Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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3/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Application of acute pre-exercise partial-body cryotherapy promotes jump performance, salivary-amylase and athlete readiness

Emily M. Partridge
1
,
Julie Cooke
1, 2
,
Andrew J. McKune
1, 2, 3
,
David B. Pyne
1

1.
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science (UCRISE), University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia
2.
Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia
3.
Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Biol Sport. 2022;39(3):563–569.
Online publish date: 2021/07/15
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This study aimed to evaluate the application of a single pre-exercise bout of partial-body cryotherapy (PBC) to augment jump performance, salivary biomarkers and self-reported performance readiness. Twelve male rugby union players (age 20.7 ± 3.2 yr; body mass 93.1 ± 13.9 kg; mean ± SD) were exposed to PBC for 3 min at –140°C or control condition prior to a pre-post series of loaded countermovement jumps (CMJ), salivary biomarker samples and performance readiness questionnaires. PBC elicited a moderately greater improvement in CMJ velocity of +4.7 ± 3.5% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) from baseline to 15 min in comparison with a -1.9 ± 4.8% mean difference in the control condition. The mean change in concentration of salivary α-amylase at 15 min was substantially increased by +131 ± 109% after PBC exposure, compared to a -4.2 ± 42% decrease in the control. Salivary testosterone concentrations were unclear at all timepoints in both the PBC and control interventions. Self-reported perceptions of overall performance readiness indicated small to moderate increases in mental fatigue, mood, muscle soreness and overall questionnaire score after PBC compared to control with a higher score more favourable for performance. The application of pre-exercise PBC can elicit favourable outcomes in controlled physical performance tests and holds promise to be applied to training or competition settings.
keywords:

Resistance exercise, Post-activation potentiation, Neuromuscular performance, Physiology biomarkers, Autonomic nervous system

 
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