eISSN: 2084-9834
ISSN: 0034-6233
Reumatologia/Rheumatology
Bieżący numer Archiwum Artykuły zaakceptowane O czasopiśmie Suplementy Rada naukowa Bazy indeksacyjne Prenumerata Kontakt Zasady publikacji prac
NOWOŚĆ
Portal dla reumatologów!
www.ereumatologia.pl
SCImago Journal & Country Rank
 
1/2011
vol. 49
 
Poleć ten artykuł:
Udostępnij:
więcej
 
 
Artykuł redakcyjny

Angiogeneza w reumatoidalnym zapaleniu stawów

Anna Kotulska
,
Eugeniusz J. Kucharz

Reumatologia 2011; 49, 1: 1–9
Data publikacji online: 2011/03/16
Plik artykułu:
Pobierz cytowanie
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 
Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are processes through which new blood vessels are formed.

Vasculogenesis is a term that describes the formation of primary blood vessels during embryogenesis. The first blood vessels are formed from mesenchyme-derived precursor cells called angioblasts, which differentiate in avascular tissue into endothelial cells and proliferate to form the primary capillary plexus. The vascular network thus created is crucial for the development of all organs during embryogenesis. The circulatory system is the first to develop.

Angiogenesis is a term that describes the process of formation of new blood vessels, taking place, for the most part, outside the period of foetal development. New vessels are formed through a process of budding, growth, branching and invagination of elements of the pre-existing vascular system [1].

Since the times of Claudius Galen (129–199), who observed that vessels are filled with blood, not air; of Sir William Harvey (1578–1657), who discovered the circulation of blood; and of John Hunter (1728–1793), who was the first to use the term “angiogenesis” to describe the growth of blood vessels in reindeer antlers, many mechanisms regulating the development of new vessels, both in physiological and pathological states, have been discovered. The first true interest in angiogenesis in medicine may be dated back to Judah Folkman’s papers, written in the 1980s. Folkman demonstrated that limiting the process of new blood vessel formation suppresses tumour growth.

A key role in angiogenesis is played by endothelial cells, which have many physiological functions, participate in inflammatory processes and determine the permeability and rebuilding of newly formed blood vessels. Formation of blood vessels in the human body is essential for its normal growth and functioning, particularly the processes of continuous tissue regeneration taking place, for instance, in the endometrium during the course of female menstrual cycles or in the process of wound healing [2], as well as in muscles in response to physical exertion [3]. In pathological states, angiogenesis may be intensified or inhibited, i.e. the process of new vessel formation may be increased or reduced. An increase in the number, size and length of blood vessels occurs with the formation of solid tumours or haematological malignancies and metastases, inflammatory tumours, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, in stomach and duodenal ulcers, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, in diabetic retinopathy, retinitis, and keratitis [4, 5]. On the other hand, insufficient blood vessel formation in pathological states occurs in systemic sclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and ischemia of the lower extremities [6]. In systemic sclerosis, the dermal capillary density was reduced by at least 70% when compared to a control group of healthy subjects [7].

Irrespective of their size, blood vessels primarily deliver oxygen and nutrients to the tissues they supply. Angiogenesis may be initiated rapidly in response to a deficiency in oxygen supply or ischemia of an organ, if conditions exist for the activation of this process [8]. Thus, the cells of the endothelium must undergo reverse differentiation, a reduction in their adhesion by the severing of intercellular connections, and a subsequent increase in endothelial permeability. The dissolution of the basement membrane and activation of angiogenic factors are necessary to enable activated endothelial cells to infiltrate new areas. Migrating endothelial cells must maintain contact with the extracellular substance of the connective tissue through haptotaxis, and there is a simultaneous activation of mechanisms neutralising apoptosis of the extravasating cells. Rapid proliferation of endothelial cells is essential for the further development of the budding vessel. The cells, migrating through the stroma, line up one behind the other, elongate, and a lumen develops within the budding vessel. A new, functional blood vessel is formed. Connections with other vessels and the formation of a system of blood vessels enable blood flow. The next stage sees the formation of a three-dimensional network of branched vessels. Interaction between endothelial cells and the extracellular matrix is essential for the stabilization of the blood vessel network [9]. While proteolytic enzymes, metalloproteinases, plasmin formed from plasminogen and other biologically active molecules of extracellular matrix degradation have an important part to play in the process of endothelial cell extravasation in the first stage of angiogenesis, a significant role in the stabilization of newly formed vessels is played by cell adhesion molecules, the platelet-derived growth factor, angiopoietins, and also, to a varying degree, non-striated muscle cells. Under physiological conditions, it is important that the process of angiogenesis be maintained; this requires all its stages to proceed normally while simultaneously maintaining a balance between factors that stimulate and inhibit this process.

Under pathological conditions, angiogenesis is essential for the growth of tissues that develop in the course of the disease process, such as neoplastic or inflammatory tumours. This non-physiological tissue growth is accompanied by a predominance of the formation of new vessels, which indicates an imbalance between factors stimulating and inhibiting angiogenesis. The process we have gained the most insight into is angiogenesis in oncology, although we still possess insufficient knowledge about factors that stimulate proangiogenic processes leading to the intensive formation and growth of new vessels, delivering nutrients to the cells of the rapidly expanding neoplastic growth. An additional focus of studies into angiogenesis in oncology is the aspect concerning potential cancer therapy [10].

