Biology of Sport
eISSN: 2083-1862
ISSN: 0860-021X
Biology of Sport
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1/2022
vol. 39
 
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abstract:
Original paper

Transfer of strength training to running mechanics, energetics, and efficiency

Jorge L. Storniolo
1
,
Gabriela Fischer
2
,
Renata Bona
3
,
Alexandre Pinho
4
,
Alex P. Moorhead
5
,
Marcus Tartaruga
6
,
Paula Finatto
7
,
Leonardo Peyré-Tartaruga
7

1.
Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2.
Laboratory of Biomechanics, Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil
3.
Biomechanics Research and Movement Analyses Laboratory, CENUR Litoral Norte, Universidad de la República, Paysandú, Uruguay
4.
Movement Analysis and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Federal University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, Brazil
5.
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy
6.
State University of Mid-Western Paraná. Laboratory of Biomechanics and Energetics of the Human Movement. Guarapuava, PR, Brazil
7.
Exercise Research Laboratory, Escola de Educação Física, Fisioterapia e Dança, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Biol Sport. 2022;39(1):199–206.
Online publish date: 2021/03/06
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To examine the effects of increased strength on mechanical work, the metabolic cost of transport (Cost), and mechanical efficiency (ME) during running. Fourteen physically active men (22.0 ± 2.0 years, 79.3 ± 11.1 kg) were randomized to a strength-training group (SG, n = 7), who participated in a maximal strength training protocol lasting 8 weeks, and a control group (CG, n = 7), which did not perform any training intervention. Metabolic and kinematic data were collected simultaneously while running at a constant speed (2.78 m·s-1). The ME was defined as the ratio between mechanical power (Pmec) and metabolic power (Pmet). The repeated measures two-way ANOVA did not show any significant interaction between groups, despite some large effect sizes (d): internal work (Wint, p = 0.265, d = -1.37), external work (Wext, p = 0.888, d = 0.21), total work (Wtot, p = 0.931, d = -0.17), Pmec (p = 0.917, d = -0.17), step length (SL, p = 0.941, d = 0.24), step frequency (SF, p = 0.814, d = -0.18), contact time (CT, p = 0.120, d = -0.79), aerial time (AT, p = 0.266, d = 1.12), Pmet (p = 0.088, d = 0.85), and ME (p = 0.329, d = 0.54). The exception was a significant decrease in Cost (p = 0.047, d = 0.84) in SG. The paired t-test and Wilcoxon test only detected intragroup differences (pre- vs. post-training) for SG, showing a higher CT (p = 0.041), and a lower Cost (p = 0.003) and Pmet (p = 0.004). The results indicate that improved neuromuscular factors related to strength training may be responsible for the higher metabolic economy of running after 8 weeks of intervention. However, this process was unable to alter running mechanics in order to indicate a significant improvement in ME.
keywords:

Locomotion, Intervention, Concurrent, Running economy, Kinematics

 
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