eISSN: 2084-9885
ISSN: 1896-6764
Neuropsychiatria i Neuropsychologia/Neuropsychiatry and Neuropsychology
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SCImago Journal & Country Rank
1-2/2020
vol. 15
 
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abstract:
Review article

Review of non-specific eating disorders

Michalina Wiktoria Mróz
1
,
Emilia Korek
2

1.
Studentka Wydziału Medycznego, kierunek Dietetyka, Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu
2.
Katedra i Zakład Fizjologii, Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu
Neuropsychiatria i Neuropsychologia 2020; 15, 1–2: 42–50
Online publish date: 2020/07/25
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Eating disorders are being described more and more often. In addition to anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) relatively often, there are other non-specific eating disorders. These include binge eating disorder, night eating syndrome, rumination syndrome, pica, muscle dysmorphia, orthorexia, pregorexia and diabulimia. The frequency of their occurrence is not exactly known; however, compared to AN and BN, they are rare. Very often they do not give consistent clinical symptoms, which significantly hinders their diagnosis and treatment. There is also no consensus regarding diagnostics criteria and treatment methods. Binge eating disorders, rumination syndrome and pica are classified in DSM-5 as separate disease entities, and night eating syndrome is in the category of “other specified feeding or eating disorders”, whereas muscle dysmorphia, orthorexia, pregorexia and diabulimia were not included in this classification at all. In addition to somatic complications, e.g. weight loss/gain, electrolyte disturbances, and food deficiencies, these disorders often cause problems in everyday functioning, e.g. avoiding work or eating meals in the company of other people. In addition, they can lead to AN or BN and coexist with other mental disorders and illnesses, e.g. depression, schizophrenia or anxiety disorders. Therefore, the approach to patients struggling with atypical eating disorders should be holistic. It is best if, depending on the patient’s needs, it includes cooperation with a doctor, dietitian, nurse, psychologist and physiotherapist.
keywords:

eating disorders, night eating syndrome, pica

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