eISSN: 1689-3530
ISSN: 0867-4361
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction/Alkoholizm i Narkomania
Bieżący numer Archiwum Artykuły zaakceptowane O czasopiśmie Rada naukowa Bazy indeksacyjne Prenumerata Kontakt Zasady publikacji prac Standardy etyczne i procedury
1/2020
vol. 33
 
Poleć ten artykuł:
Udostępnij:
więcej
 
 
Artykuł oryginalny

Aplikacje mobilne przeznaczone dla osób uzależnionych od alkoholu jako narzędzia wspierające proces zdrowienia

Justyna Iwona Klingemann
1
,
Michał Wróblewski
2
,
Łukasz Wieczorek
1

1.
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Studies on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Warsaw, Poland
2.
Institute of Sociology, Faculty of Humanities, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland
Data publikacji online: 2020/06/09
Plik artykułu:
- AIN-Klingermann.pdf  [0.47 MB]
Pobierz cytowanie
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

The growing interest in mobile applications in the area of problematic psychoactive substance use reflects a wider paradigm shift in healthcare. Changes in the social definition of mental health and the emerging new needs and patient expectations result in a growing focus on an individual increasingly actively and consciously monitoring his or her own health indicators. The mHealth concept refers to all activities using the potential of mobile software (phones and smartphones and mobile health applications) in the sphere of health and healthcare. Summarising changes in this area, Swan [1] writes about 80% of internet users looking for health information online, about 7000 health applications downloaded more than 5 billion times in 2010 and about the new concept the quantified self. Research indicates that mobile applications are a widely accepted and useful medium of health interventions [2]. On the other hand, the use of new technologies is not evenly distributed in different parts of the world and in different groups of potential users. In Poland almost every third internet user (31%) took advantage of mobile health and sports applications [3] in 2015. In the Fox and Duggan study [4], only 19% of smartphone users downloaded a health application, of which only 10% in the over 65-year-old group.

In the area of problematic psychoactive substance use, applications monitoring alcohol consumption and making use of the short intervention concept serve to strengthen risk awareness and change behaviour in the general population. In addition, there are applications that maintain contact with ex-patients for addiction treatment, or applications that are oriented towards relapse prevention and even those that borrow assisted self-medication concepts from addiction [5-9]. Interventions of this kind seem to be particularly valuable in relation to alcohol dependence as the rate of post-therapy relapse is high and the process of recovering from alcohol dependence requires time and various sources of support in the consolidation phase. Researchers note that while alcohol dependence is commonly treated as a chronic disease, treatment rarely offers any form of long-term support and prevention of relapse in patients who have completed treatment – at least not as much support as is available to those suffering from other chronic disorders [10, 11]. The use of the application in a therapeutic context may mean help in the estimation of the symptoms of dependence, provision of information on psycho-education and strengthening of commitment, motivation and retention time in treatment [12]. Applications can potentially contain a whole range of functionalities to meet different user needs, but in practice, it appears that the popularity of individual solutions varies greatly. In the Ramsey review [13], the main way of supporting the process of coping with problematic alcohol use was to provide general information on the risks associated with drinking, the types of treatment available and knowledge about dependence (37%). This information was usually e-books without interactive elements. The applications also provided messages motivating for change and anecdotes from the lives of those who successfully managed to cope with drinking (21%). Some of the analysed applications offered tools for monitoring days of abstinence (24%) or the level of consumption (the amount of alcohol drunk during the last month 22%). Some offered assistance in the state of intoxication, e.g. by questionnaires estimating the level of intoxication or encouraging the drinking of water between alcohol beverages use (28% of the applications); assistance to prevent driving under the influence of alcohol (22% of the applications enabled a call to a friend or a taxi); avoiding social problems (3% blocking social media and communicators) [13].

The research by Savic et al. [14] shows that the most common functionality among all the applications (n = 87) is providing information on addiction and cure (69%). Nearly half of the surveyed applications aimed at strengthening the motivation to change (49%) through meditations and prayers (30%), stories of those who succeeded (22%) and lists of undertaken actions (15%). Only 38% of the applications strengthened bonds, developed the possibility of giving or receiving support by such functionalities as locators of self-help groups and therapeutic institutions (23%), links to online communities (21%) and quick access to the list of personal contacts (11%). Also, 28% of the application contained interactive functionalities mainly in the form of diagrams and sobriety days counters and only 2% as reward functionalities. More than 3/4 of applications (82%) are based mainly on text, other media are much less frequently used: audio 18%, maps 10%, graphics 8% and video 7%. Also game elements were rare, taking the form of awarding points or gaining levels, although these seem to be potential sources of reward and positive reinforcement. It is also important that applications require constant care, improvement and their creators should pay attention to information from users [14]. It seems that mHealth solutions may become the answer to the gap in the treatment offer, providing an opportunity of maintaining long-term contact with the treatment facility and overcoming barriers related to stigma, geographical exclusion and high costs of treatment. Thanks to technological solutions of this kind, patients feel a stronger connection with the treatment facility, have the feeling that their disease is carefully monitored and they have not been forgotten by their therapist [9-11]. An important element is the feeling of being in contact with others and the possibility of obtaining social support also through involvement in self-help groups [15]. High availability of therapeutic assistance in crisis situations is very important here. However, issues related to privacy and confidentiality may be a challenge. There are many potential problems like disclosure of the data entered into the application to unauthorized persons by digital theft or loss of phone, inadequate protection of the data within the application and users lack of awareness of what type of information the application creators have access to [9, 11]. The extraordinary dynamics of the development of new technologies is also a challenge as many new solutions are constantly appearing that are difficult for laymen to keep up with, hence the need for research analysing currently available applications in terms of their possibilities.

The review of the publically available mobile applications for alcohol dependent persons, presented in this article aimed to assess their potential as tools supporting the alcohol dependence therapy process. A number of different applications were selected and analysed for their content, attractiveness, quality, scope of impact, type of available functionalities and concern for protecting users’ privacy. <3>Material and methods Sources in the application search were Google Play and AppStore databases; in the former, applications run on Android and in the latter on iOS system. The following keywords were used: drinking, drink, alcohol, sobriety, alcoholism and alcohol addiction. Data was collected from September to December 2018, and the last update of the database took place on 13.12.2018.

The next stage of the search consisted of analysing the applications on the basis of descriptions of application functionalities available in Google Play and AppStore databases as well as information about the price and number of downloads. This process is described in detail in another article [16]. Based on the descriptions, the following were excluded from in-depth analysis: 1) paid applications, 2) applications with zero downloads and so-called unpublished applications intended for testers, 3) applications that in various forms encourage the drinking of alcohol, e.g. by facilitating access or supporting the process of consumption, 4) applications discouraging the use of alcohol, but to a very limited extent with one or two simple functionalities. The applications which, in the opinion of researchers, had the greatest potential to support the therapeutic process were included in the in-depth analysis, as these contained a number of different functionalities and involved the user to a greater extent than others (n = 16). One of the 16 selected applications was excluded due to a start-up problem (Figure 1).

Finally, 15 applications were further evaluated using modified versions of the Self-Help Model Scale (SHMS) [17] and Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [18]. Eight were available in both databases, six only in Google Play and one only in AppStore.

The Self-Help Model Scale (SHMS) [17] determines the extent to which the application supports the user in coping with alcohol problems by scoring individual functionalities. The SHMS modification assigned individual scale items to four thematic categories: 1) educational and motivational level, 2) identifying high-risk situations, 3) strategies of coping in high-risk situations and 4) relapse prevention level. In addition, in the thematic area “strategies of coping in high-risk situations”, the scale score was modified from 0-2 points to 0-1 points (Table I).

The Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [18] is a scale that evaluates different types of health applications. It consists of 1) a part concerning the general characteristics of the application and its functionality; 2) parts assessing a) engagement, b) functionality, c) aesthetics and d) information; 3) a part allowing for subjective evaluation of the attractiveness of the application and 4) a part allowing for the assessment of compliance of the application with specific objectives related to the change of health attitudes and behaviours. In the mWsparcie project, the testers in the fourth part evaluated the applications in terms of developing awareness of one’s own problem; increasing the level of knowledge; increasing the sense of self-efficacy and motivation to change; increasing the chances of seeking therapeutic help, changing addictive behaviour and seeking various forms of social support and reducing the chances of relapse. The scale has also been modified in part assessing the scope of information (2d). The answers not applicable were treated as 0 and, contrary to the recommendations of the scale creators, were included in the overall average. In our view, responses like “application not included information” or “it has no scientific justification” are not neutral and should lower the final rating.

The evaluation was conducted over a two-week period using phones equipped with Android and iOS operating systems. The applications were tested by three people: the first tester evaluated all 15 applications, the second and the third tested eight applications each. One of the applications – Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż (I don’t drink, I don’t take, Guardian Angel) was tested by three testers. Their grades were averaged out (Table II).

