Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
Current Issue Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Archive Ethical standards and procedures Contact Instructions for authors Journal's Reviewers Special Information
SCImago Journal & Country Rank


1/2022
vol. 39
 
Share:
Share:
more
 
 
abstract:
Original paper

Are acute player workloads associated with in-game performance in basketball?

Jordan L. Fox
1, 2
,
Robert Stanton
1, 3
,
Cody J. O’Grady
1, 2
,
Masaru Teramoto
4
,
Charli Sargent
3
,
Aaron T. Scanlan
1, 2

1.
School of Health, Medical, and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
2.
Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
3.
Appleton Institute for Behavioural Sciences, Central Queensland University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
4.
School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Biol Sport. 2022;39(1):95–100.
Online publish date: 2021/03/06
View full text
Get citation
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
To investigate associations between acute workload and in-game performance in basketball. Eight semi-professional, male basketball players were monitored during all training sessions (N = 28) and games (N = 18) across the season. External workload was determined using absolute (arbitrary units[AU]) and relative (AU·min-1) PlayerLoadTM (PL), and absolute (count) and relative (count·min-1) low-intensity, mediumintensity, high-intensity, and total Inertial Movement Analysis (IMA) events (accelerations, decelerations, changesof-direction, and jumps). Internal workload was determined using absolute and relative Summated-Heart-RateZones workload, session-rating of perceived exertion, rating of perceived exertion, and time (min) spent working > 90% of maximal heart rate. In-game performance was indicated by the player efficiency statistic. Repeated measures correlations were used to determine associations between acute workload variables (across the previous 7 days) and player efficiency. Relative PL (r = 0.13, small) and high-intensity IMA events (r = 0.13, small) possessed the strongest associations with player efficiency of the investigated workload variables (P > 0.05). All other associations were trivial in magnitude (P > 0.05). Given the trivial-small associations between all external and internal workload variables and player efficiency, basketball practitioners should not rely solely on monitoring acute workloads to determine performance potential in players.
keywords:

Team sport, Training prescription, Microsensor, RPE, Heart rate

 
Quick links
© 2022 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.