eISSN: 2300 - 8660
ISSN: 0031-3939
Pediatria Polska - Polish Journal of Paediatrics
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5/2019
vol. 94
 
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Artykuł oryginalny

The level of primitive reflex integration in children who play a musical instrument

Ewa Gieysztor
1
,
Anna M. Choińska
1
,
Mateusz Kowal
1
,
Anna Pecuch
1
,
Wojciech Borowicz
2
,
Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz
1

1.
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
2.
Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
Data publikacji online: 2019/11/19
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Introduction
Primitive reflex integration (PRI) is a natural process, which indicates maturity progress in the central nervous system (CNS) in toddlers. Somehow, we observe that some children even in school-age have persistent primitive reflexes.

Aim of the study
To establish if there is a difference in the PRI in musically vs. generally educated children.

Material and methods
The data were collected from 45 healthy children aged six to seven years. A group of child musicians (22 students) was examined and compared to a group of non-musicians (23 students). Each child in the examined groups was assessed individually by primitive reflex tests. Asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR), symmetrical tonic neck reflex (STNR), and tonic labyrinthine reflex (TLR) were evaluated.

Results
Based on the results of the studied children, children musically educated had a significantly better level of PRI than the control group (p < 0.03). There was no one with grade 3 and 4 disintegration in the group of child musicians, and nearly 20% of them showed full PRI, as opposed to non-musicians among whom there was no one with full PRI. The most frequently occurring reflex was the ATNR L (83% of non-musician children and 55% of musician children), and the least frequently performed was TLR FLX – 8% of non-musician children.

Conclusions
Musical training can be a stimulus influencing PRI. Musical training may influence the maturation of the CNS measured by PRI. Musical training may be part of the reflex integration therapy in children.