Much less is known about the role angiogenesis plays in non-neoplastic diseases. In view of the strong connection between angiogenesis regulation and factors such as mediators of the immune process and factors regulating inflammatory processes, it appears that studying the regulation of angiogenesis in benign diseases may also provide an insight into their pathogenesis.

Inflammation is a set of responses by the body to the action of various damaging factors, the aim of which is to limit, isolate and eliminate the harmful factor and enable the healing process to take place. Inflammation is associated with proliferation, migration and activation of cells present in tissues and infiltrating from other locations, which may be exceptionally damaging to normal tissue.

Inflammation is a significant element in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is non-specific in character and primarily involves the synovial membranes, leading to severe joint damage. In the course of chronic rheumatoid arthritis, synovial membranes thicken significantly, forming numerous villous folds that project into the articular cavity. The number of macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B synovial cells increases. Numerous mononuclear cell infiltrations appear, made up of T and B cells, macrophages, and plasma cells. The hyperplastic synovial membrane covers the whole articular surface and forms a pannus, initially highly vascularized and exhibiting inflammatory changes. The cartilage undergoes destruction along with the formation of bone erosions [11]. Hyperplasia of the synovial membrane indicates the presence of intense angiogenesis within the joints. Hyperplasia of the tissue lining the joints leads to its hypoxia and ischemia, and these factors provide additional stimulus for the formation of numerous capillaries. The newly created network of blood vessels delivers oxygen and nutrients, and cytokines and growth factors, not only those secreted locally, which exert an effect sustaining both inflammation as well as angiogenesis. One may presume that even a slight extension of a capillary may facilitate the growth of a very large number of cells.

Angiogenesis is a significant component of the pathogenesis of changes taking place within the joints in the course of RA [12]. The process of formation of new vessels is regulated by many substances, however their precise mechanisms of action remain unknown, because most investigations have been carried out on isolated cells examined in vitro or using tissue cultures.

Observations regarding factors regulating angiogenesis in RA may be divided into:

• occurrences indicating intensive angiogenic activity (angiogenic factors in the synovial membrane, articular fluid, or in the serum),

• the association between angiogenesis and arthritis,

• controlled regulation of angiogenesis (e.g. the effect of medications that modify the course of the disease).

There are many known pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, that act both directly and indirectly, which are not, however, specific to just this one process but which perform many other functions. The main groups of angiogenesis mediators include: growth factors, pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, extracellular matrix elements, cell adhesion molecules, proteases, envi­ronmental factors, apoptosis inhibitors and others. The majority of these factors are involved in the development of inflammation, which applies particularly to cytokines. Among factors identified as angiogenesis inhibitors there are: endogenic factors, exogenic factors, and inhibitors of some of the pro-angiogenic factors mentioned above (tab. I) [8]. An interesting fact is that a large proportion of angiostatic factors are fragments of large proteins that have other functions, such as angiostatin and endostatin.

Numerous studies of patients with RA have revealed changes in the concentration of all the main angiogenic factors in joint tissues, joint fluid, and often also in the serum. The correlations existing between the concentrations of some of these factors and the cytokines that generate inflammation have also been confirmed. It is thought that initially, as a result of hypoxia, the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) appears within the joint, as evidenced by its increased expression in synoviocytes and T-lymphocytes isolated from synovial membrane infiltrations [13]. HIF causes the release of proangiogenic factors, of which the main and best known to date are proteins belonging to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. These are among the strongest acting factors that stimulate and maintain the process of new vessel formation in newly forming tissues. This leads to increased vessel permeability and to the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Mononuclear cells, which release VEGF in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines, also elevate VEGF levels and affect the accumulation of this factor. One protein in particular, VEGF-C, is induced by TNF- and interleukin-1, but not by hypoxia. Increased expression of VEGF-C is observed in the synovial membrane of joints affected by the rheumatoid process, in pericytes and in non-striated muscle tissue in blood vessels [14]. Similarly, increased expression of the VEGF isoform 165 is accompanied by increased capillary density in the rheumatoid synovium [15]. The number of microvessels, assessed using VEGF and VEGF receptor complex (VEGF/VEGFR) monoclonal antibodies, is clearly higher in the tissues of patients with RA than those affected by the degenerative disease or in healthy synovial membrane [16]. In addition to local shifts, VEGF content increases in the body as a whole, and its serum concentration correlates with both the concentration of C-reactive protein [17], as well as with radiological changes in the hands and feet that appear during the first year of the disease – the period of the most intensive angiogenesis [18].

Most factors taking part in the inflammatory process have been shown to possess pro-angiogenic activity. Among them there are interleukins (interleukin 1, 6, 8 and 18) and TNF-, and also chemokines displaying a conserved ELR motif (glutamic acid-leucine-arginine sequence). They participate in the induction of the influx of inflammatory cells and promote angiogenesis in articular synovial membrane. CXC chemokines, which lack the ELR sequence, inhibit the development of new vessels [19].

