Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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2/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Training, psychometric status, biological markers and neuromuscular fatigue in soccer

Okba Selmi
1, 2
,
Ibrahim Ouergui
1
,
Danielle E Levitt
3, 4
,
Hamza Marzouki
1
,
Beat Knechtle
5, 6
,
Pantelis T. Nikolaidis
7, 8
,
Anissa Bouassida
1

1.
High Institute of Sports and Physical Education of Kef, University of Jendouba, Kef, Tunisia
2.
High Institute of Sports and Physical Education, Ksar Said, University of Manouba, Tunis, Tunisia
3.
Applied Physiology Laboratory, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA
4.
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA
5.
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Nikaia, Greece
6.
School of Health and Caring Sciences, University of West Attica, Athens, Greece
7.
Institute of Primary Care, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
8.
Medbase St. Gallen Am Vadianplatz, St. Gallen, Switzerland
Biol Sport. 2022;39(2):319–327.
Online publish date: 2021/04/09
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The study examined the relationship between psychometric status, neuromuscular, and biochemical markers of fatigue in response to an intensified training (IT) period in soccer. Fifteen professional soccer players volunteered to participate in the study (mean ± SD: age: 25 ± 1 years; body height: 179 ± 7 cm, body mass: 73.7 ± 16.2 kg, experience: 13.2 ± 3 years). Training load, monotony, strain, Hooper index and total quality recovery (TQR) were determined for each training session during a 2-week of IT. Counter-movement jump (CMJ) and biochemical responses [testosterone, cortisol, testosterone-to-cortisol ratio (T/C ratio), creatine kinase, and C-reactive protein] were collected before and after IT. Results showed that IT induced significant increases in cortisol, creatine kinase and C-reactive protein and significant decreases in T/C ratio and CMJ performance from before to after IT (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). However, testosterone did not differ from before to after IT (p > 0.05). Training loads were positively correlated with Hooper index (p < 0.05) and negatively correlated with total quality recovery (p < 0.05). Hooper index was positively correlated with cortisol (p < 0.05), T/C ratio (p < 0.01), and creatine kinase (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with CMJ (p < 0.05). Furthermore, TQR was negatively correlated with T/C ratio (p < 0.01), creatine kinase (p < 0.001), and C-reactive protein (p < 0.05), and positively correlated with CMJ (p < 0.01). Neuromuscular fatigue, muscle damage, and change in the anabolic/catabolic state induced by the IT were related to well-being and perceived recovery state among professional soccer players.
keywords:

Training load, Fatigue, Well-being, Recovery, Testosterone, Cortisol

 
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