Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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3/2020
vol. 37
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Comparison of effects of training order of explosive strength and plyometrics training on different physical abilities in adolescent handball players

Roland van den Tillaar
1
,
Truls Valland Roaas
1
,
Dustin Oranchuk
2

1.
Department of Sport Sciences and Physical Education, Nord University, Levanger, Norway
2.
Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT, Auckland, New Zealand
Biol Sport. 2020;37(3):239–246
Online publish date: 2020/06/02
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While both plyometric and traditional resistance training methods are beneficial to athletic performance in a wide range of sports, their efficacy regarding training order has yet to be determined in a periodized training programme. Therefore, this study compared the effects of a 12-week training period where explosive strength training (six weeks) preceded plyometric training (six weeks), or vice versa. Forty-two competitive male (n = 12) and female (n = 30) adolescent handball players (age 14.9 ± 0.5 years, body mass 64.1 ± 9.1 kg, height 1.71 ± 0.09 m) conducted explosive strength training for six weeks followed by six weeks of plyometric training or vice versa. Variables included a 30 m sprint, a change of direction test, countermovement jump (CMJ) with and without arm swing, load-velocity back squat assessment, overhead throwing velocity with and without preliminary steps, and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1). Both groups experienced similar improvements in the CMJ, change of direction and load-velocity squat assessments from pre- to posttest (p ≤ 0.013, η2 = 0.194–0.378). Conversely, no improvements were observed in the Yo-Yo IR1, 30 m sprint or throwing velocity tests, regardless of group (p ≥ 0.081). No main effect of training order was observed for any of the tests employed (p ≥ 0.31). Training order does not appear to play a noticeable role in the physical development of young handball players. Therefore, practitioners could focus on implementing variations in exercise and loading to benefit athlete adherence and correspond to present needs.
keywords:

Complex training Countermovement jump Throwing Change of direction Yo-Yo IR1 Sprinting Youth

 
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