TNF- regulates angiogenesis through a different pro-angiogenic factor – angiopoietin 1 (Ang-1) together with the endothelial tyrosine kinase receptor (Tie-2) [20]. This system stabilises newly formed vessels [8]. Another pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-18, stimulates the production of VEGF proteins and SDF-1/CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1/chemokine ligand 12), another pro-angiogenic complex, by fibroblasts in the synovial membrane.

Integrins are glycoproteins that belong to a family of adhesive proteins. They are made up of two subunits,  and . Among molecules that participate in adhesion to endothelial cells, the best known is v3 integrin. It is a mediator of angiogenesis in diseased synovium, and also in the process of bone resorption in patients with RA [8]. It has been demonstrated that the v subunit of this integrin is encoded by the ITGAV gene. An ITGAVrs3738919-C gene allele is associated with increased susceptibility to RA in the European Caucasian population [21]. Animal model studies of arthritis have shown that anti-v3 integrin antibodies inhibit angiogenesis in the synovial membrane [22], however the results of phase II clinical studies in humans have not been unequivocal.

Endothelin-1 is a peptide that produces a vasoconstrictive response. It is secreted by endothelial cells in blood vessels and its physiological role is to maintain vascular tone and perfusion [23]. Significantly increased endothelin-1 concentrations are observed in the articular fluid and in the serum of patients with RA. It is an important mediator for inducing VEGF production, and thus indirect stimulation of intra-articular angiogenesis.

Joints, whose rapidly growing tissues are the site of intensive angiogenesis, possess insufficient amounts of endogenic factors that would inhibit this process. Two among them – angiostatin (a plasminogen fragment) [24] and endostatin (a fragment of collagen XVIII) [25] act through an v3 integrin-dependent mechanism [20]. Angiostatin, binding with v3 integrin, disrupts the transmission of signals necessary for the promotion of angiogenesis, mediated by v3 integrin. Moreover, angiostatin inhibits endothelial cell and smooth muscle reactions to the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by acting as a competitive antagonist, whereas it does not affect stimulation that is the result of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) activity. Endostatin also inhibits synovial membrane proliferation and joint destruction [22].

The complex regulation of angiogenesis suggests the possibility of pharmacological control of this process. Most papers address the angiostatic action of substances with potential anti-neoplastic activity. A few observations have been made on medications used in the treatment of patients with RA. Infliximab in combination with methotrexate inhibit intra-articular and systemic VEGF release, which leads to the inhibition of vessel formation [8] and increases endostatin concentrations in patients with RA [26]. Anti-TNF therapy also inhibits the Ang-1/Tie-2 system, but stimulates the expression of Ang-2 (angiopoietin 2, a pro-angiogenic factor) [13].

Angiogenesis is a very complex process, closely connected to inflammatory process mechanisms, which plays a significant role in the development of RA. It may be assumed that the search for substances that control angiogenesis may produce drugs helpful in treating patients with RA. This, however, requires a fuller understanding of the process of new vessel formation in patients, as well as the potential mechanisms of therapeutic action.

References

 1. Risan W, Flamme I. Vasculogenesis. Ann Rev Cell Dev Biol 1995; 11: 73091.  

2. Battegay EJ. Angiogenesis: mechanistis insights, neovascular diseases, the therapeutic prospects. J Mol Med 1995; 73: 333-346.  

3. Gavin TP, Robinsos CB, Yeager RC, et al. Angiogenic growth factor response to acute systemic exercise in human skeletal muscle. J Appl Physiol 2004; 96: 19-24.  

4. Carmeliet P, Jain RK. Angiogenesis in cancer and other diseases. Nature 2000; 407: 249-257.  

5. Folkman J. Angiogenesis in cancer, vascular, rheumatoid and other disease. Nature Med 1995; 1: 27-31.  

6. Salke FW, Simsosns M. Angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease. Current status and therapeutic potential. Drugs 1999; 58: 391-396.  

7. LeRoy EC. Systemic sclerosis. A vascular perspective. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 1996; 22: 675-694.  

8. Szekenacz Z, Koch A. Angiogenesis and its targeting in rheumatoid arthritis. Vascul Pharmacol. 2009; 51: 1-7.  

9. Olszewski E, Miodoński AJ. Badania nad unaczynieniem guzów – angiogeneza – zagadnienia nadal aktualne. Terapia 2000; 9: 20-22

10. Folkman J. Angiogenesis inhibitors: a new class of drugs. Cancer Biol Ther 2003; 2: 127-133.

11. Małdyk E. Reumatoidalne zapalenie stawów. W: Patomorfologia chorób tkanki łącznej. Małdyk E (red.). PZWL, Warszawa 1981; 144-168.

12. Szekenacz Z, Koch AE. Vascular involvement in rheumatic diseases: ‘vascular rheumatology’. Arthritis Res Ther 2008; 10: 224-233.

13. Maruotti N, Cantatore FP, Crivellato E, et al. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Histol Histopathol 2006; 21: 557-566.

