eISSN: 1644-4124
ISSN: 1426-3912
Central European Journal of Immunology
Current issue Archive Manuscripts accepted About the journal Editorial board Abstracting and indexing Subscription Contact Instructions for authors Ethical standards and procedures
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
2/2021
vol. 46
 
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abstract:
Experimental immunology

Mixed cultures of allogeneic dendritic cells are phenotypically and functionally stable – a potential for primary cell-based “off the shelf” product generation

Urban Švajger
1, 2
,
Primož J. Rožman
1

1.
Blood Transfusion Center of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia
2.
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Cent Eur J Immunol 2021; 46 (2): 152-161
Online publish date: 2021/07/14
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Vaccination against tumors using antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccines has greatly evolved over the last decade, with hundreds of active human clinical trials well on the way. The use of an autologous source for DC-based vaccine therapeutics remains the obvious choice in the majority of clinical studies; however, novel evidence suggests that an allogeneic source of DCs can yield success if administered in the right context. One of the challenges facing successful DC vaccination protocols is the generation of large enough numbers of DCs intended for vaccination and standardization of these procedures. In addition, variations in the quality of DC vaccines due to donor-to-donor variation represent an important therapeutic factor. To this day it has not been shown whether DCs from different donors can readily co-exist within the same co-culture for the extended periods required for vaccine manufacture. We demonstrate that generation of allogeneic DC co-cultures, generated from multiple unrelated donors, allows the preservation of their phenotypical and functional properties in vitro for up to 72 hours. Therefore, in the case of an allogeneic vaccination approach, one could ensure large numbers of DCs generated from a primary cell source intended for multiple vaccinations. By generating large amounts of ex vivo manufactured DCs from multiple donors, this would represent the possibility to ensure sufficient amounts of equipotent “off the shelf” product that could e.g. be used for an entire cohort of patients within a study.
keywords:

dendritic cells, allogeneic, cancer vaccines, tumor immunity

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