Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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1/2023
vol. 40
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Effects of climbing- and resistance-training on climbing-specific performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Nicolay Stien
1
,
Amund Riiser
1
,
Matthew P. Shaw
1
,
Atle H. Saeterbakken
1
,
Vidar Andersen
1

1.
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway
Biol Sport. 2023;40(1):179–191.
Online publish date: 2022/02/18
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The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the effects of climbing and climbing-and-resistance-training on climbing performance, and strength and endurance tests. We systematically searched three databases (SPORTDiscus, SCOPUS, and PubMed) for records published until January 2021. The search was limited to randomized-controlled trials using active climbers and measuring climbing performance or performance in climbing-specific tests. Data from the meta-analysis are presented as standardized difference in mean (SDM) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Eleven studies are included in the systematic review and five studies compared training to a control group and could be meta-analyzed. The overall meta-analysis displayed an improvement in climbing-related test performance following climbing-specific resistance training compared to only climbing (SDM = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.24–0.91). Further analyses revealed that finger strength (SDM = 0.41, 95%CI 0.03–0.80), rate of force development (SDM = 0.91, 95%CI = 0.21–1.61), and forearm endurance (SDM = 1.23, 95%CI = 0.69–1.77) were improved by resistance-training of the finger flexors compared to climbing training. The systematic review showed that climbing performance may be improved by specific resistancetraining or interval-style bouldering. However, resistance-training of the finger flexors showed no improvements in strength or endurance in climbing-specific tests. The available evidence suggests that resistance-training may be more effective than just climbing-training for improving performance outcomes. Importantly, interventional studies including climbers is limited and more research is needed to confirm these findings.
keywords:

Exercise, Strength, Skill, Testing, Climbers

 
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