Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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3/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Estimation of peak vertical velocity and relative load changes by subjective measures in weightlifting movements

Mark Chapman
1
,
Sam Damian Tomkins
1
,
Travis N Triplett
2
,
Eneko Larumbe-Zabala
3
,
Fernando Naclerio
1

1.
Institute for Lifecourse Development, School of Human Sciences, Centre for Exercise Activity and Rehabilitation, University of Greenwich, UK
2.
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA
3.
School of Doctorate and Research, European University of Madrid, Spain
Biol Sport. 2022;39(3):639–646.
Online publish date: 2021/08/27
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To investigate the ability of the OMNI-RES (0–10) scale to estimate velocity and loading changes during sets to failure in the hang power clean (HPC) exercise. Eleven recreationally resistance-trained males (28.5 ± 3.5 years) with an average one-repetition maximum (1RM) value of 1.1 ± 0.07 kg body mass-1 in HPC, were assessed on five separate days with 48 hours of rest between sessions. After determining the 1RM value, participants performed four sets to self-determined failure with the following relative loading ranges: 60% < 70%, 70 < 80%, 80 < 90% and > 90%. The peak vertical velocity (PVV), and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were measured for every repetition of each set. The RPE expressed after the first repetition (RPE-1) and when the highest value of PVV was achieved during the set (RPE-max) were similar and significantly lower than the RPE associated with a 5% (RPE-5%) and 10% (RPE-10%) drop in PVV. In addition, the RPE produced at failure was similar to RPE-5% only for the heaviest range (≥ 90%). Furthermore, RPE-1 was useful to distinguish loading zones between the four assessed ranges (60 < 70%, vs. 70 < 80%, vs. 80 < 90%, vs. ≥ 90%). The RPE seems to be useful to identify PVV changes (maximal, 5% and 10% drop) during continuous sets to self-determined failure and to distinguish 10% loading zone increments, from 60 to 100% of 1RM in the HPC exercise.
keywords:

OMNI-RES (0–10) scale, Perceived Exertion, Hang Power Clean, Velocity-based training

 
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