Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
Current Issue Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Archive Ethical standards and procedures Contact Instructions for authors Journal's Reviewers Special Information
SCImago Journal & Country Rank


4/2022
vol. 39
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

A novel multifactorial hamstring screening protocol: association with hamstring muscle injuries in professional football (soccer) – a prospective cohort study

Johan Lahti
1
,
Jurdan Mendiguchia
2
,
Pascal Edouard
3, 4
,
Jean-Benoit Morin
1, 3, 5

1.
Université Cote d’Azur, LAMHESS, Nice, France
2.
Department of Physical Therapy, ZENTRUM Rehab and Performance Center, Barañain, Spain
3.
Inter-university Laboratory of Human Movement Science (LIBM EA 7424), University of Lyon, University Jean Monnet, F-42023. Saint Etienne, France
4.
Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, Sports Medicine Unit, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Faculty of Medicine, Saint-Etienne, France
5.
Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand (SPRINZ), Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
Biol Sport. 2022;39(4):1021–1031
Online publish date: 2021/12/30
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
PlumX metrics:
The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the potential association of a novel multifactorial hamstring screening protocol with the occurrence of hamstring muscle injuries (HMI) in professional football. 161 professional male football players participated in this study (age: 24.6 ± 5.36 years; body-height: 180 ± 7.07 cm; body-mass: 77.2 ± 7.70 kg). During the pre- and mid-season, players performed a screening protocol consisting of 11 tests aimed to evaluate their performance in regards to four main musculoskeletal categories: posterior chain strength, sprint mechanical output, lumbopelvic control and range of motion. Univariable cox regression analysis showed no significant association between the isolated test results and new HMI occurrence during the season (n = 17) (p > 0.05). When including injuries that took place between the pre- and mid-season screenings (~90 days), maximal theoretical horizontal force (F0) was significantly associated with higher HMI risk between pre- and mid-season evaluations (n = 14, hazard ratio; 4.02 (CI95% 1.08 to 15.0, p = 0.04). This study identified that 1) no single screening test was sufficient to identify players at risk of HMI within the entire season, while 2) low F0 was associated with increased risk of HMI when occurring closer to the moment of screening. The present results support the potential relevance of additionally including frequent F0 testing for HMI risk reduction management. Replication studies are needed in larger cohorts for more accurate interpretations on “univariable and multivariable levels levels. Finally, future studies should explore whether improving F0 is relevant within a multifactorial HMI risk reduction approach.
keywords:

soccer, injury prevention, sprinting, risk factors

 
Quick links
© 2022 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.