Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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3/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Effects of a resistance training intervention on the strength-deficit of elite young soccer players

Irineu Loturco
1, 2, 3
,
Lucas A. Pereira
1, 2
,
Chris Bishop
4
,
Vinicius Zanetti
5
,
Tomás T. Freitas
1, 6, 7
,
Fernando Pareja-Blanco
8, 9

1.
NAR – Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, São Paulo, Brazil
2.
Department of Human Movement Sciences, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
3.
University of South Wales, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom
4.
Faculty of Science and Technology, London Sports Institute, Middlesex University, London, UK
5.
Red Bull Brazil Football, Jarinú, Brazil
6.
Faculty of Sports Sciences, Catholic University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain
7.
UCAM Research Center for High Performance Sport – Catholic University of Murcia, UCAM, Spain
8.
Physical Performance and Sports Research Center, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain
9.
Faculty of Sports Sciences, Department of Sports and Computers Sciences, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain
Biol Sport. 2022;39(3):615–619.
Online publish date: 2021/07/28
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The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a traditional resistance training scheme on the relative strength (RS), relative peak-force (RPF), strength deficit (SDef), and vertical jump and sprint abilities in elite young soccer players. Thirty-five under-20 soccer players from two professional clubs were assessed before and after a 4-week competitive period. One team performed 12 sessions of a structured resistance training program and the other maintained their regular soccer-specific training and competitive routines. Resistance training sessions consisted of half-squat and jump-squat exercises at intensities of 30–80% of the one-repetition maximum. Both teams performed pre- and post-measurements in the following order: (1) countermovement jump (CMJ), (2) 20-m sprint, and (3) half-squat one-repetition maximum to determine the RS, RPF, and SDef. A two-way analysis of variance was used to test for group x time interaction among variables. Effect sizes (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were also calculated. Group x time interactions were demonstrated for RS ([ES [95%CI] = 1.21 [0.57; 1.85], P = 0.001), RPF (ES [95%CI] = 1.18 [0.52; 1.80], P = 0.001), SDef (ES [95%CI] = 0.86 [0.01; 1.71], P = 0.04), and CMJ (ES [95%CI] = 0.64 [0.28; 0.99], P  =  0.001); whereas a  non-significant interaction was observed for 20-m sprint performance (ES [95%CI] = 0.02 [-0.32; 0.36], P = 0.85). Traditional strength-power oriented training resulted in improved maximum strength performance and CMJ ability but, paradoxically, increased the SDef. As a consequence, stronger athletes are not necessarily able to use greater percentages of their peak-force against relatively lighter loads.
keywords:

Team-sports, Athletic performance, Muscle power, Maximum dynamic strength, Elite athletes

 
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