14. Paavonen K, Mandelin J, Partanen T, et al. Vascular endothelial growth factors C and D and their VEGF-2 and 3 receptors in blood and lymphatic vessels in healthy and arthritic synovium. J Rheumatol 2002; 29: 39-45.

15. Ikeda M, Hosoda Y, Hirose S, et al. Expression of vescular endothelial growth factor isoforms and their receptors Flt-1, KDR, and neutrophilin-1 in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis. J Pathol 2000; 191: 426-433.

16. Giatromalonaki A, Sivridis E, Maltezos E, et al. Upregulated hypoxia inducible factor-1? and 2? pathway in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Arthritis Res Ther 2003; 5: R193-R201.

17. Paleolog EM, Fava RA. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis: implications for future therapeutic strategies. Springer Semin Immunopathol 1998; 20: 73.

18. Ballara SC, Taylor PC, Reusch P, et al. Raised serum vescular endothelial growth factor levels are associated with destructive change in inflammatory arthritis. Arthritis Rheum 2001; 44: 2055-2064.

19. Bodolay E, Koch AE, Kim J, et al. Angiogenesis and chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and other systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. J Cell Mol Med 2002; 6: 357-376.

20. Veale DJ, Fearon U. Inhibition of angiogenic pathways in rheumatoid arthritis: potential for therapeutic targeting. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2006; 20: 941-947.

21. Jacq L, Garnier S, Dieudé P. The ITGAV rs3738919-C allele is associated with rheumatoid arthritis in the European Caucasian population: a family-based study. Arthritis Res Ther 2007; 9: R63-R70.

22. Lainer-Carr D, Brahn E. Angiogenesis inhibition as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory synovitis. Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 2007; 3: 434-442.

23. Kotyla PJ, Śliwińska-Kotyla B, Kucharz EJ. Struktura, metabolizm, funkcja biologiczna i znaczenie kliniczne ensotelin. Post Hig Med Dośw 1993; 43: 345-364.

24. Kotulska A, Mazurek U, Kotyla U i wsp. Angiostatyna – naturalny inhibitor angiogenezy. Poradnik Farmaceutyczny 2006; 1(22): 1-4.

25. Kucharz EJ, Kotulska A. Patofizjologiczne rola endostatyny w chorobach nienowotworowych. Pol Arch Med Wewn 2006; 115: 507-511.

26. Kucharz EJ, Goździk J, Kopeć M, et al. A single infusion of infliximab increases the serum endostatin level in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exper Rheumatology 2003; 21: 273-274.
Nowe naczynia krwionośne mogą powstawać w procesie waskulogenezy lub angiogenezy.

Waskulogenezą nazywa się formowanie pierwotnych naczyń w okresie rozwoju zarodkowego. Pierwsze naczynia powstają z pochodzących z mezenchymy komórek prekursorowych, zwanych angioblastami, które różnicują się w tkance awaskularnej do komórek śródbłonka i rozrastają do pierwotnego splotu włośniczkowego. Utworzona w ten sposób sieć naczyniowa jest potrzebna do powstania wszystkich narządów w okresie embrionalnym. Układ krążenia rozwija się pierwszy.

Angiogeneza to proces tworzenia nowych naczyń krwionośnych, zachodzący głównie poza okresem rozwoju płodowego. Nowe naczynia powstają poprzez wzrost wypuszczanych pędów, rozgałęzienie i wgłobienie składowych istniejącego już systemu naczyniowego [1].

Od czasów Claudiusa Galena (129–199), który zauważył, że naczynia wypełniają się krwią, a nie powietrzem; sir Williama Harveya (1578–1657), który odkrył krążenie krwi; Johna Huntera (1728–1793), który po raz pierwszy użył terminu „angiogeneza” do opisania wzrostu naczyń krwionośnych w porożu renifera, poznano wiele mechanizmów kierujących rozwojem nowych naczyń zarówno w stanach fizjologicznych, jak i patologicznych. Właściwe zainteresowanie angiogenezą w medycynie datuje się od prac Judaha Folkmana z lat 80. ubiegłego wieku. Wykazał on, że ograniczenie procesu tworzenia nowych naczyń hamuje wzrost nowotworu.

Kluczową rolę w angiogenezie odgrywają komórki śródbłonka, które mają wiele funkcji fizjologicznych, a także uczestniczą w procesach zapalnych i decydują o przepuszczalności i przebudowie nowo tworzonych naczyń krwionośnych. Tworzenie naczyń w organizmie człowieka jest niezbędne dla jego prawidłowego wzrostu i funkcjonowania, szczególnie w procesach ciągłego odnawiania się tkanek, tak jak to zachodzi w błonie śluzowej macicy w cyklu miesiączkowym kobiet czy w procesie gojenia się ran [2], a także w mięśniach w odpowiedzi na wysiłek fizyczny [3]. W stanach patologicznych angiogeneza może być nasilona lub upośledzona, tj. zachodzi albo ze zwiększeniem, albo ze zmniejszeniem tworzenia się nowych naczyń. Do zwiększania się liczby, wielkości i długości naczyń krwionośnych dochodzi podczas tworzenia się litych lub hematologicznych guzów nowotworowych oraz przerzutów, guzów zapalnych, w reumatoidalnym zapaleniu stawów, łuszczycy, łuszczycowym zapaleniu stawów, w chorobie wrzodowej żołądka i dwunastnicy, wrzodziejącym zapaleniu jelita grubego, chorobie Leśniowskiego i Crohna, retinopatii cukrzycowej, zapaleniu siatkówki i rogówki [4, 5]. Niedostateczne tworzenie się naczyń krwionośnych w stanach patologicznych występuje zaś w twardzinie układowej, chorobie niedokrwiennej mięśnia sercowego, niedokrwieniu kończyn dolnych [6]. W twardzinie układowej gęstość naczyń włosowatych skóry jest zmniejszona o co najmniej 70% w porównaniu z grupą kontrolną ludzi zdrowych [7].

