Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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3/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Caffeine supplementation improves physical performance without affecting fatigue level: a double-blind crossover study

Yuri Campos
1, 2
,
Ángel Lago-Rodríguez
3
,
Alejandro F. San Juan
4
,
Victor Moreno-Pérez
5
,
Alvaro Lopez-Samanes
6
,
Antonio J. Sánchez-Oliver
2, 7
,
Sandro F. Da Silva
2
,
Raúl Domínguez
2, 7

1.
Postgraduate Program of the Faculty of Physical Education and Sports of the University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil
2.
Study Group and Research in Neuromuscular Responses, University of Lavras, Brazil
3.
Faculty of Health Sciences, University Isabel I, Spain
4.
Department of Health and Human Performance, Sport Biomechanics Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
5.
Center for Translational Research in Physiotherapy, Department of Pathology and Surgery, Miguel Hernández University
6.
School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, Spain
7.
Departamento de Motricidad Humana y Rendimiento Deportivo, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain
Biol Sport. 2022;39(3):521–528
Online publish date: 2021/07/08
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This study examined the effect of caffeine supplementation (CAFF) in a Wingate test (WT), and the behaviour of blood lactate concentrations (BLa) and neuromuscular fatigue (NMF), measured as reduced countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, in response to the WT. In a double-blind crossover study, 16 participants attended the laboratory twice, separated by a 72-hour window. In the sessions, participants first ingested 6 mg·kg-1 of either CAFF or placebo (PLAC), and then performed a WT. BLa was measured before (L-pre), and 0.5 min (L-post-0.5) and 3.5 min (L-post-3.5) after conducting the WT. The CMJ test was conducted before (CMJ pre), after (CMJ post), and 3 min after completing (CMJ post-3) the WT. The results indicated that CAFF enhanced peak power (Wpeak: + 3.22%; p = 0.040), time taken to reach Wpeak (T_Wpeak: -18.76%; p = 0.001) and mean power (Wmean: + 2.7%; p = 0.020). A higher BLa was recorded for CAFF at L-post-0.5 (+ 13.29%; p = 0.009) and L-post-3.5 (+ 10.51%; p = 0.044) compared to PLAC. CAFF improved peak power (PP; + 3.44%; p = 0.003) and mean power (MP; + 4.78%; p = 0.006) at CMJ pre, compared to PLAC, whereas PP and MP were significantly diminished at CMJ post and CMJ post-3 compared to pre (p < 0.001 for all comparisons) under both the CAFF and PLAC conditions. PP and MP were increased at post-3 compared to post (p < 0.001 for all comparisons) for both conditions. In conclusion, CAFF increased WT performance and BLa without affecting NMF measured by CMJ. Thus, CAFF may allow athletes to train with higher workloads and enhance the supercompensation effects after an adequate recovery period.
keywords:

Countermovement jump, Ergogenic aids, Glycolytic metabolism, Lactate, Sport nutrition, Wingate

 
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