Results

The initial application selection was based on their description in Google Play and Apple Store databases. An in-depth analysis of application content was possible only after downloading. Two independent testers each underwent several days of testing. The results show that the analysed applications differed significantly in their functionality number and complexity. Below we present the results of the analysis of quantitative indicators available for the evaluated applications and their detailed characteristics (starting from the most popular), analysed in terms of their functionalities supporting the process of dealing with dependence. Below we present the results of application content evaluation using SHMS and MARS scales.

Indicators of influence
Several indicators are available in the Google Play database, such as the number of user reviews or the average users score, which illustrate both the popularity of a given application and its scope of impact. A large number of reviews showed that a given application aroused interest and users were willing to share their opinions about it. Another available indicator is the number of application downloads, though the Google Play database only provides the ranges of downloads not the exact number. Data on the analysed applications are presented in Table III.

Five of the analysed applications can be characterised as applications with a relatively high impact range with downloads exceeding 100,000. Another five are applications with a moderate impact range of downloads from 10,000 to 50,000. Among the most frequently evaluated applications were Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock (13,972 reviews) and Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking/Easy Quit (9301 reviews), the latter was also rated the highest (average 4.9). Another highly rated application was I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety (mean score 4.8).

Characteristics of analysed applications
Most effective applications
Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) is an application that allows you to monitor days of sobriety and changes in mood and state of health. The user can obtain personalised information on the impact of alcohol on his or her health. The application shows in how many days of non-drinking the nerve cells start to regenerate or when withdrawal symptoms appear. The user has access to a set of tips and motivational phrases supporting sobriety, and he or she may also create their own. In addition, the application includes a memory game, which aims to distract from the thinking about alcohol. Sobriety Counter also allows the creation of a slow mode (gradual recovery) programme. Another advantage is a clear application user manual. I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety is also primarily a tracker, which allows users to monitor both the consumption of alcohol and other substances. The motivation to be sober may be defined (“I want to be sober because...” then serving as a motivating reminder). Every evening, the application “asks” about the success in maintaining sobriety and the degree of difficulty in achieving it as well as the activities of the day. This allows the user to monitor not only the number of risky situation days, but the circumstances in which they occurred. I Am Sober also asks about noticeable changes in health, behaviour and well-being after reaching a milestone (e.g. the month of sobriety), while providing information on the percentage of users who responded similarly. The application also offers the possibility to use the services of a (private) therapist online and, after entering a postal code, informs about the nearest therapeutic facilities.

Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock has a built-in communicator and allows for quick contact with the supporting person: “sponsor”. It creates charts on the basis of collected data (number of days, amount of money saved). It also allows recording of the moment when the sobriety period was interrupted and making a brief description (note). Moreover the user is able not only to achieve the goals defined in the application (e.g. stay sober for a month) but also to define his or her own.

Sobriety Clock is an example of a tracker that refers to the AA 12-Step philosophy though here users can select the type of addiction (drugs and/or alcohol). In addition to monitoring sobriety, the application provides access to motivational quotes and makes possible quick contact with the supporter person: “sponsor”. AA 12 Step App – Steps Toolbox is an application that supports therapy using 12-Step method. In addition to the traditional sobriety tracker, it contains information about the Alcoholics Anonymous movement and the functionalities associated with the particular steps (e.g. doing a conscience check or evening meditation). An advantage of this application is the intuitive operation of individual pages.

Averagely effective applications
A similar application is AA App – 12 Steps Toolkit – Alcoholics Anonymous, which offers sober day tracking and keeping a diary of feelings. Its advantage is a neutral icon (thus protecting the user’s privacy) and the name of the application displayed following download (My Toolkit).

Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help contains mainly information provided in the form of questions and answers on a “decision tree” basis. For example, the user selects “I’m thinking about returning to the habit” and then “I feel like a drink now”, and the screen displays user-sobriety motivational stories. Users can search for, create and evaluate the messages themselves. In addition, the app includes tracking functionalities, gives you the opportunity to contact your sponsor (supporter person), talk on the forum and, thanks to geolocation, indicate the locations of upcoming self-help groups meetings.

Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż (I don’t drink, I don’t take, Guardian Angel) is a Polish language application. The user marks not only the moments of drinking and non-drinking, but also the moments of alcohol cravings. If a large number of days is marked craving or drinking, the application prompts to contact Centrum Pomocy Anioł Stróż (the Guardian Angel Help Centre, private unit, the application provides a phone number). The application has its own built-in forum where registration is separate to application downloading. Moreover you will find there a short description of the AA 12 Steps philosophy and the HALT programme (hungry, angry, lonely, tired). Not only are the risk factors associated with the four emotional states described, but also what to do in crisis situations, e.g. “Drink tea, a glass of mineral water, juice or milk, the specialists also recommend something sweet. Then the demand for alcohol weakens significantly”. The application has a cyclical reminder function for the HALT programme and for filling in the calendar (a specific time to do this may be set). It also allows the creation of a support network by adding names and telephone numbers of persons with whom we would like to be in close contact. Additionally, the application contains audio content (relaxing music, poems, podcasts). Nomo – Sobriety Clocks is an example of an application that can help in emergency situations. It contains a refocus option, which encourages the user’s attention from thoughts about alcohol (games based on memory or reflection). There are also motivational messages for coping with addiction created by application users. Everyone can write their own or like other users’ messages. In nomo, similarly to iRecovery discussed below, we create our own support group by adding friends or family members to whom the application sends messages in a crisis (SOS function). Moreover, the application can suggest someone from among other users with a similar profile. Another advantage is the name and logo not associated with addiction. The Dry January and Beyond/Dry Days application contains primarily a number of tracking functionalities. The user receives information not only about the number of sober days, but also about the amount of money saved or unused calories. In the application there is a calendar for entering alcoholic episodes together with an evaluation of feelings and sleep quality. The application helps to estimate of blood alcohol content and compares drinking days and sobriety.

Low-effect applications
Another Polish application that is based on AA 12 Steps philosophy is Alky Recovery. The application has tracking functionalities, allowing initial diagnosis of habits (in the form of the Warning Signs Test) and a diary record of alcohol cravings (asks about various symptoms, like intrusive thoughts about alcohol, allows periodic analyses of when and under what circumstances cravings most often occurred). The application also allows direct contact with the therapist and contains a database of addiction treatment centres using GPS locators. Alky Recovery contains a social component. The main screen of the application is a desktop similar to Facebook, where various types of content concerning alcohol problems appear, which users can comment on and like. The application also builds a community of users and has its own built-in communicator. The iRecovery application allows creation of a recovery plan by defining three types of dangerous, moderately safe and safe behaviour marked in red, yellow and green. There is a specific social component here as the user creates a circle of support, i.e. a list of people who can be called or written to with the application. In iRecovery, we receive points not only for the next sober days, but also for specific behaviour. The latter are divided into several categories (e.g. “spiritual” or “psychological”) and there are elements like “support group meeting” or “physical exercises”. The application also allows users to define the activity themselves and assign the appropriate number of points.

Quit for Health Lite and Recovery Elevator Sobriets are trackers with two additional community and informational functions. Both allow participation on a social forum (Quit for Health Lite works similar to Facebook) and offers information about addiction (in Recovery Elevator, it is a database of two hundred podcasts). Both applications allow photos and descriptions reminding of the reasons for stopping drinking. In Quit for Health Lite, alcohol is one of the substances that users can try to reduce along with nicotine, sugar and unhealthy food. The application also shows a ranking of sober days; with each alcohol drinking episode, the user is informed how long he or she has remained sober this time and can see his or her longest periods of sobriety. There is also short and understandable information about the damage caused by alcohol. Sober Tree is primarily used to monitor alcohol consumption. The application asks the user about drinking on a daily basis and allows the writing of a periodic report. It also includes a social component (built-in chat). SHMS (Self-Help Model Scale) evaluation

The tested applications achieved relatively low scores on the SHMS, which ranges from 0 to 18 points. The highest scored application gained 7.7 points and the lowest only one. The average score was 4. Figure 2 presents the result for application evaluation in particular areas for I – educational and motivational level; II – identifying high-risk situations; III – strategies of coping in high-risk situations; IV – relapse prevention level. Most applications received points for educational and motivational level, which means that their main purpose was to provide knowledge about alcohol dependence, information about one’s own health and motivate to stay sober. Points in the relapse prevention category were mainly due to the automated reward system (in the form of badges, points, milestones or medals). The functionalities related to crisis management strategies were least represented with only two applications receiving points in this area. The four best-rated applications on the SHMS are: Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż (7.7 points), Alky Recovery (6.5 points), nomo – Sobriety Clocks (6.0 points), Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help (6.9 points). These applications scored in all four areas. It is worth noting here that none is counted a high-impact application.

Two applications from the highest impact range group obtained a relatively high score on the SHMS: I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety (average user ratings 4.8; SHMS score 5.5) and Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) (average user ratings 4.9; SHMS score 5.5). Among the applications with the highest impact range were also two rated very low on the SHMS: Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock (average user ratings 4.7; SHMS score 1.5) and Sobriety Clock (average user ratings 4.3; SHMS score 1.5).

