Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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abstract:
Original paper

Resisted sprint training with partner towing improves explosive force and sprint performance in young soccer players- a pilot study

Anis Chaalali
1
,
Khalil Bouriel
1
,
Mehdi Rouissi
1
,
Moktar Chtara
1
,
Bessem Mkaouer
2
,
John Cronin
3
,
Anis Chaouachi
1, 3, 4
,
Karim Chamari
5

1.
Tunisian Research Laboratory “Sport Performance Optimization”, National Center of Medicine and science in Sports, Tunis, Tunisia
2.
Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Ksar Said, Manouba University, Tunisia
3.
School of Sport and Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, New-Zealand
4.
Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax,Sfax University, Tunisia
5.
ASPETAR, Qatar Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar
Biol Sport. 2022;39(2):379–387.
Online publish date: 2021/04/30
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The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of non-resisted (NRS) and partner-towing resisted (RS) sprint training on legs explosive force, sprint performance and sprint kinematic parameters. Sixteen young elite soccer players (age 16.6 ± 0.2 years, height 175.6 ± 5.7 cm, and body mass 67.6 ± 8.2 kg) were randomly allocated to two training groups: resisted sprint RS (n = 7) and non-resisted sprint NRS (n = 9). The RS group followed a six-week sprint training programme consisting of two “sprint training sessions” per week in addition to their usual soccer training. The NRS group followed a similar sprint training programme, replicating the distances of sprints but without any added resistance. All players were assessed before and after training: vertical and horizontal jumping (countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and 5-jump test (5JT)), 30 m sprint performance (5, 10, and 20 m split times), and running kinematics (stride length and frequency). In the RS group significant (p < 0.05) changes were: decreased sprint time for 0–5 m, 0–10 m and 0–30 m (-6.31, -5.73 and -2.00%; effect size (ES) = 0.70, 1.00 and 0.41, respectively); higher peak jumping height (4.23% and 3.59%; ES = 0.35 and 0.37, for SJ and CMJ respectively); and 5JT (3.10%; ES = 0.44); and increased stride frequency (3.96%; ES = 0.76). In the NRS group, significant (p < 0.05) changes were: decreased sprint time at 0–30 m (-1.34%, ES = 0.33) and increased stride length (1.21%; ES = 0.17). RS training (partner towing) for six weeks in young soccer players showed more effective performances in sprint, stride frequency and lower-limb explosive force, while NRS training improved sprint performance at 0–30 m and stride length. Consequently, coaches and physical trainers should consider including RS training as part of their sprint training to ensure optimal sprint performance.
keywords:

Sprint harness, Sprint acceleration, Strength training, Stride length, Stride frequency

 
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