eISSN: 2081-2833
ISSN: 2081-0016
Medycyna Paliatywna/Palliative Medicine
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
4/2020
vol. 12
 
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abstract:
Original paper

The relationship between depression, anxiety, and pain catastrophising in cancer patients

Fatih İnci
1
,
Habibe İnci
2
,
Oğuzhan Kılınçel
3
,
Süleyman Ersoy
4
,
Fatih Karataş
1
,
Didem Adahan
2

1.
Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, Karabük University, Turkey
2.
Department of Family Medicine, Karabük University, Turkey
3.
Department of Psychiatry, Sakarya Yenikent State Hospital, Turkey
4.
Department of Family Medicine, University of Health Sciences Umraniye SUAM, Turkey
Medycyna Paliatywna 2020; 12(4): 210–215
Online publish date: 2020/12/11
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Introduction
Catastrophising is a person’s view of an unreasonable belief and a worse situation than exaggerating its consequences. It is defined as individuals believing that their current condition and physical discomfort will worsen each time or that something will be worse than it actually is. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression and anxiety and pain catastrophising in cancer patients.

Material and methods
Fifty-five cancer patients who were followed and treated in the Oncology Outpatient Clinic were included in the study. The age, gender, marital status, occupation, and psychiatric history of the participants were recorded. A socio-demographic data form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS) were applied to the participants.

Results
The mean age of the participants was 59.2 ±12.7 years, and 40% were female. When the total BDI and BAI scale scores of cancer patients were evaluated, it was seen that they were not depressed in terms of mean value (p = 0.112), but they were in the anxiety scale (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between depression and anxiety, as well as depression and anxiety and pain catastrophising (p < 0.001, r = 0.782). While the PCS subscales “helplessness” and “rumination” scores were significantly higher in cancer patients with depression and anxiety (p < 0.001), the “magnification” score was significantly higher in cancer patients with anxiety (p < 0.001). The Pain Catastrophising Scale total score increased with increasing BDI and BAI severity (p < 0.001), while the BDI and BAI scores were found to be significantly higher in females than males (p < 0.001).

Conclusions
It was found that cancer patients were generally not depressed but were anxious, and the catastrophising of pain increased with increasing depression and anxiety severity. Health professionals giving care to cancer patients need to be alert to signs of psychological distress in patients experiencing pain.

keywords:

cancer patients, depression, anxiety, pain catastrophising

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