Niezależnie od swojej wielkości, naczynie krwionośne dostarcza przede wszystkim tlen i substancje odżywcze do unaczynionych tkanek. Angiogeneza może się rozpocząć bardzo szybko w odpowiedzi na niedotlenienie lub niedokrwienie narządu, jeśli zaistnieją warunki do zainicjowania tego procesu [8]. Musi zatem dojść do odróżnicowania komórek śródbłonka, zmniejszenia ich przylegania poprzez oderwanie połączeń międzykomórkowych i przez to zwiększenie przepuszczalności śródbłonka. Aby aktywowane komórki śródbłonka mogły penetrować nowe miejsca, konieczny jest rozkład błony podstawnej i aktywowanie czynników angiogenezy. Migrujące komórki śródbłonka muszą pozostawać w kontakcie z substancją pozakomórkową tkanki łącznej w procesie haptotaksji, a równocześnie uruchamiane są mechanizmy przeciwdziałające apoptozie komórek uwolnionych poza naczynie krwionośne. Szybkie namnażanie się komórek śródbłonka jest niezbędne do dalszego rozwoju pączkującego naczynia. Przemieszczające się w podścielisku komórki układają się szeregowo jedna za drugą, wydłużają się, a w obrębie pączkującego naczynia powstaje jego światło. Utworzone zostaje sprawne czynnościowo naczynie krwionośne. Dzięki połączeniom z innymi naczyniami i wytworzeniu systemu naczyń krwionośnych możliwy jest przepływ krwi.

W dalszym etapie powstaje trójwymiarowa struktura sieci naczyń rozgałęzionych. Interakcja pomiędzy komórkami śródbłonka i macierzą pozakomórkową jest niezbędna do stabilizacji sieci naczyniowej [9]. O ile w procesie wychodzenia komórek śródbłonka poza naczynie krwionośne w pierwszym etapie angiogenezy ważną funkcję pełnią enzymy proteolityczne, metaloproteazy, plazmina powstała z plazminogenu i inne aktywne biologicznie cząsteczki degradacji macierzy pozakomórkowej, o tyle przy stabilizowaniu nowo powstałego naczynia istotną rolę odgrywają cząsteczki przylegania komórkowego, płytkowy czynnik wzrostu, angiopoetyny, a także – w różnym stopniu – komórki mięśni gładkich. W warunkach fizjologicznych istotne jest utrzymanie procesu angiogenezy, co wymaga równoczesnego, prawidłowego przebiegu wszystkich jej etapów oraz utrzymania równowagi pomiędzy czynnikami pobudzającymi i hamującymi ten proces.

Angiogeneza w warunkach patologicznych jest niezbędna do wzrostu tkanki, która rozwija się w przebiegu procesu chorobowego, np. guza nowotworowego czy zapalnego. Niefizjologicznemu wzrostowi tkanki towarzyszy przewaga tworzenia nowych naczyń, co wskazuje na zachwianie równowagi pomiędzy czynnikami pobudzającymi i hamującymi angiogenezę. Najlepiej poznany jest proces angiogenezy w onkologii, chociaż wciąż za mało wiadomo o czynnikach, które stymulują proangiogenne procesy prowadzące do intensywnego tworzenia i wzrostu nowych naczyń, umożliwiającego odżywianie komórek szybko narastającej masy nowotworu. Badania nad angiogenezą w onkologii koncentrują się na potencjalnej terapii nowotworów [10].

O wiele mniej wiadomo o udziale angiogenezy w chorobach nienowotworowych. Z uwagi na silne powiązania regulacji angiogenezy z takimi czynnikami, jak mediatory procesu odpornościowego i czynniki regulujące proces zapalny, wydaje się, że badanie regulacji angiogenezy w chorobach nienowotworowych może także dać wgląd w ich patogenezę.

Zapalenie jest zespołem reakcji organizmu, będących jego odpowiedzią na działanie różnych czynników uszkadzających, mających na celu ograniczenie, izolowanie i eliminację czynnika szkodliwego oraz umożliwienie procesu naprawczego. Zapalenie łączy się z mnożeniem, migracją i aktywacją komórek obecnych w tkankach i napływających z innych miejsc, które mogą być wyjątkowo uszkadzające dla prawidłowej tkanki.