MARS (Mobile Application Rating Scale) evaluation
The most engaging application turned out to be Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit), which is also the best rated application from our overall sample (average 4.9). It was one of the most frequently rated (9301) and most frequently downloaded (over 100,000). Such a high rating in this category can be explained by the fact that it contains a playable module (in the form of a memory game) and shows how non-drinking positively affects various health parameters (Figure 3).

The applications with the best functionality are Alky Recovery and Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help, while Sober Time, which stands out from others in terms of layout, received the best rating in the aesthetic category. Alky Recovery was the best in the category related to information. The application provides information in the form of links to various types of content, which, like on Facebook, can be liked or commented. Alky Recovery also scored best on average overall quality and in the subjective evaluation indicator (Figure 4).

Considering the compatibility of individual applications against the goal of dependence therapy support, the four highest scores were for Sober Tool, Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż, Alky Recovery and nomo. All combine many functionalities from the tracker, through the social component, to functions aimed directly at coping with relapse or alcohol craving. It is also worth recalling that these are high-scoring applications on the SHMS. Privacy and anonymity

Alcohol problems are strongly stigmatised and sufferers often conceal their condition. The issue of anonymity and privacy is therefore crucial if health applications are to support the process of addressing alcohol-related problems. In our analysis, we also paid attention to ensuring anonymity and protecting privacy and have presented the results of the analysis in Table IV.

It is apparent that the issue of anonymity of users is not a priority for app developers. Only four out of 15 analysed applications provided secure access with a password or code, some sent hardly discreet notifications and most had a logo or name that clearly suggested alcohol-related problems. Some applications protected users’ privacy in the paid version only. In addition, six applications (out of 15) did not inform users about the privacy policies on the data they shared.

A positive example seems to be the nomo – Sobriety Clocks application with its neutral name and logo (after downloading, only the nomo text is displayed), requiring users to log in with their e-mail address and create a password. It is protected by a PIN code, which must be entered every time users open the application window and provides the address of the website, where the privacy and security policy of shared data is described in detail.

Discussion

The analysis of mobile applications available in the public domain, targeted at dependent persons, by type of available functionalities and their content, attractiveness, scope of impact and concern for protecting users’ privacy showed that most rate quite low in all analysed areas. We were also unable to assess the effectiveness of the analysed applications because we were not reach scientific studies assessing their effectiveness in supporting the process of dependence recovery. It seems that among the alcohol-related applications, the most popular actually encourage alcohol use [16]. In this context, only pro-health applications that have more than 100,000 downloads and more than 1,000 user reviews can be considered to have a relatively high coverage and this kind of application constituted 1/3 of our sample.

All analysed applications received a low score on the SHMS with the average on the scale from 1 to 18 being only 4 points (min. = 1, max. = 7.7). Most of the applications only scored in the educational and motivational area, and merely two contained functionalities related to the creation of strategies of coping in high-risk situations. Results were higher on the MARS (from 1 to 5 points). Application functionality was rated highest (average 4 points) and their content was rated lowest (average 2 points). The average number of points obtained on the application features scale related to coping with alcohol-use disorders was 3 (min. = 1.2, max. = 4.1). The applications with the highest scores on the MARS were also those obtaining relatively high scores on the SHMS.

Despite the relatively low rating of the analysed applications, the researchers identified many functionalities that potentially supported dependent persons in their recovery process. Almost all applications contained a sobriety tracker allowing abstinence monitoring and the creation of graphs based on user data. Moreover, savings calculated in money and calories were often monitored. Some, apart from monitoring abstinence, tracked emotional state (mood and related circumstances, quality of sleep, alcohol craving). Among the analysed applications there were also those that allowed the setting of personal goals to reducing drinking. Apart from monitoring, the applications contained some components: a motivational (sentences, prayers, proverbs), educational (knowledge about addiction, its manifestations and effects) and social (creating support networks, communicators, a discussion forum). The applications also offered help in crisis situations, e.g. possibility of contact with a therapist, locator of the nearest therapeutic facilities or meetings of self-help groups, health podcasts, simple distracting games. These results are consistent with that of similar review studies [13, 14].

As regards the protection of sensitive data, only some applications took appropriate steps to protect users’ privacy and provide them with full information on potential risks. These issues would seem to require much more attention, even if attempts to violate users’ privacy are unlikely. A review by Capon et al. [19] shows that users are not always informed about how the data collected through the application is stored and transmitted from the phone to the database. The issue of application developers’ credibility and motivation of has to be taken into account during the evaluation; the developers are private entities, and most of the analysed applications have a basic version free of charge (analysed in this study) and extended versions available only after purchasing the application.

The language barrier is also a problem. Of the analysed applications, only two were available in Polish. These are as-yet unevaluated applications developed by private firms with a relatively low reach, though their popularity is expected to grow. Two Polish applications stand out from the rest and have been highly reviewed by both researchers and users. The application Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż (I don’t drink, I don’t take, Guardian Angel) has over 10,000 downloads and a rating of 4.2 (on a scale from 1 to 5) reported by 186 users. The Alky Recovery application has over 5,000 downloads and a rating of 4.0 given by 53 users. On the MARS Alky Recovery was highly rated in terms of functionality and aesthetics. It also scored well on the other scales and was the third highest-rated application in terms of features relating to helping dependent persons. The Anioł Stróż (Guardian Angel) application scored lower on the MARS scales in terms of engagement, functionality, aesthetics or information but was one of the highest-rated applications in terms of its features related to helping dependent persons. Both applications also scored the highest on the SHMS (Anioł Stróż, Guardian Angel 7.7 points and Alky Recovery 6.5 points).

Conclusions

Mobile applications addressed to sufferers experiencing alcohol use problems focus primarily on self-observation [16]. It seems important to further develop components motivating abstinence, offering help in critical situations and creating support networks [10, 11, 15].

In Poland, there is still a lack of applications that could be recommended to patients and therapists as we do not have information on the effectiveness of these tools in relation to alcohol dependence. However, existing Polish applications seem to be a promise of change in this area, while the lack of sufficient care for users’ privacy remains problematic.

Conflict of interest

None declared.

Financial support

The project “Use of new technologies in the process of recovering from addiction (mWSPARCIE 2018-2020)” financed by the State Agency for the Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems as part of the implementation of the National Health Programme 2016-2020 (agreement 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Ethics

The work described in this article has been carried out in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) on medical research involving human subjects, Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals and the ethical principles defined in the Farmington Consensus of 1997.

References

1. Swan M. Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen. J Pers Med 2012; 2(3): 93-118.
2. Payne H, Lister C, West J, Bernhardt J. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature. JMIR mHealth uHealth 2016; 3(1): e20, 1.
3. Zadarko-Domaradzka M, Zadarko E. Aplikacje zdrowotne na urządzenia mobilne w edukacji zdrowotnej społeczeństwa. Edukacja – Technika – Informatyka 2016; 4(18): 291-6.
4. Fox S, Duggan M. Tracking for Health. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. Washington D.C.: Pew Research Center; 2013.
5. Haug S, Schaub MP, Venzin V, Meyer C, John U, Gmel G. A Pre-Post Study on the Appropriateness and Effectiveness of a Web- and Text Messaging-Based Intervention to Reduce Problem Drinking in Emerging Adults. J Med Internet Res 2013; 15(9): 126-37.
6. Haug S, Castro RP, Filler A, Kowatsch T, Fleisch E, Schaub MP. Efficacy of an internet and SMS-based integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention for smoking cessation in young people: study protocol of a two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial. BMC Public Health 2014; 14: 1140.
7. Michie S, Whittington C, Hamoudi Z, Zarnani F, Tober G, West R. Identification of behaviour change techniques to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Addiction 2012; 107(8): 1431-40.
8. Mirtenbaum ED, Domingo S, Fathi FD, Sobell LC. iSelfChange™: Randomized controlled trial of an iPhone app using an evidence-based alcohol intervention. 47th Annual Meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Addictive Behaviors SIG Student Poster Session. 2013. http://works.bepress.com/linda-sobell/233/.
9. Wieczorek Ł, Klingemann J. Mobile apps used to limit alcohol consumption – literature review. Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33(1): 43-64.
10. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
11. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an Evidence-Based, Theoretically Informed, Mobile Technology-Based System to Improve Outcomes for People in Recovery for Alcohol Dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111. DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2011.521413.
12. Lui JHL, Marcus DK, Barry CT. Evidence-based apps? A review of mental health mobile applications in a psychotherapy context. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2017; 48(3): 199-210. DOI: 10.1037/pro0000122.
13. Ramsey A. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80. DOI: 10.1007/s11469-015-9551-4.
14. Savic M, Best D, Rodda S, Lubman DI. Exploring the focus and experiences of smartphone applications for addiction recovery. J Addict Dis 2013; 32(3): 310-9.
15. Thakker J, Ward T. Relapse Prevention: A Critique and Proposed Reconceptualisation. Behaviour Change 2010; 27(3): 154-75.
16. Wróblewski M, Klingemann J, Wieczorek Ł. Review and analysis of the functionality of mobile apps related to alcohol consumption. Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33(1): 1-18.
17. Penzenstadler L, Chatton A, Van Singer M, Khazaal Y. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Alcohol Use Disorder. Eur Addict Res 2016; 22: 329-38. DOI: 10.1159/000449097.
18. Stoyanov SR, Hides L, Kavanagh DJ, Zelenko O, Tjondronegoro D, Mani M. Mobile App Rating Scale: A New Tool for Assessing the Quality of Health Mobile Apps. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015; 3(1): e27. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.3422.
19. Capon HW, Fry C, Carter A. Realising the technological promise of smartphones in addiction research and treatment: An ethical review. International Journal of Drug Policy 2016; 36: 47-57.

Wprowadzenie

Rosnące zainteresowanie aplikacjami mobilnymi w obszarze związanym z problemowym używaniem substancji psychoaktywnych odzwierciedla szerszą zmianę paradygmatu dokonującą się w opiece zdrowotnej. Zmiany w społecznej definicji zdrowia psychicznego i wynikające z nich nowe potrzeby i oczekiwania pacjentów skutkują rosnącą koncentracją zainteresowania na jednostce, która coraz bardziej aktywnie i świadomie monitoruje swoje wskaźniki zdrowia. Pojęcie mZdrowia dotyczy wszelkich działań wykorzystujących potencjał oprogramowania mobilnego (telefonów oraz smartfonów i mobilnych aplikacji zdrowotnych) w sferze zdrowia i opieki zdrowotnej. Podsumowując zmiany w tym obszarze, Swan [1] pisze o 80% użytkowników internetu poszukujących informacji o zdrowiu online, o 7 tys. aplikacji w dziedzinie zdrowia pobranych ponad 5 mld razy w 2010 r. oraz o nowej koncepcji siebie – policzalnym ja. Badania wskazują, że aplikacje mobilne są szeroko akceptowanym i użytecznym medium interwencji z zakresu zdrowia [2]. Z drugiej strony wykorzystanie nowych technologii nie jest równomiernie rozłożone w różnych częściach świata i różnych grupach potencjalnych użytkowników: w Polsce w 2015 r. prawie co trzeci internauta (31%) korzystał z mobilnych aplikacji zdrowotnych i sportowych [3]. W badaniu Fox and Duggan [4] tylko 19% użytkowników smartfonów pobrało aplikację zdrowotną, w tym zaledwie 10% w grupie osób powyżej 65. roku życia. W obszarze związanym z problemowym używaniem substancji psychoaktywnych aplikacje monitorujące spożycie alkoholu i korzystające z koncepcji krótkich interwencji służą wzmacnianiu świadomości ryzyka oraz zmianie zachowania w populacji generalnej. Poza tym istnieją aplikacje podtrzymujące kontakt z byłymi pacjentami lecznictwa uzależnień czy aplikacje zorientowane na zapobieganie nawrotom, a nawet takie, które wykorzystują koncepcje wspomaganych samowyleczeń z uzależnienia [5–9]. Tego typu interwencje wydają się szczególnie wartościowe w odniesieniu do uzależnienia od alkoholu – wskaźnik nawrotów po zakończeniu terapii jest wysoki, a proces wychodzenia z uzależnienia od alkoholu wymaga czasu i różnych źródeł wsparcia w jego utrwalaniu.

Badacze zauważają, że o ile uzależnienie od alkoholu jest powszechnie traktowane jako choroba przewlekła, o tyle lecznictwo rzadko oferuje jakiekolwiek formy długoterminowego wsparcia i zapobiegania nawrotom u pacjentów, którzy ukończyli leczenie. A przynajmniej nie takiego wsparcia, jakiego udziela się osobom cierpiącym z powodu innych przewlekłych zaburzeń [10, 11].

Wykorzystanie aplikacji w kontekście terapeutycznym może oznaczać pomoc w oszacowaniu objawów uzależnienia, dostarczenie informacji z zakresu psychoedukacji, wzmocnienie zaangażowania, motywacji i czasu utrzymywania się w leczeniu [12]. Aplikacje mogą zawierać cały wachlarz funkcjonalności odpowiadających różnym potrzebom użytkowników, w praktyce jednak okazuje się, że popularność poszczególnych rozwiązań jest bardzo zróżnicowana.

W przeglądzie Ramsey [13] główną drogą wspierania procesu radzenia sobie z problemowym używaniem alkoholu było dostarczanie ogólnych informacji na temat ryzyka związanego z piciem, rodzajów dostępnego leczenia i wiedzy na temat uzależnienia (37%). Informacje te miały zwykle charakter e-booków, bez elementów interakcyjnych. Aplikacje dostarczały też wiadomości motywujących do zmiany i anegdot z życia osób, które skutecznie poradziły sobie z piciem (21%). Część analizowanych aplikacji oferowało narzędzia do monitorowania dni abstynencji (24%) lub poziomu konsumpcji (22%; ilość wypitego alkoholu w ciągu ostatniego miesiąca). Niektóre proponowały pomoc w stanie nietrzeźwości, np. przez kwestionariusze szacujące poziom nietrzeźwości lub zachęcanie do picia wody pomiędzy drinkami (28% aplikacji); pomoc w zapobieganiu prowadzenia pod wpływem alkoholu (22% aplikacji; telefon do przyjaciela lub po taksówkę); unikanie problemów towarzyskich (3%; blokowanie mediów społecznościowych i komunikatorów) [13]. Z badań Savic i wsp. [14] wynika, że najczęściej spotykaną wśród ogółu badanych aplikacji (n = 87) funkcjonalnością jest dostarczanie informacji dotyczących uzależnienia oraz wyleczenia (69%). Blisko połowa badanych aplikacji miała na celu wzmocnienie motywacji do zmiany (49%) przez medytacje i modlitwy (30%), historie tych, którym się udało (22%), listy podejmowanych działań (15%). Tylko 38% aplikacji wzmacniało więzi, rozwijało możliwość dawania bądź uzyskiwania wsparcia przez takie funkcjonalności, jak lokalizatory grup samopomocowych i placówek terapeutycznych (23%), linki do społeczności online (21%), szybki dostęp do listy osobistych kontaktów (11%). Z kolei 28% aplikacji zawierało funkcjonalności interaktywne: głównie wykresy i liczniki dni trzeźwości, jedynie 2% – funkcjonalności związane z nagradzaniem. Więcej niż 3/4 aplikacji (82%) bazuje przede wszystkim na tekście, inne media są znacznie rzadziej używane: audio 18%, mapy 10%, grafiki 8%, wideo 7%. Do rzadkości należały też elementy gry – przyznawanie punktów czy zdobywanie poziomów, chociaż jak się wydaje są to potencjalne źródła nagradzania i pozytywnych wzmocnień. Istotne jest też to, że aplikacje wymagają stałej troski, ulepszania, a ich twórcy powinni zwracać uwagę na informacje od użytkowników [14].

Wydaje się, że rozwiązania z zakresu mZdrowia mogą stać się odpowiedzią na lukę w ofercie lecznictwa, dając szansę na utrzymywanie długotrwałego kontaktu z placówką leczniczą oraz na przezwyciężenie barier związanych ze stygmatyzacją, wykluczeniem geograficznym i wysokimi kosztami leczenia. Dzięki tego typu rozwiązaniom technologicznym pacjenci czują silniejszą łączność z placówką leczniczą, mają poczucie, że ich choroba jest starannie monitorowana, a oni sami nie zostali zapomniani przez terapeutę [9–11]. Istotnym elementem jest poczucie bycia w kontakcie z innymi, możliwość uzyskania wsparcia społecznego, również przez zaangażowanie w grupy samopomocowe [15]. Duże znaczenie ma tu wysoka dostępność pomocy terapeutycznej w sytuacjach kryzysu. Wyzwaniem mogą jednak okazać się kwestie związane z prywatnością i poufnością. Potencjalnych problemów jest wiele, np. ujawnienie danych wprowadzonych do aplikacji osobom nieuprawnionym przez ich kradzież cyfrową lub też utratę telefonu, nieodpowiednie zabezpieczenie danych w ramach aplikacji, nieuświadamianie sobie przez użytkowników, do jakiego typu informacji mają dostęp twórcy aplikacji [9, 11]. Wyzwanie stanowi również niezwykła dynamika rozwoju nowych technologii – stale pojawia się wiele nowych rozwiązań, za którymi trudno nadążyć laikom, stąd potrzeba badań analizujących aktualnie dostępne na rynku aplikacje pod kątem możliwości, jakie ze sobą niosą.

Zaprezentowany w artykule przegląd dostępnych w domenie publicznej aplikacji mobilnych skierowanych do osób uzależnionych od alkoholu ma na celu ocenę ich potencjału jako narzędzi wspierających proces terapii uzależnienia od alkoholu. Wybrano szereg różnych aplikacji i analizowano je ze względu na zawarte w nich treści, atrakcyjność, jakość, zakres oddziaływania, rodzaj dostępnych funkcjonalności oraz troskę o zabezpieczenie prywatności użytkowników.

Materiał i metody

Źródłem wyszukiwania aplikacji były bazy Google Play oraz AppStore. W pierwszej dostępne są aplikacje działające w systemie Android, w drugiej natomiast – w systemie iOS. W celu wyszukania aplikacji wykorzystano następujące słowa kluczowe: drinking, drink, alcohol, sobriety, alcoholism, alcohol addiction. Dane zbierano od września do grudnia 2018 r., ostatnia aktualizacja bazy miała miejsce 13 grudnia 2018 r. Kolejny etap wyszukiwania polegał na dokonaniu analizy aplikacji na podstawie dostępnych w bazach Google Play oraz AppStore opisów zawartych w aplikacjach funkcjonalności oraz informacji o cenie i liczbie pobrań. Proces ten szczegółowo opisano w innym artykule [16]. Na podstawie opisów z pogłębionej analizy wykluczono: 1) aplikacje płatne, 2) aplikacje z zerową liczbą ściągnięć oraz tzw. aplikacje nieopublikowane, przeznaczone dla testerów, 3) aplikacje, które w różnej formie zachęcają do picia alkoholu, np. przez ułatwianie dostępu czy też wspomaganie procesu konsumpcji, 4) aplikacje zniechęcające do używania alkoholu, ale w bardzo ograniczonym zakresie – przez jedną lub dwie proste funkcjonalności. Do pogłębionej analizy włączono aplikacje, które miały w opinii badaczy największy potencjał wspomagania procesu terapeutycznego, ponieważ zawierały szereg różnych funkcjonalności i w większym stopniu niż inne angażowały użytkownika (n = 16). Z 16 wybranych aplikacji wykluczono jedną ze względu na problem z jej uruchomieniem (ryc. 1).

Ostatecznie 15 aplikacji poddano procesowi dalszej ewaluacji przy użyciu zmodyfikowanych wersji dwóch skal: Self-Help Model Scale (SHMS) [17] oraz Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [18]. Osiem z nich było dostępnych w obu bazach, sześć tylko w bazie Google Play, jedna tylko w bazie AppStore. Self-Help Model Scale (SHMS) [17] pozwala określić zakres, w jakim aplikacja wspomaga użytkownika w radzeniu sobie z problemami alkoholowymi przez punktowe ocenianie poszczególnych funkcjonalności. Modyfikacja SHMS polegała na przypisaniu poszczególnych itemów skali do czterech kategorii tematycznych: 1) poziom edukacyjno-motywacyjny, 2) identyfikacja sytuacji podwyższonego ryzyka, 3) strategie radzenia sobie w sytuacjach podwyższonego ryzyka, 4) poziom zapobiegania nawrotom uzależnienia. Ponadto w obszarze tematycznym „strategie radzenia sobie w sytuacjach podwyższonego ryzyka” zmodyfikowano punktację skali z 0–2 pkt, na 0–1 pkt (tab. I).

Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [18] jest skalą stworzoną do oceny różnego typu aplikacji zdrowotnych. Składa się z: 1) części dotyczącej ogólnej charakterystyki aplikacji i jej funkcjonalności; 2) części oceniających: a) zaangażowanie, b) funkcjonalność, c) estetykę oraz d) zakres informacji; 3) części pozwalającej na subiektywną ocenę atrakcyjności aplikacji; 4) części pozwalającej na ocenę zgodności aplikacji ze specyficznie określonymi celami związanymi ze zmianą postaw i zachowań zdrowotnych. W projekcie mWsparcie testerzy w części czwartej oceniali aplikacje pod kątem: rozwijania świadomości własnego problemu, zwiększenia poziomu wiedzy, zwiększenia poczucia samoskuteczności i motywacji do zmiany, zwiększenia szans na poszukiwanie pomocy terapeutycznej, zmianę zachowania nałogowego oraz poszukiwanie różnych form wsparcia społecznego, zmniejszenia szans nawrotu uzależnienia. Skala została również zmodyfikowana w części (2d) oceniającej zakres informacji. Odpowiedzi nie dotyczy zostały potraktowane jako odpowiedzi o wartości 0 i – wbrew zaleceniom twórców skali – wliczone do ogólnej średniej. W naszej opinii takie odpowiedzi, jak „aplikacja nie zawiera informacji” czy „aplikacja nie ma uzasadnienia naukowego” nie są neutralne i powinny obniżać końcową ocenę.

Ewaluację prowadzono przez dwa tygodnie, posługując się telefonami wyposażonymi w systemy operacyjne Android oraz iOS. Aplikacje były testowane przez trzy osoby: pierwszy tester oceniał wszystkie 15 aplikacji, drugi i trzeci – po osiem aplikacji. Jedna z aplikacji – Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż – była testowana przez trzech testerów. Oceny przez nich wydane zostały uśrednione (tab. II).

Wyniki

Wstępny dobór aplikacji opierał się na ich opisie zawartym w bazach Google Play i Apple Store. Pogłębiona analiza zawartości tych aplikacji była możliwa dopiero po pobraniu ich z bazy – dwóch niezależnych testerów każdą z nich poddało kilkudniowym testom. Wyniki pokazują, że analizowane aplikacje różniły się znacząco liczbą i złożonością zawartych w nich funkcjonalności. Poniżej zaprezentowano wyniki analizy wskaźników ilościowych dostępnych dla ewaluowanych aplikacji oraz szczegółową charakterystykę aplikacji (począwszy od najpopularniejszych) analizowanych pod kątem zawartych w nich funkcjonalności wspomagających proces radzenia sobie z uzależnieniem. W dalszej części artykułu przedstawiono wyniki ewaluacji zawartości aplikacji przy wykorzystaniu obu skal: SHMS i MARS.

Wskaźniki wpływu
W bazie Google Play dostępnych jest kilka wskaźników, takich jak liczba ocen użytkowników czy też średnia wysokość ocen, które obrazują zarówno popularność danej aplikacji, jak i zakres jej oddziaływania. Duża liczba ocen świadczyła o tym, że dana aplikacja wzbudziła zainteresowanie, a użytkownicy chętnie dzielili się opiniami na jej temat. Innym dostępnym wskaźnikiem jest liczba pobrań aplikacji – baza Google Play nie udostępnia dokładnej liczby pobrań, a jedynie przedziały. Dane na temat analizowanych aplikacji przedstawiono w tabeli III.

Pięć spośród analizowanych aplikacji można scharakteryzować jako aplikacje o stosunkowo wysokim zakresie oddziaływania – z liczbą pobrań ponad 100 tys. Kolejnych pięć to aplikacje o umiarkowanym zakresie oddziaływania – od 10 tys. do 50 tys. pobrań.
Wśród najczęściej ocenianych aplikacji znalazły się Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock (13 972 oceny) oraz Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking/Easy Quit (9301 ocen), która była też aplikacją najwyżej ocenianą przez użytkowników (średnia 4,9). Inną wysoko ocenianą aplikacją była I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety (średnia 4,8).

Charakterystyka analizowanych aplikacji

Aplikacje o najwyższym zakresie oddziaływania
Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) to aplikacja, która umożliwia monitorowanie dni trzeźwości oraz zmian w samopoczuciu i stanie zdrowia. Użytkownik ma możliwość uzyskania spersonalizowanych informacji na temat wpływu alkoholu na swoje zdrowie. Aplikacja pokazuje, po ilu dniach niepicia komórki nerwowe zaczną się regenerować albo kiedy pojawią się objawy odstawienia. Użytkownik ma dostęp do zestawu wskazówek i sentencji motywujących go do wytrwania w trzeźwości, również do tworzenia własnych. Dodatkowo aplikacja zawiera grę (memory game), której celem jest odwrócenie uwagi od myśli o alkoholu. Sobriety Counter umożliwia też stworzenie programu stopniowego wychodzenia z nałogu (slow mode). Jej zaletą jest przejrzysta instrukcja obsługi.

I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety to też przede wszystkim tracker, który jednak pozwala monitorować zarówno konsumpcję alkoholu, jak i innych substancji. Użytkownik opisuje swoją motywację do trzeźwości („chcę być trzeźwy, ponieważ…”, która potem służy jako motywujące przypomnienie). Aplikacja codziennie wieczorem „pyta” o postępy w utrzymywaniu trzeźwości, o stopień trudności w ich osiągnięciu oraz o czynności wykonywane danego dnia. Dzięki temu użytkownik monitoruje nie tylko liczbę dni, w których zdarzały się sytuacje ryzykowne, lecz także okoliczności, w jakich miało to miejsce. I Am Sober pyta również o zauważalne zmiany stanu zdrowia, funkcjonowania i samopoczucia po osiągnięciu kamienia milowego (np. miesiąca trzeźwości), udzielając jednocześnie informacji, jaki odsetek użytkowników odpowiedział podobnie. Aplikacja daje ponadto możliwość skorzystania online z usług (prywatnego) terapeuty, a po wpisaniu kodu pocztowego informuje o najbliższych placówkach terapeutycznych.

Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock ma wbudowany komunikator i pozwala na szybki kontakt z osobą wspierającą, tzw. sponsorem. Na podstawie gromadzonych danych (liczba dni, ilość zaoszczędzonych pieniędzy) tworzy wykresy. Pozwala również odnotować moment przerwania okresu trzeźwości i krótko go opisać (notatka). Użytkownik ma ponadto możliwość nie tylko osiągnięcia celów zdefiniowanych w aplikacji (np. pozostanie trzeźwym przez miesiąc), lecz również określanie własnych.

Sobriety Clock to przykład trackera, który nawiązuje do filozofii 12 Kroków AA, jednak tu użytkownicy mogą wybrać rodzaj uzależnienia (narkotyki i/lub alkohol). Oprócz monitorowania trzeźwości aplikacja umożliwia dostęp do cytatów motywacyjnych i szybki kontakt z osobą wspierającą – sponsorem.

AA 12 Step App – Steps Toolbox to aplikacja służąca do wspomagania terapii metodą 12 Kroków. Oprócz tradycyjnego trackera trzeźwości zawiera informacje na temat ruchu Anonimowych Alkoholików i funkcjonalności powiązanych z poszczególnymi krokami (np. robienie rachunku sumienia czy cowieczorne medytacje). Jej zaletą jest intuicyjna obsługa poszczególnych stron.

Aplikacje o średnim zakresie oddziaływania

Podobną aplikacją jest AA App – 12 Steps Toolkit – Alcoholics Anonymous, która również daje użytkownikowi możliwość śledzenia trzeźwych dni i prowadzenie dzienniczka uczuć. Jej zaletą jest neutralna ikona (a tym samym zabezpieczająca prywatność użytkownika) oraz nazwa aplikacji wyświetlająca się po jej pobraniu – My Toolkit.

Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help zawiera przede wszystkim informacje dostarczone w formie pytań i odpowiedzi, na zasadzie tzw. drzewa decyzyjnego. Dla przykładu, użytkownik zaznacza „myślę o powrocie do nałogu”, a następnie „mam ochotę się teraz napić”, a na ekranie wyświetlają się opowieści użytkowników motywujące do wytrwania w trzeźwości. Takie wiadomości możemy sami wyszukiwać, sami tworzyć i oceniać. Ponadto aplikacja zawiera funkcjonalności trackingowe, daje możliwość kontaktu z osobą wspierającą – sponsorem, porozmawiania na forum oraz – dzięki geolokalizacji – wskazuje miejsca najbliższych spotkań grup samopomocowych.

Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż to aplikacja polskojęzyczna. W aplikacji użytkownik zaznacza nie tylko momenty picia i niepicia, lecz także odczuwania głodu alkoholowego. Jeżeli zaznaczymy dużą liczbę dni z głodem bądź piciem, aplikacja podpowiada, żebyśmy skontaktowali się z Centrum Pomocy Anioł Stróż (placówką prywatną – aplikacja podaje numer telefonu). Aplikacja ma wbudowane własne forum, na którym trzeba się osobno zarejestrować. Znajdziemy w niej ponadto krótki opis filozofii 12 Kroków AA i program HALT (hungry, angry, lonely, tired). Opisane są nie tylko czynniki ryzyka związane z czterema stanami emocjonalnymi, lecz także co należy robić w sytuacjach kryzysowych, np. „Wypij herbatę, szklankę wody mineralnej, soku czy mleka, specjaliści zalecają też coś słodkiego. Wówczas zapotrzebowanie na alkohol znacznie słabnie”. Aplikacja ma funkcję cyklicznego przypominania o programie HALT i o wypełnianiu kalendarza (można ustawić określoną godzinę, kiedy to robi). Dzięki niej możemy również stworzyć sieć wsparcia, to znaczy dodać imiona i numery telefonów osób, z którymi chcemy być w bliskim kontakcie. Dodatkowo aplikacja zawiera treści audio (muzykę relaksacyjną, wiersze, podcasty).

Nomo – Sobriety Clocks jest przykładem aplikacji, która może pomóc w sytuacjach kryzysowych. Zawiera opcję refocus, która zachęca użytkownika do czynności odwracających uwagę od myśli o alkoholu (gry bazujące na pamięci czy refleksie). Znajdują się tutaj również wiadomości motywujące do radzenia sobie z uzależnieniem, które są tworzone przez użytkowników aplikacji. Każdy może napisać własne lub polubić sentencje innych. W nomo, podobnie jak w omówionej poniżej iRecovery, tworzymy własną grupę wsparcia – przez dodawanie przyjaciół lub członków rodziny, do których aplikacja wysyła wiadomości w momencie kryzysu (funkcja SOS). Ponadto aplikacja może nam zasugerować kogoś z grona innych użytkowników, którzy mają podobny do nas profil. Zaletą jest również jej nazwa i logo niekojarzące się z uzależnieniem. Aplikacja Dry January and Beyond/Dry Days zawiera przede wszystkim szereg funkcjonalności trackingowych: użytkownik uzyskuje informację nie tylko o liczbie trzeźwych dni, lecz także o ilości zaoszczędzonych pieniędzy czy niespożytych kalorii. W aplikacji znajduje się kalendarz, do którego można wprowadzić epizody alkoholowe wraz z oceną, jak czuliśmy się tego dnia i jak spaliśmy. Aplikacja pomaga oszacować zawartość alkoholu we krwi oraz porównuje dni picia i trzeźwości.

Aplikacje o niskim zakresie oddziaływania
Kolejną polską aplikacją odwołującą się do filozofii 12 Kroków AA jest Alky Recovery. Ma ona funkcjonalności trackingowe, pozwala na dokonanie wstępnej diagnozy swoich nawyków (w formie testu sygnałów ostrzegawczych) oraz prowadzenie dzienniczka głodu alkoholowego (aplikacja pyta o różne objawy, np. natrętne myślenie o alkoholu, pozwala również na dokonywanie okresowych analiz, kiedy i w jakich okolicznościach najczęściej pojawiał się głód). Aplikacja umożliwia również bezpośredni kontakt z terapeutą i zawiera bazę ośrodków leczenia uzależnień wykorzystującą lokalizatory GPS. Alky Recovery zawiera funkcjonalności społecznościowe. Główny ekran aplikacji jest pulpitem podobnym do Facebooka, na którym pojawiają się różnego rodzaju treści dotyczące problemów alkoholowych – można je komentować i polubić. Aplikacja buduje też społeczność użytkowników – ma wbudowany własny komunikator. Aplikacja iRecovery pozwala na stworzenie planu zdrowienia przez zdefiniowanie trzech rodzajów zachowań: niebezpiecznych, średnio bezpiecznych i bezpiecznych, oznaczonych kolejno kolorami: czerwonym, żółtym i zielonym. Specyficznie funkcjonuje tutaj element społecznościowy – użytkownik tworzy sobie krąg wsparcia, czyli listę osób, do których można zadzwonić bądź napisać za pomocą aplikacji. W iRecovery otrzymujemy punkty nie tylko za kolejne trzeźwe dni, lecz także za konkretne zachowania. Te ostatnie podzielone są na kilka kategorii (np. „duchowe” albo „psychologiczne”) i znajdziemy tam takie elementy jak „spotkanie grupy wsparcia” czy „ćwiczenia fizyczne”. Aplikacja pozwala również na samodzielne zdefiniowanie czynności i przyporządkowanie jej odpowiedniej liczby punktów.

Quit for Health Lite oraz Recovery Elevator Sobriets są trackerami z dwoma dodatkowymi funkcjami: społecznościową i informacyjną. Obie pozwalają na uczestnictwo w forum społecznościowym (w Quit for Health Lite działa ono podobnie jak Facebook) i dostarczają użytkownikowi wiedzy na temat uzależnienia (w Recovery Elevator jest to baza 200 podcastów). W obydwu aplikacjach można dodawać zdjęcia i opisy, które przypominają nam o powodach, dla których chcemy przestać pić. W Quit for Health Lite alkohol jest jedną z substancji, której spożycie można próbować ograniczyć, obok nikotyny, cukru i niezdrowego jedzenia. Aplikacja pokazuje ponadto ranking trzeźwych dni – przy każdym epizodzie napicia się alkoholu użytkownik dostaje informację, jak długo wytrwał tym razem, może też zobaczyć swoje najdłuższe okresy trzeźwości. Pojawiają się tu też krótkie i zrozumiałe informacje o szkodach powodowanych przez alkohol. Sober Tree służy przede wszystkim do monitorowania konsumpcji alkoholu. Aplikacja codziennie pyta użytkownika o picie alkoholu i pozwala na sporządzenie raportu okresowego. Zawiera również funkcjonalności społecznościowe (wbudowany chat).

Ewaluacja przy wykorzystaniu SHMS
(Self-Help Model Scale)
Testowane aplikacje osiągnęły stosunkowo niskie wyniki na SHMS, która ma zakres od 0 do 18 pkt. Najwyżej oceniona aplikacja uzyskała 7,7 pkt, najniżej – tylko 1 pkt. Średni wynik ewaluacji wyniósł 4. Na rycinie 2 przedstawiono wynik ewaluacji aplikacji w poszczególnych obszarach: I – poziom edukacyjno-motywacyjny; II – identyfikacja sytuacji podwyższonego ryzyka; III – strategie radzenia sobie w sytuacjach podwyższonego ryzyka; IV – poziom zapobiegania nawrotowi uzależnienia. Większość aplikacji uzyskała punkty w obszarze edukacyjno-motywacyjnym, co oznacza, że głównym celem ocenianych aplikacji było przekazanie wiedzy na temat uzależnienia od alkoholu, dostarczenie informacji na temat własnego stanu zdrowia i motywowanie do utrzymywania trzeźwości. Punkty w kategorii zapobieganie nawrotom uzależnienia dotyczyły głównie zautomatyzowanego systemu nagród (w postaci odznak, punktów, kamieni milowych czy medali). Najsłabiej reprezentowane były funkcjonalności związane ze strategiami radzenia sobie w sytuacjach kryzysowych – jedynie dwie aplikacje uzyskały punkty w tym obszarze.

Czterema najlepiej ocenianymi aplikacjami na SHMS są: Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł stróż (7,7 pkt), Alky Recovery (6,5 pkt), nomo – Sobriety Clocks (6,0 pkt), Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help (6,9 pkt). Aplikacje te uzyskały punktację we wszystkich czterech obszarach. Warto tutaj zauważyć, że żadna z nich nie jest aplikacją o wysokim zasięgu oddziaływania.

Dwie aplikacje z grupy o najwyższym zakresie oddziaływania uzyskały stosunkowo wysoki wynik na SHMS: I Am Sober – Motivation for Tracking Sobriety (średnia ocen użytkowników 4,8; wynik SHMS: 5,5) oraz Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit) (średnia ocen użytkowników 4,9; wynik SHMS: 5,5).

Wśród aplikacji o najwyższym zakresie oddziaływania znalazły się też dwie aplikacje ocenione bardzo nisko na SHMS: Sober Time – Quit Drinking, Sobriety Tracker Clock (średnia ocen użytkowników 4,7; wynik SHMS: 1,5) oraz Sobriety Clock (średnia ocen użytkowników 4,3; wynik SHMS: 1,5).

Ewaluacja przy wykorzystaniu MARS (Mobile Application Rating Scale)
Aplikacją najbardziej angażującą użytkownika okazała się Sobriety Counter – Stop Drinking (Easy Quit), która jest również najlepiej ocenianą przez użytkowników aplikacją z naszej ogólnej próby (średnia 4,9), jedną z najczęściej ocenianych (9301) i najczęściej pobieranych (powyżej 100 tys.). Tak wysoką ocenę w tej kategorii można tłumaczyć tym, że zawiera ona grywalny moduł (w postaci gry memory) i pokazuje, w jaki sposób niepicie wpływa pozytywnie na różne parametry zdrowotne (ryc. 3).

Aplikacjami o najlepszej funkcjonalności są Alky Recovery oraz Sober Tool – Alcoholism, Addiction, Sobriety Help, a w kategorii estetycznej najlepiej oceniono Sober Time, która wyróżnia się na tle innych szatą graficzną. W kategorii związanej z informacją najlepiej wypadła Alky Recovery. Informacje są tam przekazywane w formie linków do różnego rodzaju treści, które, podobnie jak na Facebooku, można polubić bądź skomentować. Alky Recovery wypadło również najlepiej w średniej określającej ogólną jakość aplikacji i we wskaźniku subiektywnej oceny (ryc. 4).

Biorąc pod uwagę zgodność poszczególnych aplikacji z celem, jakim jest wsparcie w terapii uzależnień, widzimy, że czterema najwyżej ocenionymi są: Sober Tool, Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż, Alky Recovery oraz nomo. Wszystkie one łączą w sobie wiele funkcjonalności: od trackera przez elementy społecznościowe po funkcje bezpośrednio odnoszące się do radzenia sobie z nawrotami uzależnienia bądź z głodem alkoholowym. Warto też przypomnieć, że są to aplikacje, które uzyskały wysokie wyniki również w przypadku SHMS. Prywatność i anonimowość

Problemy alkoholowe podlegają silnej stygmatyzacji i są często ukrywane. Kwestia anonimowości oraz prywatności jest zatem niezwykle istotna przy korzystaniu z aplikacji zdrowotnych wspomagających proces radzenia sobie z problemami związanymi z alkoholem. W niniejszej analizie zwracano również uwagę na zapewnienie anonimowości i ochronę prywatności. Wyniki analizy zostały przedstawione w tabeli IV. Jak można zauważyć, kwestie anonimowości użytkowników nie są traktowane priorytetowo przez twórców aplikacji. Tylko cztery z 15 analizowanych aplikacji dawały możliwość zabezpieczenia dostępu hasłem lub kodem, niektóre z nich wysyłały mało dyskretne powiadomienia, większość miała logo lub nazwę wyraźnie sugerującą problemy z alkoholem. Niektóre aplikacje zabezpieczały prywatność użytkowników tylko w płatnej wersji. Ponadto w sześciu aplikacjach (z 15) nie informowano użytkowników o polityce dotyczącej zabezpieczenia prywatności udostępnianych danych.

Pozytywnym przykładem wydaje się tu aplikacja nomo – Sobriety Clocks posiadająca neutralną nazwę oraz logo (po pobraniu wyświetla się wyłącznie napis nomo), wymagająca zalogowania się za pomocą adresu e-mail i stworzenia hasła. Jest ona zabezpieczona kodem PIN, który należy wprowadzać każdorazowo przy otwarciu okna aplikacji i udostępnia adres strony internetowej, na której szczegółowo opisano politykę dotyczącą prywatności oraz zabezpieczenia udostępnianych danych.

Omówienie

Analiza dostępnych w domenie publicznej aplikacji mobilnych skierowanych do osób uzależnionych, ze względu na rodzaj dostępnych funkcjonalności i zawarte w nich treści, atrakcyjność, zakres oddziaływania oraz troskę o zabezpieczenie prywatności użytkowników, pokazała, że większość z nich klasyfikuje się dość nisko we wszystkich analizowanych obszarach. Nie byliśmy też w stanie ocenić efektywności analizowanych aplikacji – nie udało nam się dotrzeć do badań naukowych oceniających ich skuteczność we wspieraniu procesu zdrowienia z uzależnienia.

Wydaje się, że wśród aplikacji związanych z alkoholem największą popularnością cieszą się te zachęcające do jego spożywania [16]. W tym kontekście tylko aplikacje prozdrowotne, które mają ponad 100 tys. pobrań i liczbę ocen użytkowników powyżej 1000, można uznać za te o stosunkowo wysokim zasięgu – aplikacje takie stanowiły 1/3 naszej próby.

Wszystkie analizowane aplikacje uzyskały niski wynik w przypadku SHMS – średni wynik ocen na skali od 1 do 18 wyniósł tylko 4 pkt (min. = 1, maks. = 7,7). Większość aplikacji uzyskała punkty wyłącznie w obszarze edukacyjno-motywacyjnym, tylko dwie zawierały funkcjonalności związane z tworzeniem strategii radzenia sobie w sytuacjach podwyższonego ryzyka. W przypadku MARS (od 1 do 5 pkt) wyniki były wyższe: najwyżej oceniano funkcjonalność aplikacji (średnia 4 pkt), najniżej ich treść (średnia 2 pkt). Średnia liczba punktów uzyskanych na skali dotyczącej cech aplikacji odnoszących się do radzenia sobie z uzależnieniem wyniosła 3 (min. = 1,2; maks. = 4,1). Aplikacje najwyżej ocenione na MARS były jednocześnie aplikacjami uzyskującymi stosunkowo wysokie wyniki na SHMS.

Pomimo stosunkowo niskiej oceny analizowanych aplikacji badacze zidentyfikowali wiele funkcjonalności potencjalnie wspierających osoby uzależnione w procesie zdrowienia. Prawie wszystkie aplikacje zawierały tracker trzeźwości umożliwiający monitorowanie abstynencji i tworzenie wykresów na podstawie danych użytkownika. Ponadto często monitorowano również oszczędności liczone np. w pieniądzach czy kaloriach. Niektóre z nich, poza monitorowaniem abstynencji, umożliwiały monitorowanie samopoczucia (nastroju i okoliczności związanych z obniżonym nastrojem, jakości snu, głodu alkoholowego). Wśród analizowanych aplikacji znalazły się też takie, które umożliwiały zdefiniowanie własnych celów związanych z ograniczaniem picia. Poza monitorowaniem aplikacje zawierały funkcjonalności o charakterze motywacyjnym (sentencje, modlitwy, przysłowia), edukacyjnym (wiedza o uzależnieniu, jego przejawach i skutkach) oraz społecznościowym (tworzenie sieci wsparcia, komunikatory, forum dyskusyjne). Aplikacje oferowały również pomoc w sytuacjach kryzysu, np. możliwość kontaktu z terapeutą, lokalizator najbliższych placówek terapeutycznych lub spotkań grup samopomocowych, podcasty na temat zdrowienia, proste gry rozpraszające uwagę. Te wyniki są zgodne z wynikami podobnych badań przeglądowych [13, 14]. Jeśli chodzi o kwestie związane z ochroną danych wrażliwych, tylko część aplikacji posiadała zabezpieczenia prywatności użytkowników i podawała pełną informację na temat potencjalnych zagrożeń. Jak się wydaje, wymagają one znacznie większej uwagi, nawet jeśli próby naruszenia prywatności użytkowników są mało prawdopodobne. Z przeglądu Capon i wsp. [19] wynika, że użytkownicy nie zawsze są informowani o sposobie przechowywania danych zebranych za pomocą aplikacji i sposobie ich przesyłania z telefonu do bazy. Kwestię wiarygodności i motywacji twórców aplikacji brano pod uwagę przy ewaluacji – twórcami są podmioty prywatne, a większość analizowanych aplikacji ma wersję podstawową – bezpłatną (poddawaną analizie w tym badaniu), oraz wersje rozszerzone, dostępne wyłącznie po zakupieniu aplikacji. Problemem jest również bariera językowa. Spośród analizowanych aplikacji tylko dwie były dostępne w języku polskim. To aplikacje stworzone przez podmioty prywatne, dotychczas nie ewaluowane i o stosunkowo niskim zasięgu, należy się jednak spodziewać, że ich popularność będzie rosła. Obie polskie aplikacje wyróżniają się na tle pozostałych i zostały wysoko ocenione zarówno przez badaczy, jak i użytkowników. Aplikacja Nie piję, Nie biorę, Anioł Stróż ma ponad 10 tys. pobrań i ocenę 4,2 (w skali od 1 do 5) wydaną przez 186 użytkowników. Aplikacja Alky Recovery ma ponad 5 tys. pobrań i ocenę 4,0 wydaną przez 53 użytkowników. Na MARS Alky Recovery została wysoko oceniona pod kątem funkcjonalności i estetyki, uzyskała też dobre wyniki na pozostałych skalach i była trzecią najwyżej ocenioną aplikacją pod względem cech odnoszących się do pomocy osobom uzależnionym. Aplikacja Anioł Stróż uzyskała niższe wyniki na skalach MARS dotyczących zaangażowania, funkcjonalności, estetyki czy informacji, była jednak jedną z wyżej ocenianych aplikacji, jeśli chodzi o te jej cechy, które odnoszą się do pomocy osobom uzależnionym. Obydwie aplikacje uzyskały też najwyższy wynik na SHMS (Anioł Stróż 7,7 pkt, a Alky Recovery 6,5 pkt).

Wnioski

Aplikacje mobilne skierowane do osób doświadczających problemów wynikających z używania alkoholu koncentrują się przede wszystkim na samoobserwacji [16]. Istotne wydaje się dalsze rozwijanie funkcjonalności motywujących do abstynencji, oferujących pomoc w sytuacjach krytycznych i tworzeniu sieci wsparcia [10, 11, 15].

W Polsce ciągle brakuje aplikacji, które mogłyby być rekomendowane pacjentom i terapeutom, ponieważ nie mamy informacji dotyczących efektywności tych narzędzi w odniesieniu do uzależnienia od alkoholu. Istniejące polskie aplikacje wydają się jednak obiecującą zapowiedzią zmian w tym obszarze. Problemem pozostaje brak wystarczającej troski o kwestie związane z prywatnością użytkowników.

Konflikt interesów

Nie występuje.

Finansowanie

Projekt „Wykorzystanie nowych technologii w procesie zdrowienia z uzależnienia (mWSPARCIE 2018–2020)” finansowany przez Państwową Agencję Rozwiązywania Problemów Alkoholowych w ramach realizacji zadań Narodowego Programu Zdrowia 2016–2020 (umowa 76/44/3.4.3/18/DEA).

Etyka

Treści przedstawione w pracy są zgodne z zasadami Deklaracji Helsińskiej odnoszącymi się do badań z udziałem ludzi, ujednoliconymi wymaganiami dla czasopism biomedycznych oraz z zasadami etycznymi określonymi w Porozumieniu z Farmington w 1997 roku.

Piśmiennictwo

1. Swan M. Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen. J Pers Med 2012; 2(3): 93-118.
2. Payne H, Lister C, West J, Bernhardt J. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature. JMIR mHealth uHealth 2016; 3(1): e20, 1.
3. Zadarko-Domaradzka M, Zadarko E. Aplikacje zdrowotne na urządzenia mobilne w edukacji zdrowotnej społeczeństwa. Edukacja – Technika – Informatyka 2016; 4(18): 291-6.
4. Fox S, Duggan M. Tracking for Health. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. Washington D.C.: Pew Research Center; 2013.
5. Haug S, Schaub MP, Venzin V, Meyer C, John U, Gmel G. A Pre-Post Study on the Appropriateness and Effectiveness of a Web- and Text Messaging-Based Intervention to Reduce Problem Drinking in Emerging Adults. J Med Internet Res 2013; 15(9): 126-37.
6. Haug S, Castro RP, Filler A, Kowatsch T, Fleisch E, Schaub MP. Efficacy of an internet and SMS-based integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention for smoking cessation in young people: study protocol of a two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial. BMC Public Health 2014; 14: 1140.
7. Michie S, Whittington C, Hamoudi Z, Zarnani F, Tober G, West R. Identification of behaviour change techniques to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Addiction 2012; 107(8): 1431-40.
8. Mirtenbaum ED, Domingo S, Fathi FD, Sobell LC. iSelfChange™: Randomized controlled trial of an iPhone app using an evidence-based alcohol intervention. 47th Annual Meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Addictive Behaviors SIG Student Poster Session. 2013. http://works.bepress.com/linda-sobell/233/.
9. Wieczorek Ł, Klingemann J. Mobile apps used to limit alcohol consumption – literature review. Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33(1): 43-64.
10. Molfenter T, Boyle M, Holloway D, Zwick J. Trends in telemedicine use in addiction treatment. Addict Sci Clin Pract 2015; 10: 14. DOI: 10.1186/s13722-015-0035-4.
11. Gustafson DH, Shaw BR, Isham A, Baker T, Boyle MG, Levy M. Explicating an Evidence-Based, Theoretically Informed, Mobile Technology-Based System to Improve Outcomes for People in Recovery for Alcohol Dependence. Subst Use Misuse 2011; 46(1): 96-111. DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2011.521413.
12. Lui JHL, Marcus DK, Barry CT. Evidence-based apps? A review of mental health mobile applications in a psychotherapy context. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2017; 48(3): 199-210. DOI: 10.1037/pro0000122.
13. Ramsey A. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services. Int J Ment Health Addict 2015; 13(4): 470-80. DOI: 10.1007/s11469-015-9551-4.
14. Savic M, Best D, Rodda S, Lubman DI. Exploring the focus and experiences of smartphone applications for addiction recovery. J Addict Dis 2013; 32(3): 310-9.
15. Thakker J, Ward T. Relapse Prevention: A Critique and Proposed Reconceptualisation. Behaviour Change 2010; 27(3): 154-75.
16. Wróblewski M, Klingemann J, Wieczorek Ł. Review and analysis of the functionality of mobile apps related to alcohol consumption. Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33(1): 1-18.
17. Penzenstadler L, Chatton A, Van Singer M, Khazaal Y. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Alcohol Use Disorder. Eur Addict Res 2016; 22: 329-38. DOI: 10.1159/000449097.
18. Stoyanov SR, Hides L, Kavanagh DJ, Zelenko O, Tjondronegoro D, Mani M. Mobile App Rating Scale: A New Tool for Assessing the Quality of Health Mobile Apps. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015; 3(1): e27. DOI: 10.2196/mhealth.3422.
19. Capon HW, Fry C, Carter A. Realising the technological promise of smartphones in addiction research and treatment: An ethical review. International Journal of Drug Policy 2016; 36: 47-57.
This is an Open Access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), allowing third parties to download and share its works but not commercially purposes or to create derivative works.
facebook linkedin twitter
© 2020 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe