Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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4/2021
vol. 38
 
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abstract:
Original paper

The effect of a daytime 60-min nap opportunity on postural control in highly active individuals

Achraf Ammar
1, 2
,
Omar Boukhris
3, 4
,
Hsen Hsouna
3, 4
,
Imen Ben Dhia
3, 5
,
Khaled Trabelsi
3, 6
,
Tariq Ali Gujar
1
,
Cain C.T Clark
7
,
Hamdi Chtourou
3, 4
,
Tarak Driss
2
,
Anita Hoekelmann
1

1.
Institute of Sport Science, Otto-von-Guericke University, 39106, Magdeburg, Germany
2.
Interdisciplinary Laboratory in Neurosciences, Physiology and Psychology: Physical Activity, Health and Learning (LINP2), UFR STAPS, UPL, Paris Nanterre University, Nanterre, France
3.
High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax, University of Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia
4.
Physical Activity, Sport, and Health, UR18JS01, National Observatory of Sport, Tunis, Tunisia
5.
Research laboratory of evaluation and management of musculoskeletal system pathologies, LR20ES09 University of Sfax, Sfax Tunisia
6.
Research Laboratory: Education, Motricity, Sport and Health, EM2S, LR19JS01, University of Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia
7.
Centre for Intelligent Healthcare, Coventry University, Coventry, CV1 5FB, UK
Biol Sport. 2021;38(4):683–691.
Online publish date: 2021/03/05
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Although napping is commonly used as a strategy to improve numerous physical and cognitive performances, the efficacy of this strategy for improving postural balance has not yet been elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a comprehensive examination of the effect of a 60 min nap opportunity (N60) on different components of postural control. Ten highly active individuals (age = 27 ± 3.5 y, height = 1.75 ± 0.52 m, weight = 66.02 ± 8.63 kg) performed, in a randomized order, two afternoon test sessions following no nap (NN) and N60. Postural balance was assessed using the sensory organisation test (SOT), the unilateral stance test (UST), and the limits of Stability Test performed on NeuroCom® Smart Balance Master. The subjective rating of sleepiness before and after the nap conditions was also assessed. Compared to NN, N60 improved the composite balance score (p < 0.05, ES = 0.75, Δ = 5.3%) and the average and maximum percentage balance in the most challenging postural conditions of the SOT (p < 0.05 for SOT-4 and 5 and p < 0.0005 for SOT-6; ES range between 0.58 and 1.1). This enhanced postural balance in N60 was accompanied with improved visual (p < 0.05; ES = 0.93; Δ = 8.9%) and vestibular (p < 0.05; ES = 0.81; Δ = 10.5%) ratios and a reduced level of sleepiness perception (p < 0.001, ES = 0.87). However, no significant differences were found in any of the UST and LOS components’ scores (p > 0.05). Overall, a 60 min post lunch nap opportunity may be viable for improving static balance, although further work, involving larger samples and more complex motor activities, is warranted.
keywords:

Balance, Nap, Athletes, Students, Motor skills, Sensory systems

 
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