Zapalenie jest istotną składową patogenezy reumatoidalnego zapalenia stawów (RZS). Ma ono niespecyficzny charakter i dotyczy przede wszystkim błony maziowej, prowadząc do ciężkich uszkodzeń stawów. W przebiegu przewlekłego RZS błona maziowa bardzo grubieje, tworzy liczne fałdy kosmkowe wpuklające się do jamy stawowej. Zwiększa się liczba komórek synowialnych typu A, podobnych do makrofagów, i typu B, podobnych do fibroblastów. Pojawiają się liczne nacieki komórek jednojądrowych, w tym komórek T i B, makrofagów i komórek plazmatycznych. Rozrastająca się błona maziowa pokrywa całą powierzchnię stawu i wytwarza się łuszczka, początkowo mocno unaczyniona i zmieniona zapalnie. Dochodzi do niszczenia chrząstki i wytworzenia nadżerek kostnych [11]. Rozrost błony maziowej wskazuje na to, że w stawach dochodzi do intensywnej angiogenezy. Przerost tkanki wyścielającej stawy prowadzi do jej niedotlenienia i niedokrwienia, a czynniki te dodatkowo pobudzają proces tworzenia licznych kapilar. Nowo powstała sieć naczyń dostarcza z krwią tlen i składniki odżywcze oraz wydzielane nie tylko miejscowo cytokiny i czynniki wzrostowe, które wpływają zarówno na podtrzymanie procesu zapalnego, jak i angiogenezy. Można przypuszczać, że nawet niewielkie wydłużenie naczynia włosowatego umożliwia wzrost bardzo licznych komórek.

Angiogeneza stanowi istotną składową patogenezy zmian zachodzących w stawie w przebiegu RZS [12]. Przebieg tworzenia nowych naczyń jest regulowany przez wiele substancji, ale dokładny mechanizm ich działania nie jest znany, ponieważ większość badań przeprowadzono w izolowanych komórkach badanych in vitro lub w hodowli tkankowej.

Obserwacje dotyczące czynników regulujących angiogenezę w RZS można podzielić na:

• zjawiska wskazujące na intensywną angiogenezę (czynniki angiogenne w błonie maziowej, w płynie stawowym lub w surowicy),

• związek angiogenezy z zapaleniem stawów,

• kontrolowaną regulacją angiogenezy (np. za pomocą leków modyfikujących przebieg choroby).

Poznano wiele działających bezpośrednio i pośrednio czynników pro- i antyangiogennych, które nie są jednak swoiste tylko dla tego procesu, ale wykazują też wiele innych funkcji. Do głównych grup mediatorów angiogenezy należą: czynniki wzrostu, cytokiny prozapalne, chemokiny, składowe macierzy pozakomórkowej, cząsteczki przylegania komórkowego, proteazy, czynniki środowiskowe, inhibitory apoptozy i inne. Znaczna część tych czynników bierze udział w rozwoju zapalenia, co szczególnie dotyczy cytokin. Spośród czynników hamujących angiogenezę wyodrębniono czynniki endogenne, egzogenne oraz inhibitory wymienionych powyżej niektórych czynników proangiogennych (tab. I) [8]. Ciekawym zjawiskiem jest to, że znaczna część czynników angiostatycznych to fragmenty dużych białek, pełniących inne funkcje, np. angiostatyna i endostatyna.

W licznych badaniach z udziałem chorych na RZS wykazano zmienione stężenia wszystkich głównych czynników angiogennych w tkankach stawu, w płynie stawowym, a często również w surowicy. Potwierdzono także wzajemne korelacje pomiędzy stężeniem niektórych z tych czynników a cytokinami wywołującymi zapalenie. Uważa się, że w wyniku niedotlenienia wewnątrzstawowo pojawia się początkowo czynnik indukowany przez niedotlenienie (hypoxia inducible factor – HIF), którego wzmożoną ekspresję wykazują synowiocyty i limfocyty T wyodrębnione z nacieków błony maziowej [13]. Pod jego wpływem są uwalniane czynniki proangiogenne, z których głównymi i najlepiej dotąd poznanymi są białka z rodziny czynnika wzrostu śródbłonka naczyniowego (vascular endothelial growth factor – VEGF). Są one jednymi z najsilniej działających czynników stymulujących i podtrzymujących proces powstawania naczyń w nowo tworzącej się tkance. Powodują zwiększenie przepuszczalności naczyń, migrację i proliferację komórek śródbłonka. Na zwiększenie i nagromadzenie tego czynnika mają także wpływ komórki jednojądrowe, które uwalniają VEGF w odpowiedzi na cytokiny prozapalne. Szczególnie jedno z białek, tj. VEGF-C, jest indukowane przez TNF- i interleukinę 1, a nie przez niedotlenienie. Zwiększoną ekspresję VEGF-C obserwuje się w błonie maziowej stawu objętego procesem reumatoidalnego zapalenia, w pericytach i mięśniach gładkich naczyń [14]. Podobnie zwiększonej ekspresji izoformy VEGF165 towarzyszy zwiększona gęstość naczyń włosowatych w reumatoidalnej błonie maziowej [15]. Liczba mikronaczyń oszacowana przy użyciu przeciwciał monoklonalnych dla kompleksu VEGF i receptora (VEGF/VEGFR) jest wyraźnie większa w tkankach osób chorych na RZS niż na chorobę zwyrodnieniową lub u których błona maziowa nie jest zmieniona [16]. Poza zmianami miejscowymi ilość VEGF zwiększa się w całym organizmie, a jego stężenie w surowicy koreluje zarówno ze stężeniem białka C-reaktywnego [17], jak i ze zmianami radiologicznymi rąk i stóp, pojawiającymi się w ciągu pierwszego roku choroby, a zatem w okresie najbardziej intensywnej angiogenezy [18].

Działania proangiogenne wykazano dla wielu czynników uczestniczących w procesie zapalnym. Należą do nich interleukiny (interleukiny 1, 6, 8 i 18) oraz TNF-, a także chemokiny mające w swej strukturze motyw ELR (sekwencję glutamylowo-leucynylowo-arginylową). Uczestniczą one w indukcji napływu komórek zapalnych i promują angiogenezę w błonie maziowej stawów. Chemokiny CXC, które pozbawione są ELR, hamują rozwój nowych naczyń [19].

Czynnik martwicy nowotworów  reguluje angiogenezę poprzez inny czynnik proangiogenny – angiopoetynę 1 (Ang1) w połączeniu ze śródbłonkowym receptorem kinazy tyrozyny Tie2 (endothelial tyrosine kinase receptor) [20]. Układ ten stabilizuje nowo powstałe naczynie [8]. Inna prozapalna cytokina, interleukina 18, stymuluje produkcję przez fibroblasty błony maziowej białek VEGF oraz SDF-1/CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1/chemokine ligand 12), kolejnego proangiogennego kompleksu.

Integryny są to glikoproteiny zaliczane do białek adhezyjnych. Są zbudowane z dwóch podjednostek  i . Spośród cząsteczek biorących udział w adhezji do komórek śródbłonka najlepiej poznana jest integryna v3. Jest ona mediatorem angiogenezy w zmienionej chorobowo błonie maziowej, a także w procesie resorpcji kości u chorych na RZS [8]. Wykazano, że podjednostkę v tej integryny koduje gen ITGAV. Allel genu ITGA- -Vrs3738919-C łączy się ze zwiększoną podatnością na zachorowanie na RZS w populacji kaukaskiej w Europie [21]. Z kolei badania na modelu zwierzęcym zapalenia stawów wykazały, że przeciwciało przeciwko integrynie v3 hamuje angiogenezę w błonie maziowej [22], ale wyniki badań klinicznych fazy II u ludzi nie są jednoznaczne.

Endotelina 1 jest peptydem o działaniu zwężającym naczynia. Wydzielana jest przez komórki śródbłonka naczyń krwionośnych, a jej rola fizjologiczna polega na utrzymywaniu właściwego napięcia naczyń i perfuzji naczyniowej [23]. Znacznie zwiększone stężenie endoteliny 1 obserwuje się w płynie stawowym i w surowicy chorych na RZS. Jest ona ważnym mediatorem indukującym produkcję VEGF, wpływa zatem pośrednio pobudzająco na angiogenezę wewnątrzstawową.

W stawie, w którego intensywnie rozrastających się tkankach dochodzi do nasilonej angiogenezy, czynniki endogenne hamujące ten proces występują w niewystarczającej ilości. Dwa spośród nich – angiostatyna (fragment plazminogenu) [24] i endostatyna (fragment kolagenu XVIII) [25] działają poprzez mechanizm zależny od integryny v3 [20]. Angiostatyna, wiążąc się z integryną v3, zaburza przekazywanie sygnału niezbędnego dla rozwoju angiogenezy, zachodzącego za pośrednictwem integryny v3. Co więcej, angiostatyna hamuje reakcje komórek śródbłonka i mięśni gładkich na czynnik wzrostu hepatocytów (hepatocyte growth factor – HGF) poprzez działanie na zasadzie konkurencyjnego antagonisty, natomiast nie wpływa na pobudzenie zachodzące w wyniku działania VEGF i zasadowego czynnika wzrostu fibroblastów (basic fibroblast growth factor – bFGF). Endostatyna także hamuje proliferację błony maziowej i destrukcję stawów [22].

Złożona regulacja angiogenezy sugeruje możliwość kontroli farmakologicznej tego procesu. Większość prac dotyczy właściwości angiostatycznych substancji o po­tencjalnym działaniu przeciwnowotworowym. Pojedyncze obserwacje poświęcono lekom stosowanych u chorych na RZS. Infliksymab z metotreksatem hamują wewnątrzstawowe i ogólnoustrojowe uwalnianie VEGF, co powoduje hamowanie powstawania naczyń [8] oraz zwiększa stężenie endostatyny u chorych na RZS [26]. Terapia anty-TNF redukuje także układ Ang1-Tie2, ale stymuluje ekspresję Ang2 (angiopoetyny 2, czynnika proangiogennego) [13].

Angiogeneza jest bardzo złożonym procesem ściśle zwiazanym z me­chanizmami procesu zapalnego, który odgrywa istotną rolę w rozwoju RZS. Można przypuszczać, że poszukiwanie substancji kontrolujących angiogenezę może dostarczyć leków przydatnych w terapii chorych na RZS. Wymaga to jednak pełniejszego poznania tworzenia nowych naczyń u chorych, jako potencjalnego celu oddziaływania terapeutycznego.

Piśmiennictwo





1. Risan W, Flamme I. Vasculogenesis. Ann Rev Cell Dev Biol 1995; 11: 73091.  

2. Battegay EJ. Angiogenesis: mechanistis insights, neovascular diseases, the therapeutic prospects. J Mol Med 1995; 73: 333-346.  

3. Gavin TP, Robinsos CB, Yeager RC, et al. Angiogenic growth factor response to acute systemic exercise in human skeletal muscle. J Appl Physiol 2004; 96: 19-24.  

4. Carmeliet P, Jain RK. Angiogenesis in cancer and other diseases. Nature 2000; 407: 249-257.  

5. Folkman J. Angiogenesis in cancer, vascular, rheumatoid and other disease. Nature Med 1995; 1: 27-31.  

6. Salke FW, Simsosns M. Angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease. Current status and therapeutic potential. Drugs 1999; 58: 391-396.  

7. LeRoy EC. Systemic sclerosis. A vascular perspective. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 1996; 22: 675-694.  

8. Szekenacz Z, Koch A. Angiogenesis and its targeting in rheumatoid arthritis. Vascul Pharmacol. 2009; 51: 1-7.  

9. Olszewski E, Miodoński AJ. Badania nad unaczynieniem guzów – angiogeneza – zagadnienia nadal aktualne. Terapia 2000; 9: 20-22

10. Folkman J. Angiogenesis inhibitors: a new class of drugs. Cancer Biol Ther 2003; 2: 127-133.

11. Małdyk E. Reumatoidalne zapalenie stawów. W: Patomorfologia chorób tkanki łącznej. Małdyk E (red.). PZWL, Warszawa 1981; 144-168.

12. Szekenacz Z, Koch AE. Vascular involvement in rheumatic diseases: ‘vascular rheumatology’. Arthritis Res Ther 2008; 10: 224-233.

13. Maruotti N, Cantatore FP, Crivellato E, et al. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Histol Histopathol 2006; 21: 557-566.

14. Paavonen K, Mandelin J, Partanen T, et al. Vascular endothelial growth factors C and D and their VEGF-2 and 3 receptors in blood and lymphatic vessels in healthy and arthritic synovium. J Rheumatol 2002; 29: 39-45.

15. Ikeda M, Hosoda Y, Hirose S, et al. Expression of vescular endothelial growth factor isoforms and their receptors Flt-1, KDR, and neutrophilin-1 in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis. J Pathol 2000; 191: 426-433.

16. Giatromalonaki A, Sivridis E, Maltezos E, et al. Upregulated hypoxia inducible factor-1? and 2? pathway in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Arthritis Res Ther 2003; 5: R193-R201.

17. Paleolog EM, Fava RA. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis: implications for future therapeutic strategies. Springer Semin Immunopathol 1998; 20: 73.

18. Ballara SC, Taylor PC, Reusch P, et al. Raised serum vescular endothelial growth factor levels are associated with destructive change in inflammatory arthritis. Arthritis Rheum 2001; 44: 2055-2064.

19. Bodolay E, Koch AE, Kim J, et al. Angiogenesis and chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and other systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. J Cell Mol Med 2002; 6: 357-376.

20. Veale DJ, Fearon U. Inhibition of angiogenic pathways in rheumatoid arthritis: potential for therapeutic targeting. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2006; 20: 941-947.

21. Jacq L, Garnier S, Dieudé P. The ITGAV rs3738919-C allele is associated with rheumatoid arthritis in the European Caucasian population: a family-based study. Arthritis Res Ther 2007; 9: R63-R70.

22. Lainer-Carr D, Brahn E. Angiogenesis inhibition as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory synovitis. Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol 2007; 3: 434-442.

23. Kotyla PJ, Śliwińska-Kotyla B, Kucharz EJ. Struktura, metabolizm, funkcja biologiczna i znaczenie kliniczne ensotelin. Post Hig Med Dośw 1993; 43: 345-364.

24. Kotulska A, Mazurek U, Kotyla U i wsp. Angiostatyna – naturalny inhibitor angiogenezy. Poradnik Farmaceutyczny 2006; 1(22): 1-4.

25. Kucharz EJ, Kotulska A. Patofizjologiczne rola endostatyny w chorobach nienowotworowych. Pol Arch Med Wewn 2006; 115: 507-511.

26. Kucharz EJ, Goździk J, Kopeć M, et al. A single infusion of infliximab increases the serum endostatin level in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Exper Rheumatology 2003; 21: 273-274.
Copyright: © 2011 Narodowy Instytut Geriatrii, Reumatologii i Rehabilitacji w Warszawie. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.







facebook linkedin twitter
© 2021 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe