednocześnie dootrzewnowe podanie mocnego roztworu etanolu powoduje stan zapalny otrzewnej, a wzrost aktywności GPx jest jedną z jego konsekwencji, co potwierdzają wyniki doświadczenia przeprowadzonego przez Oh i wsp. [61]. Również podawanie szczurom przez dłuższy czas alkoholu etylowego prowadzi do znacznego wzrostu aktywności GPx w wątrobie [17], co może być mechanizmem obronnym organizmu przed nadmiarem wolnych rodników. Inni badacze, oceniający wpływ długotrwałego podawania alkoholu etylowego na aktywność enzymów antyoksydacyjnych, obserwowali u zwierząt stanowiących grupę kontrolną istotnie niższą aktywność GPx w wątrobie niezależnie od stężenia i sposobu podawania (per os, zgłębnik doustny, dożołądkowo, dootrzewnowo) zwierzętom roztworu etanolu [18–20, 25–28, 37]. Obniżenie aktywności tego enzymu w wyniku długotrwałej ekspozycji na alkohol może być związane z jego wyczerpaniem lub inaktywacją przez reaktywne formy tlenu, których nadmierne ilości powstają w toku przemian etanolu [62]. Należy także podkreślić, że mechanizm odpowiedzi organizmu bywa inny, gdy roztwór etanolu, dodatkowo o wysokim stężeniu, jest aplikowany bezpośrednio do żołądka (co może uszkodzić jego błonę śluzową i prowadzić do powstania stanu zapalnego), a inny – gdy stosuje się model spożywania niewielkich stężeń alkoholu etylowego.

Reduktaza glutationowa (GR) występuje w cytoplazmie i mitochondriach, a jej główną funkcją jest utrzymywanie wewnątrz komórek prawidłowego stężenia zredukowanego glutationu poprzez przekształcanie formy utlenionej glutationu do jego zredukowanej pochodnej, z jednoczesnym utlenieniem fosforanu dinukleotydu nikotynamidoadeninowego. Enzym ten, wspólnie z GPx, której aktywność jest zależna od stosunku formy zredukowanej do utlenionej glutationu, utrzymuje w równowadze wewnątrzkomórkowy status oksydoredukcyjny [60]. W toku reakcji katalizowanych przez oba te enzymy poziom glutationu całkowitego nie ulega zmianie [63]. Natomiast obniżenie poziomu formy zredukowanej glutationu prowadzi do nagromadzenia znacznych ilości nadtlenku wodoru, co może powodować uszkodzenia komórki, a nadmiar utlenionej postaci glutationu może zahamować aktywność enzymów [64].

W dostępnej literaturze wyniki badań dotyczących wpływu alkoholu etylowego na aktywność GR są sprzeczne. Z jednej strony nie zaobserwowano zmian w aktywności GR w wątrobie szczurów po jednorazowym podaniu roztworu alkoholu etylowego [16], z drugiej – odnotowywano, w porównaniu z grupą kontrolną, istotne zmniejszenie jej aktywności po jednorazowym podaniu szczurom etanolu o stężeniu 30% [61]. Prawdopodobnie obniżenie aktywności wynikało z działania silnego czynnika stresowego, którym w tym przypadku było wysokie stężenie roztworu alkoholu etylowego. Z kolei wyższą aktywność GR stwierdzono podczas długotrwałego podawania szczurom coraz większych stężeń alkoholu etylowego (5, 8, 10 oraz 12 g/kg masy ciała) [28] czy 40% roztworu etanolu [37]. Wzrost aktywności GR intensyfikuje procesy ponownego wykorzystania glutationu, dzięki czemu detoksykacja ksenobiotyków jest bardziej skuteczna [36]. W doświadczeniu Ojeda i wsp. [65] przeprowadzonym na młodych szczurach, które były narażone na działanie 20% roztworu etanolu w okresie płodowym i w okresie laktacji, zaobserwowano wyższą niż w grupie kontrolnej aktywność GR. Według autorów może to świadczyć o adaptacji komórek do stresu oksydacyjnego w kierunku utrzymania prawidłowego stężenia glutationu lub też zmniejszenia ilości zredukowanej formy fosforanu dinukleotydu nikotynamidoadeninowego, którego poziom wzrasta w efekcie narażenia na działanie etanolu. Augustyniak i wsp. [66] wykazali znacznie wyższy poziom glutationu na skutek pięciotygodniowego okresu spożywania przez szczury diety zawierającej etanol (stanowiący 36% wartości energetycznej diety). Ponadto zaobserwowali istotnie wyższą aktywność GR u szczurów spożywających przez 5 tygodni dietę z dodatkiem etanolu w porównaniu z grupą kontrolną. W tym przypadku zwiększenie aktywności GR i poziomu glutationu w wątrobie bywa również przejawem przystosowania komórek do stresu oksydacyjnego. Dodatkowo następstwem nadmiernego spożywania alkoholu etylowego są niedobory niacyny, które potęgują toksyczne działanie reaktywnych form tlenu. Deficyt niacyny w organizmie może również prowadzić do zmniejszenia poziomu zredukowanej formy fosforanu dinukleotydu nikotynamidoadeninowego, a to z kolei przyczynia się do obniżenia aktywności GR i poziomu glutationu [67].

Wnioski

Alkohol etylowy jest jednym z czynników indukujących wytwarzanie wolnych rodników, a narządem szczególnie narażonym na ich działanie jest wątroba, w której zachodzą przemiany etanolu. Wpływ alkoholu etylowego na parametry obrony antyoksydacyjnej jest zagadnieniem złożonym, nie istnieje bowiem jeden schemat zmian, jakie powinny nastąpić na skutek jego spożywania. W niniejszej pracy podjęto próbę analizy zmian w parametrach obrony antyoksydacyjnej na podstawie dostępnej literatury. Niewiele jest doświadczeń, w których analizowany byłby wpływ jedynie alkoholu etylowego, najczęściej są to prace dotyczące szerszego zagadnienia, np. działania innych substancji szkodliwych, takich jak dym tytoniowy w połączeniu z ekspozycją na alkohol etylowy [17], czy substancji o potencjalnym działaniu chroniącym przed skutkami narażenia na etanol lub niwelującym jego szkodliwy wpływ [15, 28, 32]. Podsumowując, spożywanie alkoholu etylowego przez dłuższy czas przyczyniało się do obniżenia aktywności dysmutazy ponadtlenkowej (SOD) oraz zasobów glutationu, wzrostu aktywności reduktazy glutationowej (GR), natomiast w przypadku katalazy i peroksydazy glutationowej (GPx) notowano zarówno wzrost, jak i obniżenie aktywności tych enzymów. Możliwe, że wpływ na to miały odmienne warunki prowadzenia doświadczeń, różne dawki i stężenia podawanego roztworu etanolu, czas narażenia, wiek i płeć zwierząt oraz sposób podawania etanolu. Utrudnia to interpretację uzyskanych wyników. Warto zwrócić uwagę, że wpływ na odnotowane zależności mogą mieć również zastosowane modele zwierzęce odzwierciedlające sytuacje nadmiernego picia, uzależnienia od alkoholu czy etapy rozwoju alkoholowej choroby wątroby [68]. Poza tym przewlekłe spożywanie alkoholu etylowego blokuje procesy regeneracji w wątrobie, co jest jeszcze zagadnieniem słabo poznanym [69]. Wiadomo natomiast, że wraz z wiekiem zmniejsza się zdolność regeneracji wątroby [70]. Podobnie może być ze skutecznością mechanizmów obrony antyoksydacyjnej, jak bowiem wykazali Yang i wsp. [10] zmiany w aktywności katalazy i SOD w wątrobie są zależne od wieku. Ponadto choć w dostępnej literaturze dominują eksperymenty prowadzone z wykorzystaniem samców szczurów lub myszy, to warto podkreślić, że z jednej strony samice są bardziej podatne na uszkodzenia spowodowane przez spożywanie alkoholu [48], ale z drugiej – mniej podatne na stres oksydacyjny [71].

Wydaje się konieczne prowadzenie dalszych badań nie tylko związanych ze zmianami aktywności/stężenia związków uczestniczących w obronie antyoksydacyjnej, ale również służących pogłębianiu wiedzy dotyczącej właściwości tych związków i możliwości ich terapeutycznego zastosowania. Istnieją bowiem przesłanki do stosowania SOD w takich schorzeniach, jak reumatoidalne zapalenie stawów, mukowiscydoza, choroby neurodegeneracyjne czy cukrzyca [8], nie ma jednak jeszcze danych sugerujących takie możliwości w chorobach wątroby spowodowanych przez nadmierne spożywanie alkoholu.

Konflikt interesów

Nie występuje.

Finansowanie

Nie zadeklarowano.

Etyka

Treści przedstawione w pracy są zgodne z zasadami Deklaracji Helsińskiej odnoszącymi się do badań z udziałem ludzi, dyrektywami UE dotyczącymi ochrony zwierząt używanych do celów naukowych, ujednoliconymi wymaganiami dla czasopism biomedycznych oraz z zasadami etycznymi określonymi w Porozumieniu z Farmington w 1997 roku.

Piśmiennictwo

1. Casas-Grajales S, Muriel P. Antioxidants in liver health. World J Gastrointest Pharmacol Ther 2015; 6: 59-72.
2. Jadeja RN, Devkar RV, Nammi S. Oxidative stress in liver diseases: pathogenesis, prevention, and therapeutics. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2017; 8341286.
3. Liguori I, Russo G, Curcio F, Bulli G, Aran L, Della-Morte D, et al. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clin Interv Aging 2018; 13: 757-72.
4. Li S, Tan HY, Wang N, Zhang ZJ, Lao L, Wong CW, et al. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in liver diseases. Int J Mol Sci 2015; 16: 26087-124.
5. Arauz J, Ramos-Tovar E, Muriel P. Redox state and methods to evaluate oxidative stress in liver damage: From bench to bedside. Ann Hepatol 2016; 15: 160-73.
6. Zima T. Alcohol abuse. EJIFCC 2018; 29(4): 285-89.
7. Wang Y, Branicky R, Noë A, Hekimi S. Superoxide dismutases: Dual roles in controlling ROS damage and regulating ROS signaling. J Cell Biol 2018; 217: 1915-28.
8. Younus H. Therapeutic potentials of superoxide dismutase. Int J Health Sci (Qassim) 2018; 12(3): 88-93. 9. Inal ME, Kanbak G, Sunal E. Antioxidant enzyme activities and malondialdehyde levels related to aging. Clin Chim Acta 2001; 305: 75-80.
10. Yang W, Burkhardt B, Fischer L, Beirow M, Bork N, Wönne EC, et al. Age-dependent changes of the antioxidant system in rat livers are accompanied by altered MAPK activation and a decline in motor signaling. EXCLI J 2015; 14: 1273-90.
11. Nogales F, Rua RM, Ojeda ML, Murillo ML, Carreras O. Oral or intraperitoneal binge drinking and oxidative balance in adolescent rats. Chem Res Toxicol 2014; 27(11): 1926-33.
12. Das SK, Vasudevan DM. Effect of ethanol on liver antioxidant defense systems: a dose dependent study. Indian J Clin Biochem 2005; 20: 80-4.
13. Guemouri L, Artur Y, Herbeth B, Jeandel C, Cuny G, Siest G. Biological variability of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in blood. Clin Chem 1991; 37: 1932-37.
14. Kołota A, Głąbska D, Oczkowski M, Gromadzka-Ostrowska J. Influence of alcohol consumption on body mass gain and liver antioxidant defense in adolescent growing male rats. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019; 16(13). pii: E2320.
15. Radic I, Mijovic M, Tatalovic N, Mitic M, Lukic V, Joksimovic B, et al. Protective effects of whey on rat liver damage induced by chronic alcohol intake. Hum Exp Toxicol 2019; 38: 632-45.
16. Scott RB, Reddy KS, Husain K, Schlorff EC, Rybak LP, Somani SM. Dose response of ethanol on antioxidant defense system of liver, lung, and kidney in rat. Pathophysiology 2000; 7: 25-32.
17. Bindu MP, Annamalai PT. Combined effect of alcohol and cigarette smoke on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in rats. Indian J Biochem Biophys 2004; 41: 40-4.
18. Ozaras R, Tahan V, Aydin S, Uzun H, Kaya S, Santurk H. N-acetylcysteine attenuates alcohol-induced oxidative stress in the rat. World J Gastroenterol 2003; 9: 125-8.
19. Cheng D, Kong H. The effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on alcohol-induced oxidative stress in rats. Molecules 2011; 16: 2542-50.
20. Kasdallah-Grissa A, Mornagui B, Aouani E, Hammami M, May M, Gharbi N, et al. Resveratrol, a red wine polyphenol, attenuates ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Life Sci 2007; 80: 1033-39.
21. Xu L, Yu Y, Sang R, Li J, Ge B, Zhang X. Protective effects of Taraxasterol against ethanol-induced liver injury by regulating CYP2E1/Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways in mice. Oxid Med Cell Longev 2018; 2018: 8284107.
22. Liu X, Hou R, Yan J, Xu K, Wu X, Lin W, et al. Purification and characterization of Inonotus hispidus exopolysaccharide and its protective effect on acute alcoholic liver injury in mice. Int J Biol Macromol 2019; 129: 41-9.
23. Velvizhi S, Nagalashmi I, Essa MM, Dakshayani KB, Subramanian P. Effects of α-ketoglutarate on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status during chronic ethanol administration in Wistar rats. Pol J Pharmacol 2002; 54: 231-6.
24. Devipriya N, Srinivasan M, Sudheer AR, Menon VP. Effect of ellagic acid, a natural polyphenol, on alcohol-induced prooxidant and antioxidant imbalance: a drug dose dependent study. Singapore Med J 2007; 48: 311-8.
25. Pushpakiran G, Mahalakshmi K, Anuradha CV. Taurine restores ethanol-induced depletion of antioxidants and attenuates oxidative stress in rat tissues. Amino Acids 2004; 27: 91-6.
26. Yao P, Li K, Jin Y, Song F, Zhou S, Sun X, et al. Oxidative damage after chronic ethanol intake in rat tissues: Prophylaxis of Ginkgo biloba extract. Food Chem 2006; 99: 305-14.
27. Kasdallah-Grissa A, Nakbi A, Koubaa N, El-Fazaâ S, Gharbi N, Kamoun A, et al. Dietary virgin olive oil protects against lipid peroxidation and improves antioxidant status in the liver of rats chronically exposed to ethanol. Nutr Res 2008; 28: 472-9.
28. Dahiru D, Obidoa O. Evaluation of the antioxidant effects of Ziziphus mauritiana lam. leaf extracts against chronic ethanol-induced hepatotoxicty in rat liver. Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med 2008; 5: 39-45.
29. Hwang HJ, Kim IH, Nam TJ. Protective effect of polysaccharide from Hizikia fusiformis against ethanol-induced toxicity. Adv Food Nutr Res 2011; 64: 143-61.
30. Ning JW, Lin GB, Ji F, Xu J, Sharify N. Preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on rat ethanol-induced gastritis. World J Gastroenterol 2012; 18: 2262-9.
31. Gomi A, Harima-Mizusawa N, Shibahara-Sone H, Kano M, Miyazaki K, Ishikawa F. Effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum BF-1 on gastric protection and mucin production in an acute gastric injury rat model. J Dairy Sci 2013; 96: 832-7.
32. de Carvalho TG, Garcia VB, de Araújo AA, da Silva Gasparotto LH, Silva H, Guerra GCB, et al. Spherical neutral gold nanoparticles improve anti-inflammatory response, oxidative stress and fibrosis in alcohol-methamphetamine-induced liver injury in rats. Int J Pharm 2018; 548: 1-14.
33. Nagababu E, Chrest FJ, Rifkind JM. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced heme degradation in red blood cells: the protective roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Biochim Biophys Acta 2003; 16201: 211-7.
34. Yang L, Wu D, Wang X, Cederbaum AI. Cytochrome P4502E1, oxidative stress, JNK, and autophagy in acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Free Radical Biol Med 2012; 53: 1170-80.
35. Misra UK, Bradford BU, Handler JA, Thurman RG. Chronic ethanol treatment induces H2O2 production selectively in pericentral regions of the liver lobule. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1992; 16: 839-42.
36. Oh SI, Kim CI, Chun HJ, Park SC. Chronic ethanol consumption affects glutathione status in rat liver. J Nutr 1998; 128: 758-63. 37. Tahir M, Sultana S. Chrysin modulates ethanol metabolism in Wistar rats: a promising role against organ toxicities. Alcohol Alcohol 2011; 46: 383-92.
38. Popovic M, Janicijevic-Hudomal S, Kaurinovic B, Rasic J, Trivic S. Antioxidant effects of some drugs on ethanol-induced ulcers. Molecules 2009; 14: 816-26.
39. Marnett LJ, Riggins JN, West JD. Endogenous generation of reactive oxidants and electrophiles and their reactions with DNA and protein. J Clin Invest 2003; 111: 583-93.
40. Dröge W. Free radicals in the physiological control of cell function. Physiol Rev 2002; 82: 47-95.
41. Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E, Piemonte F. Analysis of glutathione: implication in redox and detoxification. Clin Chim Acta 2003; 333: 19-39.
42. Jones DP, Mody VCJr, Carlson JL, Lynn MJ, Sternberg P Jr. Redox analysis of human plasma allows separation of pro-oxidant events of aging from decline in antioxidant defenses. Free Radic Biol Med 2002; 33: 1290-300.
43. Cederbaum AI. Hepatoprotective effects of S-adenosyl-L-methionine against alcohol- and cytochrome P450 2E1-induced liver injury. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16: 1366-76.
44. Das SK, Vasudevan DM. Alcohol-induced oxidative stress. Life Sci 2007; 81: 177-87.
45. Deleve SM, Kaplowitz N. Importance and regulation of hepatic glutathione. Semin Liver Dis 1990; 10: 251-6.
46. Chopra A, Pereira G, Gomes T, Pereira J, Prabhu P, Krishnan S, et al. A study of chromium and ethanol toxicity in female Wistar rats. Toxicol Environ Chemi 1996; 53: 91-106.
47. Acharya S, Mehta K, Krishnan S, Rao CV. A subtoxic interactive toxicity study of ethanol and chromium in male Wistar rats. Alcohol 2001; 23: 99-108.
48. Shukla SD, Restrepo RJ, Aroor AR, Liu X, Lim RW, Franke JD, et al. Binge alcohol is more injurious to liver in female than male rats: histopathological, pharmacological, and epigenetic profiles. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2019; pii: jpet.119.258871.
49. Song Z, Zhou Z, Chen T, Hill D, Kang J, Barve S, et al. S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) protects against acute alcohol induced hepatotoxicity in mice small star, filled. J Nutr Biochem 2003; 14: 591-7.
50. Zhou Z, Wang L, Song Z, Lambert JC, McClain CJ, Kang YJ. A critical involvement of oxidative stress in acute alcohol-induced hepatic TNF-α production. Am J Pathol 2003; 16: 1137-46.
51. Song Z, Deaciuc I, Song M, Lee DY, Liu Y, Ji X, et al. Silymarin protects against acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2006; 30: 407-13.
52. Zamani E, Mohammadbagheri M, Fallah M, Shaki F. Atorvastatin attenuates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Res Pharm Sci 2017; 12: 315-21.
53. Wu D, Cederbaum A. Alcohol, oxidative stress, and free radical damage. Alcohol Res Health 2003; 27: 277-84.
54. Łuczaj W, Zapora E, Skrzydlewska W. Influence of green tea on erythrocytes antioxidant status of different age rats intoxicated with ethanol. Phytoter Res 2010; 24: 424-8.
55. Calabrese V, Spadaro F, Dinotta F, Ravagna A, Randazzo F, Randazzo G, et al. Long-term ethanol administration enhances urinary ultraweak luminescence and age-dependent modulation of redox in central and peripheral organs of the rat. Int J Tissue React 1998; 20: 57-62.
56. Calabrese V, Renis M, Calderone A, Russo A, Barcellona ML, Rizza V. Stress proteins and SH-groups in oxidant-induced cell damage after acute ethanol administration in rat. Free Radic Biol Med 1996; 20: 391-8.
57. Zhou Z, Sun X, Kang Y. Metallothionein protection against alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of oxidative stress. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2002; 227: 214-22.
58. Rhee SG, Yang KS, Kang SW, Woo HA, Chang TS. Controlled elimination of intracellular H(2)O(2): regulation of peroxiredoxin, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase via post-translational modification. Antioxid Redox Signal 2005; 7: 619-26.
59. Carpena X, Wiseman B, Deemagarn T, Singh R, Switala J, Ivancich A, et al. A molecular switch and electronic circuit modulate catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases. EMBO Rep 2005; 6: 1156-62.
60. Kulkarni SR, Ravindra KP, Dhume CY, Rataboli P, Rodrigues E. Levels of plasma testosterone, antioxidants and oxidative stress in alcoholic patients attending de-addiction centre. Biol Med 2009; 1: 11-20.
61. Oh SI, Kim CI, Chun HJ, Lee MS, Park SC. Glutathione recycling is attenuated by acute ethanol feeding in rat. J Korean Med Sci 1997; 12: 316-21.
62. Zima T, Fialova L, Mestek O, Janebova M, Crkovska J, Malbohan I, et al. Oxidative stress, metabolism of ethanol and alcohol-related diseases. J Biomed Sci 2001; 8: 59-70.
63. Dringen A. Metabolism and functions of glutathione in brain. Progr Neurobiol 2000; 62: 649-71.
64. Martin M, Macias M, Escames G, Leon J, Acuna-Castroviejo D. Melatonin but not vitamin C and E maintains glutathione homeostasis in t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress. FASEB J 2000; 14: 1677-9.
65. Ojeda L, Nogales F, Vázquez B, Delgado J, Murillo M, Carreras O. Pharmacology and cell metabolism. Alcohol, gestation and breastfeeding: Selenium as an antioxidant therapy. Alcohol Alcohol 2009; 44: 272-7.
66. Augustyniak A, Waszkiewicz E, Skrzydlewska E. Preventive action of green tea from changes on the liver antioxidant abilities of different aged rats intoxicated with ethanol. Nutrition 2005; 21: 925-32.
67. Pollak N, Dolle C, Ziegler M. The power to reduce: pyridine nucleotidesdsmall molecules with a multitude of functions. Biochem J 2007; 402: 205-18.
68. Ghosh Dastidar S, Warner JB, Warner DR, McClain CJ, Kirpich IA. Rodent models of alcoholic liver disease: role of binge ethanol administration. Biomolecules 2018; 8(1): 3. DOI: 10.3390/biom8010003.
69. Juskeviciute E, Dippold RP, Antony AN, Swarup A, Vadigepalli R, Hoek JB. Inhibition of miR-21 rescues liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in ethanol-fed rats. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2016; 311: G794-G806.
70. Pibiri M. Liver regeneration in aged mice: new insights. Aging (Albany NY) 2018; 10: 1801-24.
71. Kander MC, Cui Y, Liu Z. Gender difference in oxidative stress: a new look at the mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases. J Cell Mol Med 2017; 21: 1024-32.
This is an Open Access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), allowing third parties to download and share its works but not commercially purposes or to create derivative works.
Quick links
© 2020 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe